YouTube comments hidden by default in companys new test

first_imgWill YouTube say no comments? Sergei Konkov/Getty Images YouTube’s comments section can be a mix between no man’s land in a war zone and the Wild West. Translation: The place can be dangerous. So instead of making you read what the New Statesman called “the worst of the internet,” YouTube is working on a new feature that would hide comments by default.YouTube didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment but it confirmed the test in a statement to TechCrunch on Friday. “This is one of many small experiments we run all the time on YouTube, and we’ll consider rolling features out more broadly based on feedback on these experiments,” the Google-owned site told the publication. XDA developers had spotted the test in India on Wednesday. You have to scroll past engagement buttons and recommended videos to find the comments section on Android and iOS now, but the new test reportedly hides the comments section entirely. Comments would instead be accessible by clicking a new icon, beneath the video and to the right of the thumbs-down icon. Comments could also be found by scrolling past the recommended videos, like before, but you’d have to tap to see them. It remains to be seen whether a user’s engagement with a video would drop if comments were hidden.  Comment YouTube banning supremacist and hoax videos, Amazon unveils… CNET Apps Today Share your voice Tags Now playing: Watch this: 1:12 1 Mobile Software Mobile Apps YouTubelast_img read more

Minor girl gangraped beheaded by brothers uncle in Madhya Pradesh

first_img Close 6-year-old girl raped by servant in Amroha IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:08/1:09Loaded: 0%0:08Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-1:01?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img The victim’s body was found the next day in an agricultural field outside the village.[Representational image] Creative CommonsA 12-year-old Dalit girl was kidnapped, gang-raped and beheaded allegedly by her brothers and uncle in Madhya Pradesh’s Sagar district on Thursday, March 14. According to police, four of the accused have been arrested and one is absconding. The police have charged three of her brothers, her uncle and aunt for the heinous crime. One of the accused arrested is a minor.The girl, a class 6 student, did not return from school the previous day i.e. Wednesday. Her family started looking for her but failing to locate her the girl’s father filed a “missing” complaint with the police in the district.Her body was found the next day in an agricultural field outside Berkhedi village. Initially, the police declared a reward of Rs 10,000, which was increased to Rs 25,000 for information regarding the accused.”On March 14 at around 7 pm the headless body of the girl was found lying close to her village and her severed head was found around 50-100 meters away,” the ASP of Sagar district said. According to reports, when the girl threatened to inform the police, the accused raped her, strangled her to death, chopped off her head and dumped the body.The police doubted after the girl’s uncle alleged that one Chote Patel, who lives in the same village, had killed her. Patel and the family were locked in a land dispute, he informed the police. The body was sent for post mortem examination to the hospital in Banda town. The report revealed that the girl was raped.The girl’s uncle tried to mislead investigators but more questioning disclosed the involvement of the girl’s relatives in the horrific crime.WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED?The victim was allegedly taken by one of her brothers to their uncle’s place when she was returning home from school. The uncle, accompanied by his two sons, allegedly gang-raped her and when she threatened to go to the police, her aunt allegedly strangled her. She was then beheaded and dumped in the fields.The blood-stained clothes of the girl and the weapon used to murder her was also recovered. Further investigation is underway and the police are trying to locate the girl’s another brother.last_img read more

Queen Elizabeth and the royal treasury will be taxed extra because of

first_imgThe Duchess Of Sussex Undertakes Her First Official Engagement With Queen Elizabeth IIPhil Noble – WPA Pool/Getty ImagesYes, she is a member of the royal family in Britain and that should make her a citizen of UK but since the Duchess of Sussex has not renounced her citizenship of her home country, it might cause monetary headache to the royal family.Since she is still a citizen of the United States of America, the US law still recognizes Meghan Markle as a tax paying citizen of the nation. In an interview to CNN, American Tax Return Ltd. founder David Treitel revealed that the way taxation works in the US could force Markle, who is still a US citizen and holds onto an American passport, to pay taxes on income she, as well as her baby, make as members of the royal family.Ultimately, the tax system in the United States—the law says all income everywhere is taxed unless it’s exempt,” he said, explaining that compensation for personal injury is exempt. Otherwise, “most income everywhere is taxed so if the baby has income, Meghan has an income, they are taxed.” Meghan MarkleGetty ImagesWhat poses a bigger problem is that the taxes can also be collected on account of royal family heirlooms and jewellery that Meghan Markle borrows. This will become a big headache for the Queen for she has occasionally allowed Meghan to borrow jewellery that belongs to the royal family.”The Queen has to sit there and her advisors have to sit there thinking ‘what if I lend Meghan a tiara? If I have the baby use a beautiful silver rattle that was used by Queen Victoria?’ How much is that worth? What’s the value of it? How much should be reported to the state? It’s a tough question, not easy,” David added.Already Meghan Markle has used taxable items like her wedding ring from Princess Diana’s collection. Even the residence in Frogmore Cottage can be reported to the US for tax purpose. This is not the first time that the Duchess of Sussex is being reported for tax purposes. When she got married to Prince Harry, it was reported that Meghan’s income will be doubly taxed due to her status as a US citizen, living in the UK.last_img read more

Abhinandan could start flying fighter jets soon Bengalurubased group to take final

first_imgIAF Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman will return to the cockpit and resume flying soon.Indian Air Force braveheart Abhinandan Varthaman, who was captured by Pakistan last month and returned to India two days later, could once again fly fighter jets after he is given final clearance by the Bengaluru-based Institute of Aerospace Medicine (IAM). As per reports, there’s a fine chance that the 35-year-old IAF hero will return to the cockpit and resume flying soon.As per laws governing the Indian troopers, any serving officer who has recently returned from enemy captivity has to undergo a series of tests. It is believed that Abhinandan, too, will have to undergo all kinds of training all over again before he can take to the skies again.Abhinandan joins his squadronIAF Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman has gone back to his squadron in Srinagar though he is on sick leave for four weeks. The IAF pilot preferred to stay with his squadron in Srinagar than spending time with his family in Chennai while on leave. Varthaman was on leave for few days after the security agencies completed a nearly two-week debriefing after his return from the nuclear-armed neighbour Pakistan.The IAF Wing Commander returned home on March 1 after his MiG 21 Bison crashed during a dogfight with Pakistan. Upon ejecting out of his crashed aircraft, Abhinandan landed at Horan village in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. Over 50 hours later, the IAF pilot finally returned to the Indian soil.After Abhinandan was released by Pakistan, defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman met him at a military hospital in New Delhi.In a nutshellTensions between India and Pakistan escalated after Indian fighters bombed terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed’s biggest training camp near Balakot sector, deep inside the Pakistani soil on February 26. Pakistan retaliated by attempting to target the Indian personnel the very next day. However, the IAF thwarted their plans.The Indian strike on the Jaish-e-Mohammed camp came two weeks after the terror group claimed responsibility for a suicide attack on a CRPF convoy in Kashmir, killing 40 troopers. Indian Air Force pilot Abhinandan Varthaman held his head high and crossed over to the Indian side Closecenter_img IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:03/0:55Loaded: 0%0:03Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:52?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …last_img read more

China hails courage of North South Korean leaders

first_imgNorth Korea`s leader Kim Jong Un (L) and South Korea`s President Moon Jae-in (R) pose for a photo during their summit in the Peace House building on the southern side of the truce village of Panmunjom on 27 April. Photo: AFPChina on Friday heaped praised on the leaders of the two Koreas for holding a landmark summit, calling their handshake over the Military Demarcation Line that divides the peninsula a “historic moment”.“We applaud the Korean leaders’ historic step and appreciate their political decisions and courage,” foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying told a regular press briefing.“We hope and look forward to them taking this opportunity to further open a new journey of long-term stability on the peninsula.”She also cited a poem that reads: “We remain brothers after all the vicissitudes; let’s forgo our old grudges, smiling we will meet again.”China is North Korea’s sole major ally but it has supported a series of United Nations sanctions to punish Pyongyang over its nuclear and missile tests.Beijing has pressed for dialogue to peacefully resolve the nuclear crisis.last_img

New Indian envoy to arrive 1 Mar

first_imgIndian high commissioner to Bangladesh Riva Ganguly Das. Photo: UNBNewly appointed Indian High commissioner to Bangladesh Riva Ganguly Das is scheduled to arrive in Dhaka on Friday to take up her assignment, said a diplomat on Wednesday, reports UNB.Riva Ganguly, a senior diplomat, was serving as the director general of Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR).Harsh Vardhan Shringla, who was Indian High commissioner here, is now Indian ambassador to the United States of America (USA).Born on 24 December 1961, Riva Ganguly obtained a postgraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Delhi in 1984.She later taught Political Science at the University of Delhi before joining the Indian foreign service in 1986.last_img

Greece wildfires death toll rises to 91

first_imgThe wreckage of a burnt car is pictured on the sea side of the village of Mati, near Athens, on 28 July, 2018, after Greece`s worst wildfires killed 88, many of them children, on 23 July. Photo: AFPGreek fire services on Sunday said three more people were confirmed killed by the wildfires that have devastated seaside resorts near Athens, bringing the death toll in the disaster to 91.Another 25 remain missing, said spokeswoman Stavroula Malliri, giving a precise figure for the first time after mounting criticism over the issue.But some or all of the missing may be among 28 victims whose bodies are currently being examined by forensic pathologists and have not been identified, civil protection spokesman Spyros Georgiou told AFP.Several children — the total is not yet known — have become the face of the tragedy, including nine-year-old twin girls, a six-month-old infant, a brother and sister aged 11 and 13, and another 13-year-old.Four foreign victims have so far been identified including a young Irishman on his honeymoon, a Polish woman and her son, and a Belgian man whose daughter was rescued.A picture taken on 28 July, 2018 shows the outside of a villa in Mati, near Athens, where three children and their grandparents were found dead after Greece`s worst wildfires killed 88, many of them children, on 23 July. Photo: AFPFinger-pointing over the authorities’ handling of the crisis intensified on Sunday as the rightwing and centrist opposition accused the government of initially trying to hide the loss of human life.The fire services on Sunday continued to probe the causes of the wildfires, with the government suspecting criminal origins.The daily Kathimerini said that an initial report pointed to criminal negligence on the part of a resident who lit a bonfire of dead leaves and branches.last_img

Belgacom added 65000 TV subscribers in the first

first_imgBelgacom added 65,000 TV subscribers in the first quarter of the year and said that “solid revenue growth for TV” helped to boost underlying core revenue. Announcing its Q1 results, the Belgian telco said that its TV customer base reached 1.66 million customers, up 9.4% year-on-year.“The first-quarter 2015 TV revenue grew by 14.8% to €79 million, as a result of continued subscriber growth, and TV-options such as football subscriptions and TV-replay,” said Belgacom.The company said that recurring TV ARPU grew by 6.1% year-on-year to €19.90, driven by the increased uptake of TV options.Overall, Belgacom said that underlying first quarter revenue came to €1.479 billion, an increase of 5.5% compared to the first-quarter of 2014. Underlying group EBITDA totalled €423 million, 3.8% higher compared to the previous year.last_img read more

Todays article comes to us from Dr Joel Wade a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from Dr. Joel Wade, a world traveler, former NCAA champion and highly regarded specialist in the study of true happiness (rather than the superficial nonsense touted by today’s pop psychologists).] It’s good to have a back-up plan, or a plan B, especially in uncertain times; but it’s also important to remember that this is only for when your plan A is threatened. Often, the best thing you can do is to fully commit to your primary vision; sometimes the best defense is a good offense. It’s excellent to have a plan that you can fall back on if things don’t work out, but today, I want to talk about some elements of committing to your plan A (i.e. staying put) that can be easily neglected… because we take them for granted. If you’re thinking of moving away from your home, be it out of state or out of the country, before you do so, consider what you will be leaving behind. If you have family and friends where you live, if you have neighbors whom you know and who know you, those relationships can be a tremendous source of security and support. If you’ve always had these people in your life, you may not even think how much you depend on your connection with them. I don’t just mean that you know you could ask them for help if you need it; there is something extremely valuable, for your health and happiness and overall wellbeing, to having regular human contact with people whom you know and trust. Relationships are built on trust. You can enjoy any positive interaction with a fellow human being, even if it’s a friendly hello at the grocery store or a smile as you walk by on the street. But when you know and trust people and see them in person, make eye contact, shake hands or hug, and can settle into a comfortable conversation, the positive benefits are huge. If you intend to move away from these relationships, it’s important to acknowledge and accept that you will be losing something valuable. Our relationships can be the most fundamental source of joy and satisfaction in life. The positive contact we have with people improves our heart rate variability and our immune system and reduces inflammation. It also just plain feels good. Also, your long term, trust-based relationships are people who are more likely to be there for you – and you for them – if trouble strikes. When our kids were little, we talked about whom they know in the neighborhood. If there was ever any trouble, which houses could they run to? Which neighbors do we know well enough to trust? There were (and are) many to choose from, but a few top the list. That’s a great thing to have when there are kids involved, but it’s still important if there’s just one or two of you. We have neighbors across the street who are well into their 80s. They are two of the people whom our kids knew they could trust and go to if there was ever trouble. They’re our friends. We take time with them, and keep an eye on them, and if they need anything, they know they can ask us. That’s good for them, but it’s also good for us. It’s great to have people you trust, but it’s also deeply satisfying to be somebody who is trustworthy. That’s what true friendship is built on. It’s that mutual sense of trust that takes time and experience to build. If you’re thinking of moving, and doing so includes leaving town, be sure to factor in the loss of contact and support, and the loss of years and possibly decades of earned and established trust with people whose relationships you may have, to some degree, taken for granted. Another element of your plan A that can be overlooked is familiarity. If you’ve lived somewhere for a long time, you know things about the area that you didn’t when you first moved there. You know the roads, the stores, the restaurants. You know the terrain, the weather; you know the nearby towns. You probably know some “secret” driving routes to avoid traffic. You also probably know who puts on a good roof, or can take care of a plumbing or electrical problem dependably. Of course you can learn all of this over time in a new location. But you know them now right where you are. Then there’s the political aspect. If we are to have a country that values individual liberty and self-responsibility – and true win/win capitalism, as opposed to win/lose crony capitalism – it is people who need to advocate, argue, and fight for this, right here at home. What the Tea Partiers have been focused on during the past couple of years is mostly at the local, grassroots level. If you happen to be a high profile, politically active, charismatic person with high name recognition nationally or throughout your state, you may be able to have a big impact – as people like Senators Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and others are having now. But most of us do not have that big of a national presence. Where we can have a big impact, though, is locally, among the people and the community who knows us and trusts us. Effective persuasion does not come through bullying, nagging, or threatening. Effective persuasion comes through building relationships of trust and respect. When people know you, trust you, and respect you, they are more likely to listen to what you have to say. You may have a greater sphere of influence within your own community than you realize, because you may not think much about all of the daily contact you have with different folks. A friend of mine once said, “If you want to have a successful business, don’t move.” By living your life with benevolence and integrity, by settling into a place and treating people well over time, you build for yourself a community of people with whom you share trust, respect, joy, and history. You build for yourself a home. That is a successful plan A. And it’s a much more valuable resource than you might think. You can move somewhere else, and build it there, too, but it takes time, effort, and patience. If that’s necessary, or if you weigh all the options and moving away is the best one, that’s fine; just make sure that in pursuing your plan B, you’re not casting aside a perfectly good plan A. [Joel F. Wade, Ph.D. is the author of Mastering Happiness. He is a marriage and family therapist and life coach who works with people around the world via phone and Skype. You can get a FREE Learning Optimism E-Course if you sign up at his website, www.drjoelwade.com.] FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

The Internet is full of stories about politicians

first_imgThe Internet is full of stories about politicians acting badly and doing the opposite of what they promised. Talk radio is full of the same things, all day, every day. Even around office water coolers, almost everyone will admit that politicians are liars and thieves. Given all of this, it’s rather bizarre that people still believe and obey the bums. If we knew such things about a neighbor, would we continue to take them seriously? Yet, for some reason, politicians get a permanent pass on anything stupid they do. The first reason for this is simply that most people have been bamboozled. They were taught that government is necessary and that without it, we’d all be ignorant savages, eating whatever few berries and roots we could scrounge… that without government nothing would be built, nothing invented, and nothing taught. That’s all propaganda, of course, paid for by the people it praises. But, it’s what we were all taught and it’s hard for people to let it go, no matter how stupid it is. The second reason is that people are afraid. We all know why. None of that, however, is what I want to cover today. Instead, I want to look at the subtle reasons why people can’t let go of “politics.” These reasons are very powerful, but they lie beneath the surface and are harder to identify than self-serving, government-funded BS. Reason #1: I Can Blame Anyone but Me Somehow, people all across the West have become pathologically afraid of blame. It probably began as a corrosive fear of hell: If I’m to blame for anything, I’ll go to hell, and that must be avoided. But be that as it may, this fear of blame allows political parties to provide a highly desirable service: They help you assign all blame to others. If you like the Red party, you can always affix blame to the Blues and not to yourself. If you’re in the Blue party, you can lay all blame onto the Reds. It’s actually an elegant scam. The Blue v. Red show lets everyone avoid taking any blame onto themselves, while the big machine keeps right on running. This fear of blame is ridiculous, of course: We’ve all made mistakes. What matters is correcting them and not repeating them. But if we pretend we never make mistakes, nothing gets fixed and the problems continue. This neurotic avoidance of blame puts politicians in wonderful position – they don’t actually have to solve anything, and any blame is deflected to their evil opposition. Reason #2: It Makes Me Feel Brave at No Expense Politics lets us pretend that we’re fixing problems at no expense, save talking. Actually doing something is not required. Politics empowers our mere words to generate powerful results. At least that’s what people want to believe. It’s the easy way out. You never have to get up and act. You never have to take a real risk. No blood, no sweat, no tears. This is just another scam, of course: The politicians continue do what they want, and the people keep right on believing, even though their words seldom generate any real results. All they need to do is keep you in the game. So long as you keep hoping that your words will affect the future, they can do whatever they please. The alternative would be taking responsibility onto yourself and acting on your own. Gain would require pain… precisely the thing that people want to avoid. So, instead, they keep believing that politics will magically turn complaints into results, and they remain tied into the system, no matter how badly it fails them. Reason #3: It Makes Me Feel Noble at No Expense Politics lets you pour charity onto the targets of your choice, without any personal expense. The magical money pot in the capital city dispenses it, and you feel no pain. It doesn’t matter what your target of choice is, by the way. For some, it’s “the less fortunate,” to others, it’s people on another continent. It really doesn’t matter, aside from the fact that it makes you feel good to help people and that you never have to put your hand into your own pocket. Again, this is clearly a scam: The money comes from ourselves (in ways we don’t think about), from others (those super-rich people), or, primarily these days, from generations yet unborn in the form of state debt. But, those are things that can be ignored, and politicians are always quick to help us ignore them. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

first_img— – Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry DirectorSean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Get Ready:This Wednesday at 8 pm, Porter Stansberry, founder of Stansberry Research, will host an exclusive live webinar called: “How to Profit from the Greatest Transfer of Wealth in History.” You won’t want to miss this… click here to reserve your seat. Critical Warning to Anyone Who Was Born Before 1969We just got exclusive information obtained from an “invitation-only” meeting in Washington, D.C. Some of the most powerful people in finance gathered behind closed doors to discuss a secret deal… one that could have a major impact on your finances, especially if you were born before 1969. If you’re a senior and rely on the government for income, you’ll be badly hurt if this deal gets inked. Click here to see the details. – Recommended Links Doug: Scandinavia is on a slippery slope. I wouldn’t be surprised if a very nasty “black swan” the size of a pterodactyl landed there. The U.S. isn’t far behind. Big Brother is coming out of the cellar, where he’s been chained up, in the U.S. And I’m afraid he’s so strong and nasty that few people will be able to pay him enough to leave them alone.There have long been local pockets of notorious corruption in the U.S., of course; building inspectors, people like that. On a national level, the DEA became very corrupt early on, a natural consequence of “regulating” an industry that runs on billions in cash.Other federal agencies are more subtly corrupt. Generals are paid off by being hired by defense contractors after they’re mustered out. FDA types are hired by the drug companies and large agribusinesses, and executives from those companies become high-level bureaucrats in the FDA. Politicians rarely take envelopes of cash anymore. They wait until they are out of office to collect millions in directors’ fees, book deals, speaking tours, stock deals, and the like. Bill Clinton is a perfect example of someone who went from near penniless to a net worth of $50 million-plus overnight. The Clintons have made a huge leap from the days when Hillary had to take a $100,000 payoff in the guise of her totally transparent cattle-trading scheme.The problem now, though, is that there are giant police bureaucracies like the TSA and the FBI that have no direct way of getting paid off. So they enforce the idiotic laws like robots. Other bureaucracies like NSA do their damage remotely, too far from the victim to be negotiated with. This is a real source of danger.Doug Casey is a multi-millionaire speculator and the founder of Casey Research. He literally wrote the book on profiting during economic turmoil. Doug’s book, Crisis Investing, spent multiple weeks as number one on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the best-selling financial book of 1980. Doug has been a regular guest on national television, including spots on CNN, Merv Griffin, Charlie Rose, Regis Philbin, Phil Donahue, and NBC News.Doug and his team of analysts write The Casey Report, one of the world’s most respected investment advisories. Each month, The Casey Report provides specific, actionable ideas to help subscribers make money in stocks, bonds, currencies, real estate, and commodities. You can try out The Casey Report risk-free by clicking here. L: It’s interesting: These countries where a high degree of legal regulation seems to work are also highly homogeneous and have very powerful cultures; makes you wonder if the laws are really doing anything at all, or if they are just window dressing on more powerful social systems.It makes me think of the many experimental societies tried out in the 19th century in the U.S., when there were still open frontiers to which one could escape with like-minded people and try to do things differently. Most were communes. And most were disasters. Some worked, and a few even still exist in vestigial form today, like the Amana colonies. Those that worked best were religious communes. Just goes to show that if you can go beyond homogeneity and get unanimity, you can create a society that seems to defy all experience to the contrary. When everyone buys in, amazing things can happen…at least for a while.Doug: Almost anything can work for a while. Some monasteries approach an almost perfect state of communism. It’s possible because everyone there chooses to be there and live according to those rules. Unanimous consent. But that’s not possible in an entire country, and even the super-majority buy-in of highly homogeneous cultures like New Zealand and Scandinavia is not possible in 98% of the rest of the countries in the world. If you look at the rest of the world, the more socialistic and regulated the country, the more corrupt it tends to be. And the larger the country, the more disparate the population and divergent the mores, the less effective the government’s regulation.L: That would cover China, Russia…Brazil, Mexico.Doug: And Argentina, where I am now. The customs inspectors down here, for example, all expect to retire as multimillionaires. That’s because they have so many laws on what you can export or import…how, when, and why, it’s almost impossible to comply with, or even know, all the laws. It’s much cheaper and easier to get the inspector to look the other way with a well-placed envelope.There’s good news and bad news in this.In itself, corruption is a bad thing; it shouldn’t have to be necessary. As I touched on earlier, insofar as it’s necessary, it’s also a good thing. If we can’t eliminate the laws that give rise to corruption, it’s a good thing that it’s possible to circumvent these laws. The worst of all situations is to have a mass of strict, stultifying, economically suicidal laws…and also have strict, effective enforcement of those laws. If a culture doesn’t allow people to work around stupid laws, that culture’s doom is further sealed with every stupid law passed, which is pretty much all of them.L: Strict laws, strictly enforced, is a recipe for paralysis. I’ve often said that while Mexico is much less free than the U.S. on paper, it is much more free in fact. People in the U.S. fear their government, especially the IRS. In Mexico, people build what they want, eat what they want, sell what they want; tax evasion is the national pastime.Doug: Right. This is one of the reasons why, though I’ve lived in New Zealand quite a bit over the last 10 years, I’m not really interested in hanging my spurs there any longer. Although it’s gotten vastly better since the reforms of the mid-’80s, it’s still a dull, insular place with a lot of ingrained socialist attitudes, but not much corruption to help you obviate them. And I wouldn’t want to live in the Scandinavian countries either.They have all these incredibly stupid laws that sheep-like residents obey, enabling great tyranny, but it goes unrecognized because it has such popular support. It suits me much better to live in a place like Argentina, where there’s an equal number of stupid laws, but nobody pays any attention to them. And when there is a problem, it can most often be handled, informally.L: I won’t ask you on the record if you’ve ever actually done that. Interesting comment about Scandinavia: I was just reading Google News yesterday, and one of the top video news stories was a clip about some poor woman in Sweden who’s had her twin daughters taken away by the child protection busybodies. The children were taken, without notice, from their school, and the woman didn’t even know it was an official abduction until she got a letter a week later. The real horror of it is that there isn’t actually any evidence of wrongdoing on the woman’s part. The law is preemptive and protective; the bureaucrats are authorized to remove children from their families if there might be danger to them. No due process, and forget about “innocent until proven guilty.” The breathtaking assumption is that it’s better to rip children out of their families than to find out if there’s a real problem first. This could only hold sway in a place where the culture is one of great confidence in the wisdom and benevolence of the state. “They’ll do everything they can to push the price of gold down.”This statement was made by keynote speaker and trend forecaster Gerald Celente at the 2015 Casey Research Summit. Find out what Mr. Celente has to say about gold manipulation…the Federal Reserve’s hidden scheme…and how you can protect yourself from it right here. (Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)This interview was first published on February 9, 2011Editor’s Note: In yesterday’s Weekend Edition, Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why laws and regulations can’t stop corruption. Today, Doug explains why corruption in government can actually be a good thing….Louis James: I think the point of government-sponsored irresponsibility is particularly important, and often overlooked.I’ve long thought that it was FDR’s New Deal that really pushed America over the edge, not so much because of the economic cost, but because it made it very clear to people that they did not need to be responsible for themselves. Big Brother now takes care of them when they get old, or should they fall ill, or lose a job; no need to plan ahead or save… It’s no wonder our culture has transformed from one of individualism and self-reliance to one of groupthink and reliance on the state, populated by entitlement-minded couch potatoes.But what do you say to people who point to places like Sweden, a highly government-regulated society that seems to work? Such a nice, clean place, with lots of government.Doug: It’s a good point. Sweden is at the low end of the corruption scale, but it’s not because they have laws against corruption; everybody has those. It’s because of the culture; the peer pressure, moral opprobrium, and social approbation I mentioned earlier. Sweden is a small country where word of misdeeds spreads quickly. It has a highly homogeneous culture based on deep-rooted traditions, and there’s a high degree of consensus about how things should be. That makes Swedes cooperate with the large body of law that reflects that consensus, much more than would happen almost anywhere else, or is even possible anywhere else.Out of a couple hundred countries in the world outside of Scandinavia, I can think of two other places that have a similarly powerful culture that makes a “big-government” approach to managing society seem to work: New Zealand and Uruguay. These places are small, relatively isolated, homogeneous, and with powerful cultural traditions that have, unfortunately, been codified into law. These countries, coincidentally, also have the three oldest socialist governments in the world, all dating back to the turn of the 20th century. Trying to bribe officials in these places, even Uruguay, is pretty much out of the question.But these places are anomalous. Because of their rare characteristics, they can’t be held up as role models for other places. Almost everywhere else, where there’s more diversity of ethnicity, culture, much larger population, and so forth, Scandinavian socialism wouldn’t even have the appearance of working. And, I’d argue, it won’t work much longer in Scandinavia either; Sweden and these other places will ultimately collapse under the weight of their mass of laws and socialist intervention in their economies. Recommended Links —last_img read more

It was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 am

first_imgIt was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 a.m. on a January morning. Her son Jeff had been caught using drugs in a New Hampshire sober home and was being kicked out.Bea and her husband, Doug Duncan, drove north that night nine years ago to pick Jeff up. On the ride back home, to Natick, Mass., the parents delivered an ultimatum: Their son had to go back to rehab, or leave home.Jeff chose the latter, Bea says. She remembers a lot of yelling, cursing and tears as they stopped the car, in the dead of night, a few miles from the house.”It was really, really difficult to actually just drop him off in a parking lot on our way home and say, ‘you made the decision — no rehab — so we made the decision, no home,’ ” Bea says. “It was exquisitely difficult.”Doug Duncan says many parents had told him to expect this moment. He remembers them saying their son would have to “hit rock bottom; you’re going to have to kick him out of the house.”Two torturous days later, Jeff Duncan came home. Although he returned to rehab, the Duncans decided their approach wasn’t working. They sought help, eventually connecting with a program that, instead of tough love, stresses empathy: CRAFT or Community Reinforcement and Family Training.”There was more compassion and, ‘Wow, this is really difficult for you’; more open questions to him instead of dictating what he should and should not behave like,” says Bea. Many drug users say, in hindsight, they’ve appreciated being forced into treatment. But studies show that a compassionate approach and voluntary treatment are the more effective ways to engage drug users in recovery and keep them alive. That’s a critical consideration for families in this era of fentanyl, a powerful opioid that can shut down breathing in seconds.”The concept of letting their children hit bottom is not the best strategy,” says Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Because in hitting bottom they may die.”After they went through CRAFT training, the Duncans say things started to shift from chaos to calm.”I started to feel an immense sense of relief,” Bea says. “I stopped feeling like I had to be a private investigator and controlling mom. I could kind of walk side-by-side with him on this journey, instead of feeling like I had to take charge of it.”For the Duncans, the approach meant they could switch from enforcing family consequences, like kicking Jeff out of the house, to supporting him as he faced other challenges, like losing a job because of his drug use.It worked well: Bea and Doug helped Jeff stick to his recovery. He’s 28 now and has been sober for nine years.But desperate parents often don’t know how to avoid “hitting bottom” with their children, as the Duncans did on that dark and frigid January morning. The Duncans have found ways to help others: Doug is a parent coach through the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which is now collaborating with the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center.The collaboration will close a gap in services for families caught up in the opioid epidemic, says Grayken Center’s director, Michael Botticelli, who served as drug czar in the Obama administration.”They don’t call this a family disease for no good reason,” Botticelli says. “The whole design of these services [is] to promote tools and information for families, so they know how to approach a situation and can heal.”There is no uniform path to healing for the drug user or parents, and no widespread agreement on the best approach for families.Joanne Peterson, who founded the parent support network Learn to Cope, says there are reasons why some parents ask older children to leave the house — if there are younger children at home or if the parents don’t feel safe.”So it depends on what ‘tough love’ means; it can mean many different things,” Peterson says.She applauds the Grayken Center for expanding access to parent coaches, but “we also need more professional help.” Peterson says she routinely hears from parents who can’t find counselors and doctors who understand their daily traumas.Some critics suggest the CRAFT model is too soft, that it enables drug use.”That’s a misconception,” says Fred Muench, president of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “CRAFT is authoritative parenting, creating a sense of responsibility in the child, and at the same time saying, ‘I am here for you; I love you; I’m going to help you; but I can’t help you avoid negative consequences if you’re not looking to do that on your own.’ “The parent coaching extends beyond periods of crisis.On a recent afternoon, Doug Duncan was on the phone with Doreen, a mom whose daughter is in recovery. (We’re using only Doreen’s first name to protect her daughter’s privacy.) Doreen was upset about an angry text from her daughter that sounded like the messages the young woman sent when she was using drugs.”It brings me back there. In two seconds, I am back on that scene thinking she’s on the heroin, she’s not going to live,” Doreen told Duncan, expressing a very common fear of a loved one’s relapse.In a panic — her daughter had overdosed twice and been rescued — Doreen wanted to ask if she was using heroin again. But she ran it by Duncan first. He encouraged her to talk it through.Doreen paused, then said she could ask her daughter about work — whether it’s been stressful — or about her grief after a friend’s recent death. There are many reasons, Doreen realized, that her daughter might be angry. Her tone didn’t have to signal a relapse.”You talk yourself off the cliff,” Duncan told her.”Oh yes, I know all about that cliff, I’ve visited a few times before,” Doreen said, and laughed. “You know, that ties in with what you said before about focusing less on what your feelings are, and the terror or fear that you’re going through, and more on what they’re feeling and what they’re going through — turn the tables a bit. That’s an excellent point.””That’s true compassion,” Duncan told her, “and oddly enough it’s very therapeutic for you, too.”More compassion in the home fits the shift away from criminalizing addiction — toward accepting and treating it as a chronic medical condition.If a child had cancer, parents “wouldn’t disengage with them or be angry with them,” says Botticelli. “So I do think it aligns our scientific understanding that addiction is a disease and not a moral failure.”This story is part of NPR’s partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more

A group of disabled activists – led by a crossbenc

first_imgA group of disabled activists – led by a crossbench peer – are to intervene in a legal case for the first time next week, in a bid to persuade three high court judges not to weaken the law to allow assisted suicide.Not Dead Yet UK (NDY UK), a campaign group of disabled people opposed to a change in the law on assisted suicide, has been granted the right to intervene in the high-profile judicial review being taken by Noel Conway, who is terminally-ill.Conway is taking a case against the Ministry of Justice, and wants the court to find that the Suicide Act – which makes it illegal to assist someone to take their own life – is incompatible with articles eight (on the right to a private and family life) and 14 (which prohibits discrimination) of the European Convention on Human Rights.NDY UK, led by its founder, the disabled peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell, had just 10 days to put together its legal submission to the high court, after being granted permission to intervene in the case, but even then was only allowed to submit 20 pages of legal arguments.It is now hoping the three high court judges hearing the case will also allow NDY UK to submit a witness statement from Baroness Campbell herself, and permit NDY UK’s barrister, Catherine Casserley, of Cloisters chambers, to respond to the arguments of Conway’s legal team in court.If NDY UK wins the right to be heard orally in court, it could even risk bankruptcy if Conway wins his case and the judges make an order that the campaign group should pay some of his lawyers’ costs.Baroness Campbell and her members were only able to secure their status as interveners in the case because their two lawyers, Casserley and solicitor Chris Fry, of Fry Law, offered to work pro bono.Although they are on the same side as the Ministry of Justice, which is also fighting a change in the law, they are facing a well-funded team from solicitors Irwin Mitchell, backed by the substantial financial resources of the campaign group Dignity in Dying, formerly known as the Voluntary Euthanasia Society.Baroness Campbell told Disability News Service: “This is David and Goliath.“It always tends to be those organisations not run and controlled by disabled people that get the cash. That does stick in the throat a bit.“Whether you agree with assisted suicide, you should have a balanced opportunity to hear both views and I fear the [judges are] in jeopardy of not hearing all the views which [they need] to hear in order to make a good judgement.”It is the first time NDY UK has intervened in a legal case on assisted suicide in the 12 years since it was founded by Baroness Campbell.Their case has relied on disabled activists from NDY UK, the pro bono work of Fry and Casserley, and support from its sister organisation in the USA, Not Dead Yet, and its president and founder, Diane Coleman, as well as law students from both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University.Conway argues that the current law prevents him exercising his right to choice and control over his death.He said earlier this year: “I know I am going to die anyway, but how and when should be up to me.“To have the option of an assisted death in this country would provide me with great reassurance and comfort.“It would allow me to decide when I am ready to go, rather than be forced into a premature death by travelling abroad or be left at the mercy of a cruel illness.”But Baroness Campbell, who plans to attend court for the first day of the judicial review on Monday (17 July), said the prospect of a change in the law was “terrifying”, which was why she and fellow activists had decided that NDY UK must intervene in the court case.In the witness statement – which may not be accepted by the court – Baroness Campbell says that any ruling in favour of Conway would “impact negatively on the lives of other terminally ill and disabled people”.She says it would “damage beyond repair the way in which society views the elderly, sick and disabled to the point where the Equality Act itself and the protection which it provides becomes fundamentally defective”.She adds: “I (and the hundreds of disabled and terminally ill members of NDY UK), want people to understand that it is perfectly possible to have a fulfilling and enjoyable life whilst living with a substantial, progressive condition.”She hopes to tell the court that continuing cuts to health and care services would mean that disabled and terminally-ill people “may become more inclined towards considering desperate options such as assisted suicide”, if it was legalised.The writer and activist Penny Pepper, another NDY UK member, who is quoted in Baroness Campbell’s witness statement, says: “The massive publicity machine working for those who promote assisted suicide drowns out the ‘small voices’ of disabled people who want support to live, not die.”Another member, Felicity Wright, warns that legalisation would destroy the doctor-patient relationship, and that doctors are “amongst the very last people I would trust to have a balanced opinion about the quality of my life”.Baroness Campbell, whose own impairment, spinal muscular atrophy, leaves her in a similar physical situation to Conway, who has motor neurone disease, says she identifies with and understands his fears of the possible death he might face due to an eventual “physical shutdown”.But she says that “parliament has concluded that legalisation would be ‘a dangerous and inappropriate way to tackle end of life fears’”*.She adds: “In every country where assisted suicide has been made legal, original safeguards have been watered down, allowing the parameters to widen and include people that were outside of the original legislation.“There is no reason that this would not happen in the UK, and frankly I predict it will.”Fry, who worked with fellow discrimination law expert Casserley on another high-profile disability rights case, which saw their client Doug Paulley win a ground-breaking legal victory that protected the rights of wheelchair-users to travel on buses, said he felt an “overwhelming sense of responsibility” about the case.He said he had been involved in other high-profile cases which have changed the law – including Paulley’s – but “this is the one that carries for me the greatest sense of personal responsibility because ultimately the issues being decided in this case will affect almost everybody in today’s society”.He said a change in the law would have a “multi-layered impact across the whole of society” and would undermine the Equality Act, which is “founded on the concept that we should do more to empower people and to give an effective right to life and a right to an engaged, fulfilling and accessible and inclusive life.“If you suddenly start saying it’s about the right to die and start unravelling it all, you’re unravelling a quarter of a century of positive equality legislation and case law.“This, for me, is probably the biggest case I will be involved in in my career, because of the significant responsibility that comes with trying to ensure the voices of disabled people are heard as part of this judicial process.”He said there was a “serious threat” that Conway could win, as Dignity in Dying and its lawyers had spent a “significant amount of time and money” in preparing their case since the last attempts to change the law, on behalf of Tony Nicklinson and two other disabled men, ended in failure at the Supreme Court three years ago.Fry said: “This poses a real threat that the law will be changed. If we lose this case and subsequently it gets as far as the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court decides that assisted dying should be legal, that’s it.”In her legal submission to the court on behalf of NDY UK, Casserley warns that the court is being asked to create “a climate in which a disabled person is seen as a burden and the option of a course which involves termination of life becomes routine”.She asks the court to consider not only Conway’s rights, but those of the other disabled and terminally ill people “who will be potentially affected adversely by the Court’s decision and the message that this conveys to them”.She adds: “NDYUK has significant concerns that if society indicates that as a disabled or terminally ill person assisted dying is an option open to them there is a risk of application of internal pressure derived from a value system which views disability negatively.”*Nearly two years ago, the latest attempt to change the law in parliament was heavily defeated, with MPs voting 330 to 118 against a private members’ bill put forward by Labour MP Rob Marris that would have legalised assisted suicide for people said to have up to six months to live.last_img read more

Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods

first_img This story originally appeared on PCMag Add to Queue Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods Why drag someone around a mall when you can leave them happily playing games while you buy stuff? –shares China Enroll Now for $5 Matthew Humphries Image credit: via PC Magcenter_img 2 min read Visiting a mall can be a tiring and frustrating experience, especially if you really don’t like shopping. So one mall in China came up with a solution specifically targeted at all those husbands who accompany their wives but really don’t enjoy shopping.According to the BBC, they are called “husband storage” and take the form of a glass cubicle or pod. Inside you’ll find a comfortable chair and access to a range of video games from the ’90s. Initially use of the pods is free, but there’s plans to introduce a charge payable by smartphone to access and use them. According to Chinese website The Paper, the pods are popular, but also lacking in a few key areas. The biggest complaint so far is a lack of air conditioning, which means you are sitting in a glass cubicle sweating while playing.I think there’s also a missed opportunity here to sell users of the pods cold drinks and snacks. It wouldn’t be difficult to integrate a vending machine into the back or side of the pods, but it could result in greasy gaming pads.If the pods get really popular I can see banks of them being installed just like in internet cafes. Then they can be networked together to allow for multiplayer gaming. Before you know it we’ll have stories about people living out of them while playing online games all day.Social media in China is apparently split on whether the pods are a good idea or not. On the one hand it could encourage partners to go to the mall with their spouse, but on the other, what’s the point if all they are going to do is disappear inside a glass box? July 17, 2017 Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article Senior Editor Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful.last_img read more

Cuba Says US Companies Wont Get Preferential Treatment

first_img Add to Queue This story originally appeared on Reuters Cuba Says U.S. Companies Won’t Get Preferential Treatment Reuters Next Article 2 min read U.S. companies can expect the same treatment as those from the rest of the world, receiving neither special benefits nor punishment, if there is a further commercial opening between Cuba and the United States, Cuba’s foreign trade minister said.”U.S. business people will enjoy the same treatment that is offered to the rest of the world that has ties with the island today,” Rodrigo Malmierca, the minister of foreign trade and investment, said in an interview published in official Cuban media on Monday.”It’s true that we will view positively, once the U.S. laws permit it, that they will be able to trade and invest. But that does not imply a preferential treatment,” Malmierca said.The United States and Cuba announced in December they would restore diplomatic relations and seek to normalize trade and travel that were disrupted more than 50 years ago during the Cold War.U.S. President Barack Obama has relaxed some parts of the U.S. economic embargo against Cuba. Although he has authority to do more, he needs the Republican-controlled Congress to remove the embargo definitively.The opening has generated tremendous interest from U.S. companies looking to crack a market that has long been closed, but even with a relaxation of the embargo U.S. companies need an agreement from the Cuban government or a Cuban state company to do business on the Caribbean island.(Reporting by Daniel Trotta; Editing by Ted Botha) April 6, 2015center_img Image credit: REUTERS | Stringer –shares Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Cuba Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Study highlights eczemarelated disparities in Hispanic and black children

first_img Source:University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine May 23 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)In a study that highlights racial disparities in the everyday impact of eczema, new research shows Hispanic and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to the chronic skin disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania examined more than a decade’s worth of data among children enrolled in a national eczema registry and found Hispanic children were most likely to have missed at least six days of school over six-month period due to their condition. Black children also saw higher probabilities of missed school days compared to white children. JAMA Dermatology published the findings today.Eczema, or atopic dermatitis (AD), is a common inflammatory disease that causes red and itchy skin. It affects about 30 million Americans in total, including up to 20 percent of children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It is more common among black children and slightly more common in Hispanic children when compared with whites. In addition to the physical impact, eczema is associated with negative psychological effects, including an increased likelihood of anxiety and depression.“The effects of eczema are more than skin-deep, and studies have shown that the mental health and social impact of this condition can be significant – sometimes just as much or more than the physical – and may lead to a higher number of school days missed,” said the study’s lead author Joy Wan, MD, MSCE, a post-doctoral fellow and Instructor of Dermatology.Building on that previous research, this study specifically looked at eczema-related school absenteeism by race and ethnicity. Researchers used data on 8,015 patients enrolled in the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER) between November 2004 and July 2017. All patients were between the ages of 2 and 17 and had their AD diagnosed by a doctor. Overall, 241 of them (3.3 percent) missed six or more days of school over a six-month period, which meets the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of chronic school absenteeism. When adjusted for demographic and other variables, data showed Hispanic children were 3.4 times more likely to be chronically absent due to AD than white children. Black children were 1.5 times more likely.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenThe PEER data are self-reported, and the authors say the children included in PEER may not represent the general population with eczema. They say more research is needed to better understand the link. However, they point out this adds to a growing body of work that uncovers disparities related to eczema, including their recent study showing black and Hispanic children are more likely to go to an emergency room and black children are less likely to see a dermatologist for their eczema than white children. Most people don’t realize the serious impact eczema can have on a person’s life, and our research shows minorities may be disproportionately affected. We still have a lot to learn about eczema-related disparities but it’s becoming increasingly clear that these disparities need to be addressed.”Study’s senior author Junko Takeshita, MD, PhD, MSCE, an assistant professor of Dermatology and Epidemiologylast_img read more

Counseling may also benefit parents of depressed teens involved in treatment

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 10 2019Teen depression can affect parents’ marital satisfaction, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found. Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn’t stop with the depressed teen, suggests the studyThe study found that while depressed teens were involved in active treatment, parents’ marriages and parent-child conflict remained stable. Once the teens’ treatment had finished, however, parents’ marital relationships slightly worsened, the study found. Related StoriesBiden calling ACA ‘breakthrough’ for mental health parity highlights gapsHospitals’ decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies is based on insurance typeEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsThe study was a secondary analysis of data from 322 clinically depressed youths who participated in the 2007 Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study, a landmark study on treating adolescent depression. As part of this study, adolescents’ depression was measured during the treatment period, which lasted 36 weeks, and for one year afterward.Source:Northwestern UniversityJournal reference:Howard, K.R. et al. (2019) Marital and Parent-Child Relationships during Treatment for Adolescent Depression: Child-Driven and Bidirectional Effects. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. doi.org/10.1007/s10802-019-00566-x. To address this, Howard and her co-authors recommend that parents of teens who are depressed also have a check-in for their marital relationship.”Families are interactive, fragile ecosystems, and a shift in a teenager’s mood can undoubtedly alter the family’s balance — negatively or positively,” Howard said.While adolescent depression is well known to be a stressor for parents and families, this is one of only a few studies to examine how adolescent depression impacts family relationships and, in turn, how family relationships impact adolescent depression.The study was published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.The study found that parents of teens who had higher depressive symptoms at the end of their treatment experienced more marital problems and more parent-child conflict at later study visits. Conversely, parents whose kids showed fewer depressive symptoms at the end of treatment saw an improvement in later parent-child conflict. This study is important in that very little research has examined the effect of treating teens, with medication or psychotherapy, on family relationships. Findings in this area have been inconsistent, and the effects can be subtle.The take-home message – that teen depression can affect families, and that parents of depressed teens may need support – is entirely sensible. It’s something we should all keep in mind.”Mark A. Reinecke, chief of psychology in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Feinberg Families might be putting their own issues on the back burner while their teen gets help. Once the treatment ends, they’re forced to face issues in their marriage or family that might have been simmering while their depressed teen was being treated.”First author Kelsey Howard, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicinelast_img read more

Unloved Airbus A380s to be stripped for parts

first_imgTwo Airbus A380 superjumbos once flown by Singapore Airlines are to become the first of the iconic doubledeckers to be stripped for parts, after a German leasing firm failed to find a new operator for them. Explore further Citation: Unloved Airbus A380s to be stripped for parts (2018, June 5) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-unloved-airbus-a380s.html The Dr. Peters investment group said Tuesday that despite “intensive negotiations” with several airlines, including British Airways and Iran Air, efforts to find a new lessee proved fruitless.”The market for the A380-800 aircraft type has not developed positively in recent years,” Dr. Peters’ chief executive Anselm Gehling said in a statement. “Some airlines have cancelled orders from Airbus, while others have opted for smaller long-haul jets.”The company will now dismantle the two aircraft over a two-year period before selling the components on the second-hand market, expected to net it some $80 million (68 million euros) per plane.Airbus declined to comment on the decision, but said it still believed in the potential of the A380.”We remain confident in the secondary market for the A380 and the potential to extend the operator base,” it said in a statement.The supersized A380, the world’s largest commercial airliner capable of seating up to 850 passengers, was hailed as the next frontier in air travel when it was rolled out in 2007.But first customer Singapore Airlines returned the planes to the Dr. Peters group after its 10-year lease ended last year, and the two jets have since been parked at Tarbes in the French Pyrenees, according to Bloomberg News.European aviation giant Airbus has long struggled to win customers for the four-engined A380, which airlines have to operate at full capacity in order to make a profit.At the start of the year, Airbus warned it might have to end production of the A380, before Emirates Airlines threw it a lifeline by striking a $16-billion deal for 20 more of the jets with an option on a further 16.The lower than expected demand for the A380 as well as Airbus’s troubled A400m military transporter prompted the group to announce 3,700 job cuts in March. Airbus to get ’10 years of visibility’ from Emirates deal: CEOcenter_img © 2018 AFP Worth more than the sum of its parts? Maybe not This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Haryana bans 10yearold autorickshaws in Gurugram

first_img Next Indo-Asian News Service ChandigarhJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 21:58 IST Manohar Lal Khattar said secretary Regional Transport Authority and Gurugram Traffic Police would jointly prepare policy | File photo from REUTERSHIGHLIGHTSManohar Lal Khattar said if any 10-year-old auto-rickshaw found on road it will be impoundedOrders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over district grievance committee meetingThis policy would be prepared by Gurugram Police Commissioner Muhammad AkilHaryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Saturday announced that more than 10-year-old auto-rickshaws would not be allowed on roads in Gurugram, Haryana.”If such an auto-rickshaw is found plying on the roads it will be impounded,” Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar said.The orders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over the district grievance committee meeting in Gurugram.Manohar Lal Khattar said the Secretary Regional Transport Authority and the Gurugram Traffic Police would jointly prepare a policy for auto-rickshaws plying illegally without registration and carrying passengers more than the specified limit.This policy would be prepared by Gurugram Police Commissioner Muhammad Akil.Also Read | Man masturbates on woman inside Gurugram metro station, cops apologise for delay in actionAlso Read | Journalist sexually harasses domestic help in Gurugram, bookedAlso Watch | Gurugram man drags traffic cop on car’s bonnetFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow GurugramFollow GurgaonFollow HaryanaFollow TransportFollow Manohar Lal Khattar Haryana bans 10-year-old auto-rickshaws in GurugramThe orders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over the district grievance committee meeting in Gurugram.advertisementlast_img read more

Siddaramaiah exudes confidence of winning trust vote says its a joint decision

first_img Next Siddaramaiah exudes confidence of winning trust vote, says it’s a joint decisionSenior Congress leader Siddaramaiah on Friday said the decision to seek a trust vote by the coalition government headed by Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy was taken by the two ruling partners and asserted it has the numbers.advertisement Press Trust of India BengaluruJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 20:00 IST Replying to questions, Siddaramaiah said without numbers or confidence none will seek a trust vote. (Photo: PTI)Senior Congress leader Siddaramaiah on Friday said the decision to seek a trust vote by the coalition government headed by Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy was taken by the two ruling partners and asserted it has the numbers.The Congress Legislature Party Leader also said he had been talking to disgruntled party MLAs barring Roshan Baig because he has been suspended.”Yesterday, we took the decision (on the trust vote) after discussions,” the former chief minister told reporters.Kumaraswamy, whose government is teetering on the brink of collapse after 16 MLAs of the ruling combine resigned, made the announcement about trust vote in the assembly earlier on Friday.Replying to questions, Siddaramaiah said without numbers or confidence none will seek a trust vote.”We have confidence, so we are moving the confidence motion,” he added.On how the ruling combine would muster the numbers, Siddaramaiah said, How can we disclose now? You will come to know when the vote of confidence is moved. Things like how it will happen, who will be present cannot be disclosed now.”To a question, he ruled out the possibility of a counter-operation to the alleged toppling bid of BJP, saying his party did not belive in operations.He refused to comment on the Supreme Court ordering status quo in the matter of resignation and disqualification of ten rebel MLAs.However, he added the Speaker was empowered under the anti-defection law to decide on disqualification of MLAs.Also Read | Karnataka crisis: Will face all issues on floor of House, says CM KumaraswamyAlso Read | Karnataka crisis: No decision on rebel MLAs till July 16, SC tells SpeakerAlso Watch | Kumaraswamy seeks floor test, says he govt has numbersFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShifa Naseer Tags :Follow KumaraswamyFollow Karnataka crisisFollow Siddaramaiahlast_img read more