3 killed, 14 injured as bus hits truck in Maharashtra

first_imgThree people were killed and nearly 14 others injured when a bus hit a stationary truck on the Mumbai-Pune highway here in Maharashtra early in the morning of October 21, a police official said. The mishap took place in Kamshet area around 4 am when the private bus, carrying around 35 passengers, was on way to Kolhapur from Mumbai, he said. The bus driver apparently lost control over the wheels following which the vehicle hit a truck, which was parked on a roadside after it broke down, deputy superintendent of police, Lonavla division, Navneet Kanwat said.“Three people were killed in the mishap. Around 12 to 14 others were injured. They were rushed to a hospital in Talegaon where they were undergoing treatment,” he said.last_img

First Consultation on Child Diversion Policy Set for August 19

first_img The first of four islandwide consultations is to be held at the St. Andrew High School for Girls, in Kingston, on Monday, August 19. Story Highlights The policy seeks to establish a formal framework for dealing with children in conflict with the law The first of four islandwide consultations on the Draft National Child Diversion Policy is to be held at the St. Andrew High School for Girls, in Kingston, on Monday, August 19.Being conducted by the Ministry of Justice, the exercise aims to educate and sensitize the Jamaican public and gain feedback on the policy, which seeks to establish a formal framework for dealing with children in conflict with the law throughout the criminal justice process, with a view to ensuring that detention or institutionalisation is a measure of last resort.Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Justice, Carol Palmer, is inviting members of the public, especially those who work directly with children or those interested in their welfare to attend these sessions, which will run from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. each day.“Anyone who feels they have an interest in justice as meted out to children, can come to those sessions and give us their input which will be considered,” Mrs. Palmer said, while addressing the opening of a consultation for Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) on the draft policy framework, at the Jamaica Conference Centre in Kingston, today (August 15).She noted that while the process to develop this policy on child diversion has been “in gestation for a long time…we are at the point now where we need the insight, the input, and the significant collaboration of stakeholders.”The Kingston session will cater to the parishes of St. Catherine, Kingston and St. Andrew and St. Thomas. The next session will be held on Tuesday, August 20, at the St. Mary High School and will cater to residents of St. Mary, Portland and St. Ann.The West Jamaica Conference Centre in Mount Salem, Montego Bay, will be the venue for the next consultation on Wednesday (August 21). This will cater to the parishes of Trelawny, St. James and Hanover. The final session, scheduled for Thursday(August 22) will be hosted at the St. Elizabeth Technical High School, 90 Main Street, Santa Cruz and will accommodate residents of Westmoreland, St. Elizabeth, Manchester and Clarendon. The exercise aims to educate and sensitize the Jamaican public and gain feedback on the policylast_img read more

Michaelle Jean loses bid to hold onto job as Francophonie secretary general

first_imgYEREVAN, Armenia – Without even her home country supporting her, Michaelle Jean failed in her bid for a second term as secretary general of la Francophonie Friday as members chose Rwandan Foreign Minister Louise Mushikiwabo.Three days after his government withdrew its support for Jean, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insisted the move was not part of a deal to advance Canada’s bid for a United Nations Security Council seat in 2020.“We supported the Rwandan candidate when it was clear that there was a consensus on the part of the African countries, and therefore of la Francophonie,” Trudeau told a news conference as the two-day Francophonie summit closed in the Armenian capital. He praised Jean for her “excellent work” as secretary general.He acknowledged, however, that Canada’s support for Mushikiwabo could prove beneficial at the UN.“We have worked with Africa for a long time, and we continue to work with Africa on many issues, including this request that we have been making for several years for support for the Security Council,” he said. While the Francophonie and UN campaigns coincided, “they are not directly connected,” he added.Mushikiwabo had the backing of France and many African Union countries going into the summit. But in a final attempt to sway the 54 voting members Thursday, Jean warned that rights and democracy shouldn’t take a back seat to partisan ambitions.“Are we ready to accept that international organizations are used for partisan purposes?” Jean asked. “Are we ready to accept that democracy, rights and freedoms are reduced to mere words, that we make them meaningless in the name of realpolitik?”It was a veiled criticism of her only opponent for the job, whose government has been accused of abusing democratic rights and freedom of the press. Rwanda’s president, Paul Kagame, was elected with nearly 99 per cent of the votes in 2017.Trudeau said he had a “frank and direct” discussion about human rights when he met Kagame at the summit Thursday. He said the countries of la Francophonie have “different levels of democracy and different levels of success in the defence of their citizens’ rights.”Named to the post in 2014, Jean was the first secretary general not to come from Africa since the position was created in 1997.Mushikiwabo hailed the return of an African to the office. She said she does not intend to make major changes to the direction of the organization, but she promised more transparency in Francophonie spending.Jean had been dogged by stories of excessive spending and questionable expenses during her mandate.Mushikiwabo did not name Jean in her acceptance speech, but she said “each bill spent is important” and no expense should be taken lightly.Jean spoke briefly Friday, saying she was happy to have advanced the organization of French-speaking nations on the international stage during her time.After a four-year term marked by controversy, the former governor general was considered a long shot for a second stint, but she refused to withdraw her candidacy even as support dwindled.In an interview with The Canadian Press Friday, Kagame pushed back against Jean’s criticism of his country. He said Jean came across as bitter and angry, considering a consensus had formed backing Mushikiwabo.“I think it was outright wrong,” Kagame said. “To tell people who’ve made a choice that they are wrong — that it should be her and not everyone else — in that way, I think it displays the problem.”For Universite de Montreal researcher Jocelyn Coulon, the tense battle over the secretary general post should serve as a lesson to the organization.“The process of selection and appointment of the secretary general is in crisis, as demonstrated by the psychodrama the organization was plunged into for a week,” said Coulon, who was an adviser to former global affairs minister Stephane Dion.“It must be reformed to make it more transparent, which will give more credibility to the person elected.”last_img read more

New Climate Change exhibit draws on latest scientific information about impact of

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 1 2019The Harvard Museum of Natural History announces the new Climate Change exhibit that draws on the latest scientific information about our warming climate, the global and local consequences, and how to both reduce the fossil fuel emissions that cause it and prepare for its effects.This multimedia exhibit includes engaging video and storm simulations, a “check your knowledge” interactive station, and a dramatic inside look at a high-tech Argo float from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution-one of more than 4,000 deployed worldwide to monitor global oceans and climate.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchDeveloped in collaboration with the Harvard University Center for the Environment and informed by new Harvard research, the exhibit offers visitors the hard facts¬¬–the knowns and unknowns–about one of the greatest challenges the world faces.”Climate change is one of the most complicated and challenging problems the world has ever faced” said Professor Dan Schrag, Director of the Harvard Center for the Environment and lead curator of the exhibit. “It is a global problem, and one that requires global action to manage the impacts and minimize the risks. Here at Harvard, we have many researchers who contribute to understanding climate change and working towards solutions. This exhibit is a manifestation of that knowledge, and through our partnership with HMNH, we are able to present some of that to the broader community.” For more perspectives on climate change across economics, public policy, the arts, and more see the videos at https://climatechange.environment.harvard.edu/home#section2.Harvard Museums of Science & Culture Executive Director Jane Pickering said the museums aim to provide a meeting point for scholars and the public. “The Harvard Museum of Natural History has had an exhibit on climate change since 2004,” said Pickering, “but we felt it was imperative at this time to rethink our display. We wanted to connect visitors to the cutting-edge research going on at the university as they consider their own responses to this unprecedented global challenge.” Source:https://hmnh.harvard.edu/climate-change-prlast_img read more

Veterans more likely to have heart disease at a younger age finds

first_img Source:https://www.ucf.edu/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 15 2019After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.These results are published in a new University of Central Florida study appearing in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.”I think it’s sort of the first indications of a coming public health crisis for veterans,” says Ramon Hinojosa, an assistant professor in UCF’s Department of Sociology and the study’s author. “Because of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, we have a relatively large, new, younger generation of veterans who are going to survive for 30 or 40 years after their war experience.”The study indicates that perhaps the “healthy-soldier effect” is no longer guaranteed. The effect refers to the tendency for active-duty service members to be more physically fit and less overweight than same-age, nonmilitary individuals. It’s a phenomenon that Hinojosa explores in ongoing research.”The outcome of the analysis suggested that not only does the healthy-soldier effect not seem as potent as it once was, in fact, what I see is veterans tend to have cardiovascular morbidity earlier than nonveterans, and they tend to have a greater number of conditions,” Hinojosa says.The researcher said the change could be due to the nature of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, modern warfare, changing diets, changing approaches to leisure and exercise, higher rates of obesity in younger veterans than nonveterans at the same age, and higher rates of drinking, smoking and mental illness.In light of these results, Hinojosa said it is important for health practitioners to look closely at cardiovascular health for younger veterans so they can address preventative approaches to ward off early onset of cardiovascular diseases.Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart disease”I think that being aware we sort of have the first rumblings of what seems to be a health crisis will help us focus our attention on health resources and providing younger veterans with access to resources that can help them ameliorate the likelihood of early onset cardiovascular disease,” Hinojosa says.The study used data from the National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative health survey of individuals in the United States that’s conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.Hinojosa looked at five particular cardiovascular conditions reported in the survey and their association with veteran status and sociodemographic status, including age.Responses from 153,556 individuals were used, and the study looked at pooled survey data from 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, the most recent available data at the time.From age 35 to about age 70, veterans reported significantly more cardiovascular conditions than nonveterans. After age 70, nonveterans reported more cardiovascular conditions than veterans.The switch could be due to fewer veterans surviving into older age because of cardiovascular diseases, Hinojosa said.”It’s concerning to know that the physical benefits of military service seem to be not holding as well for the younger veterans,” Hinojosa says. “This suggests the health protective benefits of military service are not what they used to be. I think that should cause us to really look at what’s going on among the veterans after they leave military service.”last_img read more

Counseling may also benefit parents of depressed teens involved in treatment

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 10 2019Teen depression can affect parents’ marital satisfaction, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found. Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn’t stop with the depressed teen, suggests the studyThe study found that while depressed teens were involved in active treatment, parents’ marriages and parent-child conflict remained stable. Once the teens’ treatment had finished, however, parents’ marital relationships slightly worsened, the study found. Related StoriesBiden calling ACA ‘breakthrough’ for mental health parity highlights gapsHospitals’ decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies is based on insurance typeEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsThe study was a secondary analysis of data from 322 clinically depressed youths who participated in the 2007 Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study, a landmark study on treating adolescent depression. As part of this study, adolescents’ depression was measured during the treatment period, which lasted 36 weeks, and for one year afterward.Source:Northwestern UniversityJournal reference:Howard, K.R. et al. (2019) Marital and Parent-Child Relationships during Treatment for Adolescent Depression: Child-Driven and Bidirectional Effects. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. doi.org/10.1007/s10802-019-00566-x. To address this, Howard and her co-authors recommend that parents of teens who are depressed also have a check-in for their marital relationship.”Families are interactive, fragile ecosystems, and a shift in a teenager’s mood can undoubtedly alter the family’s balance — negatively or positively,” Howard said.While adolescent depression is well known to be a stressor for parents and families, this is one of only a few studies to examine how adolescent depression impacts family relationships and, in turn, how family relationships impact adolescent depression.The study was published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.The study found that parents of teens who had higher depressive symptoms at the end of their treatment experienced more marital problems and more parent-child conflict at later study visits. Conversely, parents whose kids showed fewer depressive symptoms at the end of treatment saw an improvement in later parent-child conflict. This study is important in that very little research has examined the effect of treating teens, with medication or psychotherapy, on family relationships. Findings in this area have been inconsistent, and the effects can be subtle.The take-home message – that teen depression can affect families, and that parents of depressed teens may need support – is entirely sensible. It’s something we should all keep in mind.”Mark A. Reinecke, chief of psychology in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Feinberg Families might be putting their own issues on the back burner while their teen gets help. Once the treatment ends, they’re forced to face issues in their marriage or family that might have been simmering while their depressed teen was being treated.”First author Kelsey Howard, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicinelast_img read more