Amendment Would Offer Congress a Role in Commissary Exchange Consolidation Plan

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR In an attempt to slow a Pentagon plan to consolidate the military’s three exchange services and the Defense Commissary Agency, lawmakers on the House Armed Services Committee last week added an amendment to the fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill requiring the department to assess the feasibility of creating a single military resale organization. The provision calls for DOD to prepare by Jan. 1, 2019, a financial assessment, a business case analysis, and “organizational, operational, and business model integration plans” for consolidating the commissary and exchange systems, reported Military Times. It also would bar the department from using congressional funding to carry out a merger. DOD already had been planning to launch a task force in July to look at the business case for merging the systems; officials also have prepared a legislative proposal needed to go ahead with a consolidation. But lawmakers want to have input on the process. “The fear is that DOD has already worked out the answer to the equation,” a congressional aide said. “We believe there needs to be more of a participative process. … There’s a lot to consider here.”Photo by Michael Strasserlast_img read more

Lila Downs Announces New Album Paying Tribute To The Chile Pepper Releases

first_img Lila Downs Announces New Album Paying Tribute To The Chile Pepper, Releases Tour Info Facebook Twitter News Lila Downs Announces New Album, Tour lila-downs-announces-new-album-paying-tribute-chile-pepper-releases-tour-info Email The announcement was made with the release of the first single, a cover of the Peruvian cumbia classic “Cariñito”Jennifer VelezGRAMMYs Apr 10, 2019 – 5:42 pm GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Lila Downs, known for her eclectic mixture sounds from Mexico and beyond, has announced that her latest album, Al Chile, will pay tribute to the chile pepper and will drop May 3. The news came with the release of the first single, “Cariñito.”Al Chile, produced by the GRAMMY-nominated DJ and producer Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound) and mixed by Mario Caldato Jr., who has worked with the Beastie Boys and Jack Johnson, is not a joke; it sincerely shows love for the fruit. “Yes, the music is a tribute to the fruit that causes us so much craving and suffering, but that we really love!” Downs said in a statement. “We fry the chile, add beats from the city, then saxophones, trumpets and drums from the Mexican coast to keep the dance going. The village and the city are united by the same beat. With a mezcal in hand, we dream of a place with a palm tree where one falls in love and reflects.”The first single is Down’s take on a Peruvian cumbia classic. The singer also released dates for the album’s supporting tour that will take her to Los Angeles’ Walt Disney Concert Hall, New York City, Seattle and other cities across the U.S.For more information on the tour, visit Downs’ website. Closing The Gap: How Latina Artists Are Combating Gender Inequality In Urban MusicRead morelast_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Part-Time Overnight Security Officer at Securtias Security ServicesFull-Time Retail Salesperson at Mattress FirmFull-Time Technician I at Charles River LabsFull-Time Sales & Client Management Representative at Cochrane VentilationFull-Time (Temp) Animal Care Technician I at Charles River LabsPart-Time Event Design & Decor Intern at Art Of The EventFull-Time Service Technician at Cochrane Ventilation Full-Time ABA Teacher Assistant at May InstitutePart-Time Shift Leader at DunkinPart-Time Crew Member at Dunkin(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 11, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

YouTube comments hidden by default in companys new test

first_imgWill YouTube say no comments? Sergei Konkov/Getty Images YouTube’s comments section can be a mix between no man’s land in a war zone and the Wild West. Translation: The place can be dangerous. So instead of making you read what the New Statesman called “the worst of the internet,” YouTube is working on a new feature that would hide comments by default.YouTube didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment but it confirmed the test in a statement to TechCrunch on Friday. “This is one of many small experiments we run all the time on YouTube, and we’ll consider rolling features out more broadly based on feedback on these experiments,” the Google-owned site told the publication. XDA developers had spotted the test in India on Wednesday. You have to scroll past engagement buttons and recommended videos to find the comments section on Android and iOS now, but the new test reportedly hides the comments section entirely. Comments would instead be accessible by clicking a new icon, beneath the video and to the right of the thumbs-down icon. Comments could also be found by scrolling past the recommended videos, like before, but you’d have to tap to see them. It remains to be seen whether a user’s engagement with a video would drop if comments were hidden.  Comment YouTube banning supremacist and hoax videos, Amazon unveils… CNET Apps Today Share your voice Tags Now playing: Watch this: 1:12 1 Mobile Software Mobile Apps YouTubelast_img read more

Karnataka man stabs wife to death chops head off

first_imgGetty Images [Representational Image]A man chopped his wife’s head off after stabbing her to death and tried to dump her body in a canal. The victim, 19-year-old Nivetha, and her husband Muniappan, 28, had been married only for eight months and were living at Mettukadai near Erode in Tamil Nadu. Muniappan hails from Shimoga district of Karnataka.According to the police, the couple used to get into arguments that would eventually lead to a fight. It was reported  that Muniappan doubted her fidelity. A similar clash broke out between the couples on Monday and an angry Muniappan stabbed his wife on the neck and then beheaded her. According to the reports, after murdering Nivetha, Muniappan stuffed her body in a tow sack and her severed head in a bag. He tied the bag and sack to his motorbike and proceeded to dump them in a nearby canal when some people noticed a woman’s leg protruding from the sack.The alarmed public chased Muniappan, who abandoned his bike and jumped into the canal. The mob caught him forthwith. The police rushed to the scene after being alerted about the incident and arrested Muniappan. Police booked him for murder and initiated an investigation into the matter.last_img read more

More pain ahead Indian banks stare at Rs 25 trln new bad

first_imgAn employee works on electric pylons at a power station in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi June 8, 2012 (representational image).Reuters fileThere is more pain lurking for India’s troubled banking sector with the lenders staring at potential bad loans of $38 billion (Rs 2.5 trillion) from the power sector, according to a report.”Of the $178 billion (around Rs 11.7 trillion) of debt of the power sector, $53 billion are already under stress (primarily to the generation sector) and of this, as much as $38 billion have the potential of being written-off as bad loans,” the Bank of America-Merrill Lynch said in a report on Wednesday.The report is based on the fact that as much as 71 gigawatt of private sector coal-based projects are facing bankruptcy filings at various National Company Law Tribunals, implying probable resolution from June 2019 and it expects an average 75 percent write-off in these loans.Power sector has been a major concern in India, due to decline in fiscal health of State Electricity Boards. The debt-laded sector is struggling to service and pay off billions of dollars in loans, posing a major debt risk for the banking sector.In order to rescue the sector, the government is trying to revamp the space by releasing the projects that have been stuck due to major need of funds but failure to enact and implement supplemental laws at the state level have continued to pose a hindrance.As per the BofA-ML report, of the $178 billion loan, the distribution companies have $65 billion, generation companies have $7 billion, and transmission firms have a debt burden of $36 billion.Brokerage estimates the power generation sector accounts for 53 percent of the debt on domestic bank watchlists, followed by non-banking finance companies (NBFCs) at 35 per cent and the balance from the states.It also states that tariff hikes are not the way forward for the sector to turnaround as already tariffs for industrial and commercial consumers, who constitute 37 percent of demand, are very high compared to its regional peers.But the report is critical of the reforms introduced to address inefficiencies saying they expect limited progress.last_img read more

Sale of passenger vehicles falls for ninth straight month as slowdown bites

first_imgCar and motorcycle makers have laid off 15,000 people and component manufacturers 100,000, with the remaining job losses at dealers.ReutersThe passenger vehicle sales in India saw the steepest fall in nearly two decades in July. Car sales to dealerships fell 31 percent to 200,790 units in July, marking the ninth straight month of drop,  data from the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) showed. The SIAM data also revealed that commercial vehicle sales fell by 25.7 percent to 56,866 units in the same quarter. The two-wheeler segment also witnessed a fall of 16.8 percent to about 1.51 million units.  ReutersSIAM said there was a 17 percent decrease in the domestic passenger vehicle production in July. Vishnu Mathur, Director General of SIAM, told media that there is an urgent need for government measures to revive the industry. He added that the industry is trying hard to get back the sales momentum and it requires government support to prevent the crisis from worsening.Maruti Suzuki, India’s auto manufacturing giant, witnessed a fall of 18.3 percent in its valuation since the beginning of the financial year. The country is facing a major crisis with its S&P BSE auto sector index falling about 23 percent in the first quarter. The logo of Maruti Suzuki India Limited is seen on a glass door at a showroom in New Delhi, India, February 29, 2016.REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee/File PhotoAmid the liquidity crunch in the country, with the banking sector going on the back foot in terms of new credit, the demand for consumer goods is declining. This is the major reason behind the fall in car sales. To cope up with the slumping sales and stagnant market, the Indian auto sector has been slashing employee count. The falling sales have also led to the closure of factories for days while the auto part suppliers are on the verge of shutting down completely due to lack of demand.In an effort to restore the health og the auto sector, the industry demanded tax cuts and easier access to finance for dealers and buyers at a meeting with the Indian Government officials, last week. Generic auto parts in IndiaReuterslast_img read more

3 including siblings die taking excessive liquor

first_imgNarayanganjThree young men died reportedly after taking excessive liquor during a pre-wedding party at Narayanganj’s Siddhirganj on Friday noon, reports UNB.The deceased are Ashique Hossain, 20, son of Abul Hossain and two brothers –Akib Uddin, 24, and Rasel, 28–sons of Alauddin Akhter of the area.Locals said the trio and some others consumed foreign-made alcohol during a ‘holud’ ceremony on Wednesday night. At one stage, the victims fell sick, they added.Later, they were taken to Dhaka Medical College Hospital on Thursday morning.The victims died on Friday noon while undergoing treatment at DMCH, said Shahin Shah Parvez, officer-in-charge of Siddhirganj police station.The bodies were kept at hospital morgue for autopsy, the OC added.last_img

US asks Myanmar to create conditions for sustainable Rohingya return

first_imgUS State Department. File PhotoThe United States has called on Myanmar to create the conditions that would allow for voluntary, safe, dignified, and sustainable returns of Rohingyas to their place of origin in Rakhine State, reports UNB.The US also commended the government of Bangladesh’s generosity in responding to this humanitarian crisis and appreciated its continued efforts to ensure assistance reaches the affected population, said the US Department of State in a media note on Friday.Earlier, the United States announced $60 million in humanitarian assistance at the launch of the 2019 UN Joint Response Plan for Bangladesh in Geneva.This funding will help address the emergency needs of more than 900,000 Rohingyas in Bangladesh, most of whom are Rohingya women and children from Myanmar, and the related needs of Bangladeshi host communities.The beneficiaries include Rohingyas who have taken refuge in Bangladesh since August 2017, when Myanmar security forces began committing atrocities, including ethnic cleansing, against Rohingya villagers across northern Rakhine State.The United States remains the leading contributor to the humanitarian response to this crisis in Myanmar and Bangladesh, having provided nearly $449 million since the outbreak of violence in August 2017, of which nearly $406 million is for programmes inside Bangladesh.”We continue to call on others to join us in contributing to this humanitarian response,” the media note reads.US assistance provides protection, emergency shelter, food, water, sanitation, health care, psychosocial support, and education for people affected by the crisis, including Bangladeshi host communities and people displaced inside Myanmar and in the region.US assistance also supports the efforts of humanitarian organisations and the government of Bangladesh to improve camp infrastructure and shelter ahead of the monsoon and cyclone seasons.last_img read more

Greece wildfires death toll rises to 91

first_imgThe wreckage of a burnt car is pictured on the sea side of the village of Mati, near Athens, on 28 July, 2018, after Greece`s worst wildfires killed 88, many of them children, on 23 July. Photo: AFPGreek fire services on Sunday said three more people were confirmed killed by the wildfires that have devastated seaside resorts near Athens, bringing the death toll in the disaster to 91.Another 25 remain missing, said spokeswoman Stavroula Malliri, giving a precise figure for the first time after mounting criticism over the issue.But some or all of the missing may be among 28 victims whose bodies are currently being examined by forensic pathologists and have not been identified, civil protection spokesman Spyros Georgiou told AFP.Several children — the total is not yet known — have become the face of the tragedy, including nine-year-old twin girls, a six-month-old infant, a brother and sister aged 11 and 13, and another 13-year-old.Four foreign victims have so far been identified including a young Irishman on his honeymoon, a Polish woman and her son, and a Belgian man whose daughter was rescued.A picture taken on 28 July, 2018 shows the outside of a villa in Mati, near Athens, where three children and their grandparents were found dead after Greece`s worst wildfires killed 88, many of them children, on 23 July. Photo: AFPFinger-pointing over the authorities’ handling of the crisis intensified on Sunday as the rightwing and centrist opposition accused the government of initially trying to hide the loss of human life.The fire services on Sunday continued to probe the causes of the wildfires, with the government suspecting criminal origins.The daily Kathimerini said that an initial report pointed to criminal negligence on the part of a resident who lit a bonfire of dead leaves and branches.last_img

Bees helping to monitor air quality at German airports

first_img Explore further Citation: Bees helping to monitor air quality at German airports (2010, July 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-bees-air-quality-german-airports.html Using bees for biomonitoring of environmental health around airports is a recent development, but insects have been used successfully for some time to monitor water quality at a number of sites.The honey produced at the airports is tested in the laboratory twice a year for heavy metals and certain hydrocarbons, and has so far been found to be comparable to honey produced in non-industrial areas. Volker Liebig, a chemist with Orga Lab, which tests the samples, said more data is needed over a longer period for the results to be conclusive, but he said preliminary results looked promising.Düsseldorf International Airport’s community liaison officer Peter Nengelken said this year’s first batch of honey, harvested in June from the 200,000 bees at the airport, had been tested and found to contain toxin levels far below recommended limits, and about the same as honey from rural areas. This is consistent with the results from the previous years since the bee monitoring began in 2006. Air quality at all the airports is also monitored in more traditional ways.Pollution at airports has a number of sources, including aircraft, cars, buses, and industries, which often cluster in the vicinity of airports. Around the world the air quality around airports is monitored, and the stringent monitoring requirements set by the International Civil Aviation Organization, a body of the United Nations, have led to a substantial reduction in pollution at major airports.Pollution reduction has been achieved by the development of cleaner aircraft engines and ground support vehicles, and by improvements in equipment operation procedures. Even so, some community groups remain concerned, especially about lead levels and the presence of ultrafine particles originating from jet aircraft, cars and trucks. In Germany, airport officials view the bees as a simple and easy-to-understand way to demonstrate to the public that airports are much cleaner and safer than they once were.The health effects of ultrafine particles are unknown as yet but there is some research suggesting they may pose a risk because the particles are fine enough to pass through cell walls and may be able to penetrate into the brain and other organs. Ultrafine particle emissions are currently not regulated in the US, but there are limits for vehicle emissions of ultrafine particles in Europe.The bees at Düsseldorf International airport are kept by local beekeepers, and the honey is bottled as “Düsseldorf Natural” and given away. Hidden threat: Elevated pollution levels near regional airports © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Air quality around eight airports in Germany is being monitored with the help of bees, whose honey is tested regularly for toxins.last_img read more

Suffered acne You may show fewer signs of ageing

first_imgSuffering from those itchy red pimples? Take heart, as your skin may age more slowly than those with no history of acne, a study has found. Signs of ageing such as wrinkles and skin thinning often appear much later in people who have experienced acne in their lifetime. It has been suggested that this is due to increased oil production but there are likely to be other factors involved, the study said. The findings revealed that people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres in their white blood cells, meaning that their cells could be better protected against ageing. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfTelomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found at the end of chromosomes, which protect them from deteriorating during the process of replication.  The telomeres gradually break down and shrink as cells age, eventually leading to cell death, which is a normal part of human growth and ageing. “Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres which appears to be different in acne sufferers and means their cells may be protected against ageing,” said lead author Simone Ribero, a dermatologist at King’s College London.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive“For many years dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime. Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear,” Ribero said.In the study the team measured the length of white blood cell telomeres in 1,205 twins. A quarter of the twins reported having experienced acne in their lifetime.Statistical analyses which adjusted for age, relatedness, weight and height showed that telomere length in acne sufferers was significantly longer, meaning that white blood cells were more protected from the usual deterioration with age. The researchers also examined gene expression in pre-existing skin biopsies from the same twins to identify possible gene pathways linked to acne.last_img read more

4 Choices Youll Make Running Your Startup in the Age of Robots

first_img There’s been a lot of buzz lately about the threat to our way of economic life from robots and artificial intelligence. Many see major problems, and the fears they express tend to draw attention.Related: Robotics Is Here and Already It’s Changing EverythingTesla founder Elon Musk, for instance, made headlines predicting the end of the world in what resembled — more than a little — the story line from the Terminator franchise. Others have described robots replacing workers in businesses and prompting unemployment rates of 50 percent or more. And still other naysayers have said they suspect robots will take over production, thereby forcing all humans to become marketers.But there also have been those who argue that the threat is exaggerated and robots and AI could be a real benefit, as they could free us from hard and dangerous work. These forecasters have said this will be a win primarily for low-skilled workers, an advantage good for business.Regardless of the eventual outcome, the  advances in technology and software will almost certainly change the economy in both the short- and long term. Regulators will respond to the challenges, raising still more dire predictions — this time from within the tech industry — where observers say they fear government will soon have to pay our salaries and therefore should foot the bill by taxing robots as “employeees.”Whatever the technology revolution eventually looks like, it will change the nature of business and the nature of how startups are managed and decisions made. In short, the robot revolution will affect how we hire and fire, and how human resources operates, in general. In that context, here are four potentail trade-offs every startup will need to make:1. Flexibility vs. productivityThe robots that are already out there can be enormously productive, working with unbeatable precision and stamina, and never needing a cigarette break. They don’t gossip or bully. They aren’t jealous of the next guy getting a raise. But their down side is that they can perform only one or a few very specific or standardized tasks, whereas an employee can chip in wherever needed.The truth is, nothing beats a real human being in terms of the scope of things we can do — and do well. That’s why 20th century economist Ludwig von Mises made a point of stating that human labor is unspecific but that other factors of production are not. “More specific” means more productive but less flexible.In startups, this flexibility is an enormously important quality that beats the productivity of machines any day. Robots and software can carry out specific tasks with superb productivity, but they cannot switch to sweet-talking a neglected customer when that’s what needs to be done.2. Problem-solving vs. productionRobots can’t solve problems that have not first been clearly defined. And even then, they can be used effectively only if a solution is available and engineered.This applies to machine learning and AI too, even though those technologies are super-powerful at finding proverbial needles in data haystacks. They can find patterns that are hidden to the naked (human) eye. But — again, the down side: Where patterns don’t persist and things change over time, these technologies simply don’t work well.Related: Robots Aren’t Taking Over The Job Market Just YetThe typical startup is also far from the structured environment that these technologies require. This is not a question of data availability, but of soft skills and innovative problem-solving.Most startups struggle with tweaking the business model, improving consumer relations and putting out (plenty of) fires. Those changes require advance interpretation and understanding; they need the ability to change quickly and go in a new and not necessarily well-defined direction.And these are qualities that people have but machines do not.Simply put, if the problems in your startup are straightforward or at least can be solved using codified information, then choose technology over people. Otherwise do not.3. The creation of value vs. structure It bears repeating that startups are not smaller versions of the larger company. They’re separate and unique; they do different things and do them differently.Startups also attempt to find and refine their market niche and value proposition, and they struggle to make ends meet, whereas established firms focus on structuring their organization and standardizing production processes.In other words, startups are in pursuit of creating new value and trying to discover the extent of their perceived entrepreneurial opportunity.Large companies, in contrast, are exploiting their opportunity. Their main focus is on profit maximization through cost-cutting, standardizing and streamlining production.So, large companies are solving an entirely different problem, approaching that solution through structure, control and management — which is  fundamentally conducive to automation and, therefore, to machines instead of people.4. Outsourcing vs. in-house productionWhile production in mature businesses is more streamlined and structured, these businesses have often established a cost advantage for what they do in-house.Startups are different and generally cannot afford to think in terms of optimized production volumes or cost minimization. Indeed, cash-flow problems kill 25 percent of startups.It’s more important for startups to avoid large up-front investments than to find the cheapest way to produce. Purchasing the machines necessary for in-house production makes little sense when the firm’s survival depends on cash flow.It could be a recipe for success to not produce in-house, to avoid huge outlays — even if that means higher COGS. If a company is in that positon, it should take advantage of other businesses’ cost minimization efforts by outsourcing.Undoubtedly, machines undoubtedly have a place in business, but humans do, too. The advances in robotics and AI shift the boundaries for what machines can do, but machines alone cannot replace humans in everything. We are unbeatable in dynamic milieus and open-ended tasks due to our “soft” skills: creativity, imagination and problem-solving.Related: Robotics: A Threat to Manpower?And these skills are core to entrepreneurship. So, perhaps there’s no reason to fear technology for the immediate future, if ever. Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 6 min read February 1, 2019 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

House Insurance Committee approves Rep Bellinos air ambulance legislation

first_img30Nov House Insurance Committee approves Rep. Bellino’s air ambulance legislation Categories: Bellino News The House Insurance Committee today unanimously approved air ambulance reform legislation authored by state Rep. Joe Bellino, of Monroe.Bellino’s measure requires hospitals to transport patients via ground ambulances, rather than air ambulances, unless medically necessary. Many times, patients are transported to hospitals by air ambulance without it being necessary and are eventually slammed with outrageous medical bills.“This legislation is a much-needed remedy for patients in hardship,” said Bellino, who serves on the committee. “Through no fault of their own, patients bear a heavy cost when being transported by air rather than ground.”Air ambulance companies currently participate in “balance billing” where the patient’s health care provider will pay for a portion of the bill, but not its entirety. This leaves patients with medical bills in the tens of thousands of dollars.“We are simply trying to protect patients and their pocketbooks,” Bellino said. “As a Legislature, we need to make sure residents across the state are not faced with unnecessary financial burdens.”House Bill 5217 now moves to the full House for consideration.last_img read more

Chausée dAmour UK pay TV service Virgin Media ha

first_imgChausée d’AmourUK pay TV service Virgin Media has acquired exclusive rights to a ‘Flemish noir’ drama about an infamous brothel-lined street in Belgium.The deal for Chaussée d’Amour, which is considered ‘the ‘first’ original Flemish pay TV series locally, will see Virgin TV Full House customers given access on-demand.The series, produced in Dutch with English subtitles, runs to ten hours.It comes from noir-influenced duo Frank Devos and Pieter Van Hees, and was coproduced by Virgin Media parent Liberty global, Belgian prodco DeMensen and cousin pay TV operation Telenet. Germany’s ZDFneo and ZDF Enterprises were also attached, with the latter holding distribution rights.The character-driven drama follows a distinguished woman who is forced inherit a brothel after her father dies unexpectedly, while supporting her young children and building a new life in the midst of a murder investigation.Virgin has been pushing into original content through the acquisition of series such as Magic City and Ash Vs Evil Dead, and has dipped its toes into commissioning.Despite Chaussée d’Amour coming from Liberty, the deal is not part of Virgin’s international coproduction deal with Liberty cousin All3Media.“For Virgin TV the launch of Chaussée d’Amour represents an exciting step into the evolving and provocative realm of ‘Flemish noir,’ which is in keeping with our strong record of bringing new, exclusive programming designed to challenge and excite customers,” said Virgin’s chief entertainment officer, David Bouchier.The show will be available through Virgin TV and TiVo set-top boxes, the Virgin TV Everywhere app and iOS and Android devices.last_img read more

A DOMESTIC abuse charity based in Derry is to hold

first_img A DOMESTIC abuse charity based in Derry is to hold a walk across the Peace Bridge tomorrow.Organised by the La Dolce Vita Project, the ‘Walk in My Shoes Walk of Freedom’ event will start at 12 noon in Ebrington Square.It will end at the City Hotel, where several high profile speakers will address the crowd. #DONNA MARIA LOGUEebrington squareLA DOLCE VITApeace bridgeWALK ACROSS DERRY PEACE BRIDGE FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY DOMESTIC ABUSEWALK IN MY SHOES All the walkers at tomorrow’s event have been asked to bring a pair of shoes which will be exchanged before the event takes place.T-shirts, tea, coffee and a buffet will be provided on the day for the event, which is sponsored by ‘The Big Lottery’Those who wish to attend are asked to register in advance by telephoning La Dolce Vita Project on 02871 377272 or emailing ladolcevita5277@gmail.com.WALK ACROSS DERRY PEACE BRIDGE FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY DOMESTIC ABUSE was last modified: January 2nd, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: They SDLP Foyle MLA Mark H Durkan, former Sinn Fein MLA Maeve McLaughlin, Michael Lynch from the Men’s Action Network, Stephanie Hill from the Way to Go Project and Francis Shields from Focus.‘La Dolce Vita Project’ was set up by local Donna Maria Logue last January.Friends suggested to her that she use the knowledge she gained during her own experience of domestic abuse to help others.The group also offers advice to families who may suspect that a loved one is the victim of domestic abuse. ShareTweetlast_img read more

The Internet is full of stories about politicians

first_imgThe Internet is full of stories about politicians acting badly and doing the opposite of what they promised. Talk radio is full of the same things, all day, every day. Even around office water coolers, almost everyone will admit that politicians are liars and thieves. Given all of this, it’s rather bizarre that people still believe and obey the bums. If we knew such things about a neighbor, would we continue to take them seriously? Yet, for some reason, politicians get a permanent pass on anything stupid they do. The first reason for this is simply that most people have been bamboozled. They were taught that government is necessary and that without it, we’d all be ignorant savages, eating whatever few berries and roots we could scrounge… that without government nothing would be built, nothing invented, and nothing taught. That’s all propaganda, of course, paid for by the people it praises. But, it’s what we were all taught and it’s hard for people to let it go, no matter how stupid it is. The second reason is that people are afraid. We all know why. None of that, however, is what I want to cover today. Instead, I want to look at the subtle reasons why people can’t let go of “politics.” These reasons are very powerful, but they lie beneath the surface and are harder to identify than self-serving, government-funded BS. Reason #1: I Can Blame Anyone but Me Somehow, people all across the West have become pathologically afraid of blame. It probably began as a corrosive fear of hell: If I’m to blame for anything, I’ll go to hell, and that must be avoided. But be that as it may, this fear of blame allows political parties to provide a highly desirable service: They help you assign all blame to others. If you like the Red party, you can always affix blame to the Blues and not to yourself. If you’re in the Blue party, you can lay all blame onto the Reds. It’s actually an elegant scam. The Blue v. Red show lets everyone avoid taking any blame onto themselves, while the big machine keeps right on running. This fear of blame is ridiculous, of course: We’ve all made mistakes. What matters is correcting them and not repeating them. But if we pretend we never make mistakes, nothing gets fixed and the problems continue. This neurotic avoidance of blame puts politicians in wonderful position – they don’t actually have to solve anything, and any blame is deflected to their evil opposition. Reason #2: It Makes Me Feel Brave at No Expense Politics lets us pretend that we’re fixing problems at no expense, save talking. Actually doing something is not required. Politics empowers our mere words to generate powerful results. At least that’s what people want to believe. It’s the easy way out. You never have to get up and act. You never have to take a real risk. No blood, no sweat, no tears. This is just another scam, of course: The politicians continue do what they want, and the people keep right on believing, even though their words seldom generate any real results. All they need to do is keep you in the game. So long as you keep hoping that your words will affect the future, they can do whatever they please. The alternative would be taking responsibility onto yourself and acting on your own. Gain would require pain… precisely the thing that people want to avoid. So, instead, they keep believing that politics will magically turn complaints into results, and they remain tied into the system, no matter how badly it fails them. Reason #3: It Makes Me Feel Noble at No Expense Politics lets you pour charity onto the targets of your choice, without any personal expense. The magical money pot in the capital city dispenses it, and you feel no pain. It doesn’t matter what your target of choice is, by the way. For some, it’s “the less fortunate,” to others, it’s people on another continent. It really doesn’t matter, aside from the fact that it makes you feel good to help people and that you never have to put your hand into your own pocket. Again, this is clearly a scam: The money comes from ourselves (in ways we don’t think about), from others (those super-rich people), or, primarily these days, from generations yet unborn in the form of state debt. But, those are things that can be ignored, and politicians are always quick to help us ignore them. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

first_img— – Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry DirectorSean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Get Ready:This Wednesday at 8 pm, Porter Stansberry, founder of Stansberry Research, will host an exclusive live webinar called: “How to Profit from the Greatest Transfer of Wealth in History.” You won’t want to miss this… click here to reserve your seat. Critical Warning to Anyone Who Was Born Before 1969We just got exclusive information obtained from an “invitation-only” meeting in Washington, D.C. Some of the most powerful people in finance gathered behind closed doors to discuss a secret deal… one that could have a major impact on your finances, especially if you were born before 1969. If you’re a senior and rely on the government for income, you’ll be badly hurt if this deal gets inked. Click here to see the details. – Recommended Links Doug: Scandinavia is on a slippery slope. I wouldn’t be surprised if a very nasty “black swan” the size of a pterodactyl landed there. The U.S. isn’t far behind. Big Brother is coming out of the cellar, where he’s been chained up, in the U.S. And I’m afraid he’s so strong and nasty that few people will be able to pay him enough to leave them alone.There have long been local pockets of notorious corruption in the U.S., of course; building inspectors, people like that. On a national level, the DEA became very corrupt early on, a natural consequence of “regulating” an industry that runs on billions in cash.Other federal agencies are more subtly corrupt. Generals are paid off by being hired by defense contractors after they’re mustered out. FDA types are hired by the drug companies and large agribusinesses, and executives from those companies become high-level bureaucrats in the FDA. Politicians rarely take envelopes of cash anymore. They wait until they are out of office to collect millions in directors’ fees, book deals, speaking tours, stock deals, and the like. Bill Clinton is a perfect example of someone who went from near penniless to a net worth of $50 million-plus overnight. The Clintons have made a huge leap from the days when Hillary had to take a $100,000 payoff in the guise of her totally transparent cattle-trading scheme.The problem now, though, is that there are giant police bureaucracies like the TSA and the FBI that have no direct way of getting paid off. So they enforce the idiotic laws like robots. Other bureaucracies like NSA do their damage remotely, too far from the victim to be negotiated with. This is a real source of danger.Doug Casey is a multi-millionaire speculator and the founder of Casey Research. He literally wrote the book on profiting during economic turmoil. Doug’s book, Crisis Investing, spent multiple weeks as number one on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the best-selling financial book of 1980. Doug has been a regular guest on national television, including spots on CNN, Merv Griffin, Charlie Rose, Regis Philbin, Phil Donahue, and NBC News.Doug and his team of analysts write The Casey Report, one of the world’s most respected investment advisories. Each month, The Casey Report provides specific, actionable ideas to help subscribers make money in stocks, bonds, currencies, real estate, and commodities. You can try out The Casey Report risk-free by clicking here. L: It’s interesting: These countries where a high degree of legal regulation seems to work are also highly homogeneous and have very powerful cultures; makes you wonder if the laws are really doing anything at all, or if they are just window dressing on more powerful social systems.It makes me think of the many experimental societies tried out in the 19th century in the U.S., when there were still open frontiers to which one could escape with like-minded people and try to do things differently. Most were communes. And most were disasters. Some worked, and a few even still exist in vestigial form today, like the Amana colonies. Those that worked best were religious communes. Just goes to show that if you can go beyond homogeneity and get unanimity, you can create a society that seems to defy all experience to the contrary. When everyone buys in, amazing things can happen…at least for a while.Doug: Almost anything can work for a while. Some monasteries approach an almost perfect state of communism. It’s possible because everyone there chooses to be there and live according to those rules. Unanimous consent. But that’s not possible in an entire country, and even the super-majority buy-in of highly homogeneous cultures like New Zealand and Scandinavia is not possible in 98% of the rest of the countries in the world. If you look at the rest of the world, the more socialistic and regulated the country, the more corrupt it tends to be. And the larger the country, the more disparate the population and divergent the mores, the less effective the government’s regulation.L: That would cover China, Russia…Brazil, Mexico.Doug: And Argentina, where I am now. The customs inspectors down here, for example, all expect to retire as multimillionaires. That’s because they have so many laws on what you can export or import…how, when, and why, it’s almost impossible to comply with, or even know, all the laws. It’s much cheaper and easier to get the inspector to look the other way with a well-placed envelope.There’s good news and bad news in this.In itself, corruption is a bad thing; it shouldn’t have to be necessary. As I touched on earlier, insofar as it’s necessary, it’s also a good thing. If we can’t eliminate the laws that give rise to corruption, it’s a good thing that it’s possible to circumvent these laws. The worst of all situations is to have a mass of strict, stultifying, economically suicidal laws…and also have strict, effective enforcement of those laws. If a culture doesn’t allow people to work around stupid laws, that culture’s doom is further sealed with every stupid law passed, which is pretty much all of them.L: Strict laws, strictly enforced, is a recipe for paralysis. I’ve often said that while Mexico is much less free than the U.S. on paper, it is much more free in fact. People in the U.S. fear their government, especially the IRS. In Mexico, people build what they want, eat what they want, sell what they want; tax evasion is the national pastime.Doug: Right. This is one of the reasons why, though I’ve lived in New Zealand quite a bit over the last 10 years, I’m not really interested in hanging my spurs there any longer. Although it’s gotten vastly better since the reforms of the mid-’80s, it’s still a dull, insular place with a lot of ingrained socialist attitudes, but not much corruption to help you obviate them. And I wouldn’t want to live in the Scandinavian countries either.They have all these incredibly stupid laws that sheep-like residents obey, enabling great tyranny, but it goes unrecognized because it has such popular support. It suits me much better to live in a place like Argentina, where there’s an equal number of stupid laws, but nobody pays any attention to them. And when there is a problem, it can most often be handled, informally.L: I won’t ask you on the record if you’ve ever actually done that. Interesting comment about Scandinavia: I was just reading Google News yesterday, and one of the top video news stories was a clip about some poor woman in Sweden who’s had her twin daughters taken away by the child protection busybodies. The children were taken, without notice, from their school, and the woman didn’t even know it was an official abduction until she got a letter a week later. The real horror of it is that there isn’t actually any evidence of wrongdoing on the woman’s part. The law is preemptive and protective; the bureaucrats are authorized to remove children from their families if there might be danger to them. No due process, and forget about “innocent until proven guilty.” The breathtaking assumption is that it’s better to rip children out of their families than to find out if there’s a real problem first. This could only hold sway in a place where the culture is one of great confidence in the wisdom and benevolence of the state. “They’ll do everything they can to push the price of gold down.”This statement was made by keynote speaker and trend forecaster Gerald Celente at the 2015 Casey Research Summit. Find out what Mr. Celente has to say about gold manipulation…the Federal Reserve’s hidden scheme…and how you can protect yourself from it right here. (Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)This interview was first published on February 9, 2011Editor’s Note: In yesterday’s Weekend Edition, Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why laws and regulations can’t stop corruption. Today, Doug explains why corruption in government can actually be a good thing….Louis James: I think the point of government-sponsored irresponsibility is particularly important, and often overlooked.I’ve long thought that it was FDR’s New Deal that really pushed America over the edge, not so much because of the economic cost, but because it made it very clear to people that they did not need to be responsible for themselves. Big Brother now takes care of them when they get old, or should they fall ill, or lose a job; no need to plan ahead or save… It’s no wonder our culture has transformed from one of individualism and self-reliance to one of groupthink and reliance on the state, populated by entitlement-minded couch potatoes.But what do you say to people who point to places like Sweden, a highly government-regulated society that seems to work? Such a nice, clean place, with lots of government.Doug: It’s a good point. Sweden is at the low end of the corruption scale, but it’s not because they have laws against corruption; everybody has those. It’s because of the culture; the peer pressure, moral opprobrium, and social approbation I mentioned earlier. Sweden is a small country where word of misdeeds spreads quickly. It has a highly homogeneous culture based on deep-rooted traditions, and there’s a high degree of consensus about how things should be. That makes Swedes cooperate with the large body of law that reflects that consensus, much more than would happen almost anywhere else, or is even possible anywhere else.Out of a couple hundred countries in the world outside of Scandinavia, I can think of two other places that have a similarly powerful culture that makes a “big-government” approach to managing society seem to work: New Zealand and Uruguay. These places are small, relatively isolated, homogeneous, and with powerful cultural traditions that have, unfortunately, been codified into law. These countries, coincidentally, also have the three oldest socialist governments in the world, all dating back to the turn of the 20th century. Trying to bribe officials in these places, even Uruguay, is pretty much out of the question.But these places are anomalous. Because of their rare characteristics, they can’t be held up as role models for other places. Almost everywhere else, where there’s more diversity of ethnicity, culture, much larger population, and so forth, Scandinavian socialism wouldn’t even have the appearance of working. And, I’d argue, it won’t work much longer in Scandinavia either; Sweden and these other places will ultimately collapse under the weight of their mass of laws and socialist intervention in their economies. Recommended Links —last_img read more

It was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 am

first_imgIt was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 a.m. on a January morning. Her son Jeff had been caught using drugs in a New Hampshire sober home and was being kicked out.Bea and her husband, Doug Duncan, drove north that night nine years ago to pick Jeff up. On the ride back home, to Natick, Mass., the parents delivered an ultimatum: Their son had to go back to rehab, or leave home.Jeff chose the latter, Bea says. She remembers a lot of yelling, cursing and tears as they stopped the car, in the dead of night, a few miles from the house.”It was really, really difficult to actually just drop him off in a parking lot on our way home and say, ‘you made the decision — no rehab — so we made the decision, no home,’ ” Bea says. “It was exquisitely difficult.”Doug Duncan says many parents had told him to expect this moment. He remembers them saying their son would have to “hit rock bottom; you’re going to have to kick him out of the house.”Two torturous days later, Jeff Duncan came home. Although he returned to rehab, the Duncans decided their approach wasn’t working. They sought help, eventually connecting with a program that, instead of tough love, stresses empathy: CRAFT or Community Reinforcement and Family Training.”There was more compassion and, ‘Wow, this is really difficult for you’; more open questions to him instead of dictating what he should and should not behave like,” says Bea. Many drug users say, in hindsight, they’ve appreciated being forced into treatment. But studies show that a compassionate approach and voluntary treatment are the more effective ways to engage drug users in recovery and keep them alive. That’s a critical consideration for families in this era of fentanyl, a powerful opioid that can shut down breathing in seconds.”The concept of letting their children hit bottom is not the best strategy,” says Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Because in hitting bottom they may die.”After they went through CRAFT training, the Duncans say things started to shift from chaos to calm.”I started to feel an immense sense of relief,” Bea says. “I stopped feeling like I had to be a private investigator and controlling mom. I could kind of walk side-by-side with him on this journey, instead of feeling like I had to take charge of it.”For the Duncans, the approach meant they could switch from enforcing family consequences, like kicking Jeff out of the house, to supporting him as he faced other challenges, like losing a job because of his drug use.It worked well: Bea and Doug helped Jeff stick to his recovery. He’s 28 now and has been sober for nine years.But desperate parents often don’t know how to avoid “hitting bottom” with their children, as the Duncans did on that dark and frigid January morning. The Duncans have found ways to help others: Doug is a parent coach through the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which is now collaborating with the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center.The collaboration will close a gap in services for families caught up in the opioid epidemic, says Grayken Center’s director, Michael Botticelli, who served as drug czar in the Obama administration.”They don’t call this a family disease for no good reason,” Botticelli says. “The whole design of these services [is] to promote tools and information for families, so they know how to approach a situation and can heal.”There is no uniform path to healing for the drug user or parents, and no widespread agreement on the best approach for families.Joanne Peterson, who founded the parent support network Learn to Cope, says there are reasons why some parents ask older children to leave the house — if there are younger children at home or if the parents don’t feel safe.”So it depends on what ‘tough love’ means; it can mean many different things,” Peterson says.She applauds the Grayken Center for expanding access to parent coaches, but “we also need more professional help.” Peterson says she routinely hears from parents who can’t find counselors and doctors who understand their daily traumas.Some critics suggest the CRAFT model is too soft, that it enables drug use.”That’s a misconception,” says Fred Muench, president of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “CRAFT is authoritative parenting, creating a sense of responsibility in the child, and at the same time saying, ‘I am here for you; I love you; I’m going to help you; but I can’t help you avoid negative consequences if you’re not looking to do that on your own.’ “The parent coaching extends beyond periods of crisis.On a recent afternoon, Doug Duncan was on the phone with Doreen, a mom whose daughter is in recovery. (We’re using only Doreen’s first name to protect her daughter’s privacy.) Doreen was upset about an angry text from her daughter that sounded like the messages the young woman sent when she was using drugs.”It brings me back there. In two seconds, I am back on that scene thinking she’s on the heroin, she’s not going to live,” Doreen told Duncan, expressing a very common fear of a loved one’s relapse.In a panic — her daughter had overdosed twice and been rescued — Doreen wanted to ask if she was using heroin again. But she ran it by Duncan first. He encouraged her to talk it through.Doreen paused, then said she could ask her daughter about work — whether it’s been stressful — or about her grief after a friend’s recent death. There are many reasons, Doreen realized, that her daughter might be angry. Her tone didn’t have to signal a relapse.”You talk yourself off the cliff,” Duncan told her.”Oh yes, I know all about that cliff, I’ve visited a few times before,” Doreen said, and laughed. “You know, that ties in with what you said before about focusing less on what your feelings are, and the terror or fear that you’re going through, and more on what they’re feeling and what they’re going through — turn the tables a bit. That’s an excellent point.””That’s true compassion,” Duncan told her, “and oddly enough it’s very therapeutic for you, too.”More compassion in the home fits the shift away from criminalizing addiction — toward accepting and treating it as a chronic medical condition.If a child had cancer, parents “wouldn’t disengage with them or be angry with them,” says Botticelli. “So I do think it aligns our scientific understanding that addiction is a disease and not a moral failure.”This story is part of NPR’s partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more