Thieves strike at judge’s house, steal trees in Madhya Pradesh

first_imgA gang of five thieves struck at the residence of Arun Kumar Singh, a district court judge and chopped off four sandalwood trees from the premises, before decamping with the logs, police said on Saturday. Police said Justice Singh and his family members were asleep when the incident took place, adding that the thieves cut the trees after threatening the judge’s police guard at gunpoint.The incident took place during the intervening night of Thursday and Friday, police said, adding that the thieves cut the trees after threatening the judge’s police guard at gunpoint.The police guard, Budhi Lal Kol, lodged a complaint with the police in this regard.“As per the complaint, one of the thieves first entered district and sessions court judge Arun Kumar Singh’s bungalow in Civil Lines area on the intervening night of November 14 and 15. He threatened Kol with a country-made pistol. Soon, four other accomplices joined him and held the guard captive,” City Superintendent of Police Shivendra Singh told PTI.“Within 10 minutes, the accused cut the sandalwood trees and fled with the logs. Total four guards, including Kol, were stationed at different locations at the bungalow when the incident took place. However, the thieves did not harm anyone,” he said.Police said the judge and his family members were asleep when the incident took place. According to Singh, police suspect that the accused were from Uttar Pradesh’s Kannauj, which is home to several manufacturing units of incense sticks and perfumes.“In the past, Rewa police had arrested some people from Kannauj for cutting and stealing sandalwood trees from the city,” the CSP said.“Sandalwood is used in making incense sticks and perfume. The cost of the trees stolen from the judge’s house could be around ₹3 to 5 lakh,” he said. Singh said that police have registered a case in this connection and launched a search to catch the accused.last_img read more

Liberals pass Canada Post back to work bill

first_imgLegislation ordering postal workers back to work was passed in the House of Commons during a special session that dragged on into the wee hours of Saturday morning.Bill C-89 passed third reading by a vote of 166 to 43.The Senate is now set to sit Saturday and, if necessary, Sunday, to deal with the bill, which would go into effect at noon eastern time on the day following royal assent.The legislative push came as Ottawa, as well as smaller towns in Ontario, B.C., and Quebec became the latest targets of rotating strikes by the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.Despite the rush to pass the legislation, Labour Minister Patty Hajdu encouraged Canada Post and CUPW to remain at the bargaining table.“They can still pull a deal off,” she said.That said, Hajdu added: “Obviously, we would prefer that the parties are able to negotiate an agreement together, but the time has come that we need to be prepared to take action if they cannot.”Hajdu referred to mail delivery as an “essential service” and said small businesses that rely on the postal service to deliver their goods over the busy Christmas season could go bankrupt if the situation isn’t remedied quickly.“And when I say small, I mean really small. I mean people that, you know, sell marmalade or handmade goods, that this is the most profitable time of their year and if they are unable to make their earnings this time of year, they very well might be facing the end of their business.”Labour leaders and New Democrat MPs slammed the government for undermining the collective-bargaining process. The government has removed all incentive for Canada Post to reach a negotiated settlement now that the agency knows workers will be ordered back to work by early next week, they charged.“The right to strike is an integral part of the collective bargaining process,” said Canadian Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff. “Without it, an employer has no incentive to bargain in good faith, and workers have no recourse to demand a fair process.”Canada Post seems to have convinced Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that Christmas wouldn’t come without a back-to-work bill, added CUPW president Mike Palecek.“The mail was moving, and people know it,” he said. “People have been getting their mail and online orders delivered. That was the point of our rotating-strike tactics, not to pick a fight with the public.”NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh accused the Liberals of hypocrisy, professing to believe in the right to collective bargaining while bringing in what he called the “worst, most draconian” back-to-work legislation.“They’ve shown their true face … that this government is not a friend of working people,” Singh said.New Democrat MPs voted against the motion to speed up debate on the back-to-work legislation, with many making an elaborate show of walking out of the Commons after voting, raising their fists in salute to postal workers watching from the public gallery. The votes of those who walked out were not counted.Six New Democrats remained in the chamber – representative of the small number the party maintained would get a chance to speak during the subsequent expedited debate on the bill.CUPW maintains the bill is unconstitutional and is threatening to challenge it in court.The union won a court challenge against back-to-work legislation imposed on postal workers in 2011 by the previous Conservative government. The court ruled in 2016 that by removing workers’ right to strike, the bill violated their right to freedom of association and expression.Hajdu argued that her bill is “dramatically different” from the “heavy-handed” approach taken by the Harper government and takes into account the concerns of both the union and Canada Post.But two independent senators, Frances Lankin and Diane Griffin, wrote Hajdu to express their concern that the bill may not be constitutional. The pair said Hajdu had promised to issue a government analysis detailing how the bill does not violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms but it still had not materialized by Friday evening.CUPW members have held rotating walkouts for a month, causing massive backlogs of unsorted mail and packages at postal depots, though Canada Post and the union dispute how big the pileup is.Canada Post says it could take weeks – even stretching into 2019 – to clear the backlog that has built up, especially at major sorting centres in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.CUPW’s 50,000 members, in two groups, are demanding better pay for rural and suburban carriers, more job security and minimum guaranteed hours.Waseem is a letter carrier for #CanadaPost. He tells us why these striking postal workers are in MP Morneau’s Toronto constituency office. #CDNpoli @CityNews @680NEWS pic.twitter.com/bhX5GhbfQo— Tony Fera (@tonyfera1) November 23, 2018last_img read more

How to score TIFF tickets

first_imgIf you’re just getting around to picking up TIFF tickets now, fear not. It’s not too late to score some of the hottest tickets in town.Passes are no longer up for sale, but individual tickets go on sale starting Sept. 4. Regular adult tickets start at $25, “rush” tickets start at $20 and premium screenings start at $49.For the under 25 and over 65 set, regular screenings start at $20 and premium screenings can set you back $38. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Tickets can be purchased online anytime at tiff.net and printed off or downloaded onto mobile devices. You can also purchase tickets by phone at 416-599-TIFF (8433) or toll-free at 1-888-599-8433 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Sept. 7 and from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. during the festival, which runs Sept. 8-18. Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more