LUH dealing with six flu cases a day as visitor ban continues

first_imgLetterkenny University Hospital is dealing with an average of six new cases of flu every day as the crisis continues this week.The public is being urged not to visit the building, as visiting restrictions remain in place again this weekend.Seán Murphy General Manager Letterkenny University Hospital is calling for full cooperation with the safety measures, “We are appealing to people to co-operate with the visiting restrictions so that we can protect the many very sick patients in the hospital. “We are seeing on average 6 new cases of flu in the hospital every day. Patients with flu must be accommodated in isolation to prevent the spread of infection and this is putting severe pressure on the availability of beds for other seriously ill patients who need to be admitted for treatment.“We need the co-operation of the public to protect our patients and prevent the spread of infection from the flu and to minimise the chances of it being brought into the hospital.“Our staff are working very hard to care for the many seriously ill patients in the hospital and we need to do everything we can to support them and protect our patients from additional risks of the flu virus.“Anyone carrying the flu virus can spread it for 1-2 days before developing symptoms and up to 5 days after symptoms develop. You may be spreading the flu and not even know it.” Family will only be allowed to visit in exceptional cases.In exceptional cases only, family members may arrange with the ward manager to visit critically ill patients. To arrange a visit, please call the hospital on 074 9125888 and ask to be put through to the manager on the ward who will decide if a visit can be facilitated without compromising the welfare of the patients on the ward or the welfare of the visitors.Mr Murphy added: “We are appealing to people to co-operate with hospital staff. Visitors who arrive without prior agreement from the ward manager will be asked to leave. This is a necessary to protect the many very sick patients in the hospital who are vulnerable to infection. It is critical that their care and treatment is not further complicated by the flu.”LUH dealing with six flu cases a day as visitor ban continues was last modified: December 15th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

If AI Means The End Of Us, Maybe That’s Okay

first_imgFor a while now I have been wanting to write an essay or even a book with the title, “The Last of Our Kind,” looking ahead to a time when machines become more intelligent than humans and/or humans incorporate so much digital technology that they become post-biological creatures, indistinguishable from machines. Those digitally-augmented descendants will be so different from us as to seem like an entirely different species. What happens to us? Simple “biologicals” might be able to co-exist for a time with our more intelligent descendants, but not for long. Eventually, creatures that we today consider “humans” – creatures like us – will go extinct.At the heart of this line of thinking is the notion that what matters most is intelligence, not biology. What are we humans? At the end of the day we are nothing more than biological containers for intelligence. And frankly, as containers go, biological ones are not ideal. We’re frail, and superstitious. We don’t live very long. We need to eat and sleep. We learn slowly. Each new generation spends years re-learning all the stuff that previous generations have already learned. Some of us get sick, and others then devote enormous resources to caring for the sick ones. It’s all incredibly slow and crude. Progress takes forever.So maybe we are just a stopping point. Maybe the whole point of biological creatures is to evolve into something that generates just enough intelligence to evolve into something else. Maybe our purpose is to create our own replacements. And maybe, thanks to computers and artificial intelligence, we are not far from reaching this huge evolutionary inflection point.What Is To Be Done?Others are thinking along these lines, and even trying to do something about it, as evidenced this terrific essay from the New York Times by Huw Price, a philosopher at University of Cambridge. It’s a long piece but I’ve grabbed some highlights:“I do think that there are strong reasons to think that we humans are nearing one of the most significant moments in our entire history: the point at which intelligence escapes the constraints of biology. And I see no compelling grounds for confidence that if that does happen, we will survive the transition in reasonable shape. Without such grounds, I think we have cause for concern.“We face the prospect that designed nonbiological technologies, operating under entirely different constraints in many respects, may soon do the kinds of things that our brain does, but very much faster, and very much better, in whatever dimensions of improvement may turn out to be available.”Price and many others believe we are nearing the point at which artificial general intelligence is achieved. But this raises profound existential questions for us:“Indeed, it’s not really clear who “we” would be, in those circumstances. Would we be humans surviving (or not) in an environment in which superior machine intelligences had taken the reins, to speak? Would we be human intelligences somehow extended by nonbiological means? Would we be in some sense entirely posthuman (though thinking of ourselves perhaps as descendants of humans)?”The argument that some people put forward is that machines will never be able to do everything a human can do. They’ll never be able to write poetry, or have dreams, or feel sorrow or joy or love. But as Price points out, who cares?“Don’t think about what intelligence is, think about what it does. Putting it rather crudely, the distinctive thing about our peak in the present biological landscape is that we tend to be much better at controlling our environment than any other species. In these terms, the question is then whether machines might at some point do an even better job (perhaps a vastly better job).”Of course machines will do a vastly better job at many things than we humans can do. Machines are already doing that in countless domains. Chess is one example. Stock market trading is another. Imagine what would happen to the world’s markets, and thus to the world’s economy, if tomorrow all the computers were shut off and we went back to doing it by hand. Imagine humans trying to compete side by side in this domain against machine. It’s unfathomable.Trying To Stop The UnstoppablePrice and others are trying to come up with ways to keep this from happening, or to make sure that “good” outcomes are more likely than “bad” outcomes. Toward that end Price has co-founded the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (C.S.E.R.) at Cambridge.I think assigning values like “good” and “bad” to the various possible outcomes of an evolutionary process makes no sense. Evolution happens and we don’t have control over it. Whatever rules some well-wishers might put into place to prevent certain outcomes, others will find ways to work around them. It’s what Yale computer scientist David Gelernter calls “the Orwell Law of the Future,” and it goes like this: Any new technology that can be tried will be.We are on a path, and there is no stopping it. This is neither good nor bad, it just is. Was it bad when single-celled organisms evolved into more complex organisms and then got eaten by them? I suppose the single-celled organisms weren’t psyched about it. But without that process, we humans wouldn’t be here. And if now it is our turn to be erased by evolution, so what? From the perspective of the universe, who cares if humans cease to exist?The great irony in all this is that we can’t stop pushing forward with dangerous technologies (AI, bioengineering) because evolution has hard-wired our brains in such a way that we cannot resist pushing forward, even if the consequence of this ever-upward march of evolution is that we end up rendering ourselves extinct. We humans like to believe that we among all living creatures are special and unique. And we are, if only because we are the first species that will knowingly create something superior to ourselves. We will engineer our own replacements. Which when you think about it is both brilliant and phenomenally stupid at the same time. In other words, perfectly human.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market dan lyonscenter_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#AI A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

Thieves strike at judge’s house, steal trees in Madhya Pradesh

first_imgA gang of five thieves struck at the residence of Arun Kumar Singh, a district court judge and chopped off four sandalwood trees from the premises, before decamping with the logs, police said on Saturday. Police said Justice Singh and his family members were asleep when the incident took place, adding that the thieves cut the trees after threatening the judge’s police guard at gunpoint.The incident took place during the intervening night of Thursday and Friday, police said, adding that the thieves cut the trees after threatening the judge’s police guard at gunpoint.The police guard, Budhi Lal Kol, lodged a complaint with the police in this regard.“As per the complaint, one of the thieves first entered district and sessions court judge Arun Kumar Singh’s bungalow in Civil Lines area on the intervening night of November 14 and 15. He threatened Kol with a country-made pistol. Soon, four other accomplices joined him and held the guard captive,” City Superintendent of Police Shivendra Singh told PTI.“Within 10 minutes, the accused cut the sandalwood trees and fled with the logs. Total four guards, including Kol, were stationed at different locations at the bungalow when the incident took place. However, the thieves did not harm anyone,” he said.Police said the judge and his family members were asleep when the incident took place. According to Singh, police suspect that the accused were from Uttar Pradesh’s Kannauj, which is home to several manufacturing units of incense sticks and perfumes.“In the past, Rewa police had arrested some people from Kannauj for cutting and stealing sandalwood trees from the city,” the CSP said.“Sandalwood is used in making incense sticks and perfume. The cost of the trees stolen from the judge’s house could be around ₹3 to 5 lakh,” he said. Singh said that police have registered a case in this connection and launched a search to catch the accused.last_img read more

Liberals pass Canada Post back to work bill

first_imgLegislation ordering postal workers back to work was passed in the House of Commons during a special session that dragged on into the wee hours of Saturday morning.Bill C-89 passed third reading by a vote of 166 to 43.The Senate is now set to sit Saturday and, if necessary, Sunday, to deal with the bill, which would go into effect at noon eastern time on the day following royal assent.The legislative push came as Ottawa, as well as smaller towns in Ontario, B.C., and Quebec became the latest targets of rotating strikes by the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.Despite the rush to pass the legislation, Labour Minister Patty Hajdu encouraged Canada Post and CUPW to remain at the bargaining table.“They can still pull a deal off,” she said.That said, Hajdu added: “Obviously, we would prefer that the parties are able to negotiate an agreement together, but the time has come that we need to be prepared to take action if they cannot.”Hajdu referred to mail delivery as an “essential service” and said small businesses that rely on the postal service to deliver their goods over the busy Christmas season could go bankrupt if the situation isn’t remedied quickly.“And when I say small, I mean really small. I mean people that, you know, sell marmalade or handmade goods, that this is the most profitable time of their year and if they are unable to make their earnings this time of year, they very well might be facing the end of their business.”Labour leaders and New Democrat MPs slammed the government for undermining the collective-bargaining process. The government has removed all incentive for Canada Post to reach a negotiated settlement now that the agency knows workers will be ordered back to work by early next week, they charged.“The right to strike is an integral part of the collective bargaining process,” said Canadian Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff. “Without it, an employer has no incentive to bargain in good faith, and workers have no recourse to demand a fair process.”Canada Post seems to have convinced Prime Minister Justin Trudeau that Christmas wouldn’t come without a back-to-work bill, added CUPW president Mike Palecek.“The mail was moving, and people know it,” he said. “People have been getting their mail and online orders delivered. That was the point of our rotating-strike tactics, not to pick a fight with the public.”NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh accused the Liberals of hypocrisy, professing to believe in the right to collective bargaining while bringing in what he called the “worst, most draconian” back-to-work legislation.“They’ve shown their true face … that this government is not a friend of working people,” Singh said.New Democrat MPs voted against the motion to speed up debate on the back-to-work legislation, with many making an elaborate show of walking out of the Commons after voting, raising their fists in salute to postal workers watching from the public gallery. The votes of those who walked out were not counted.Six New Democrats remained in the chamber – representative of the small number the party maintained would get a chance to speak during the subsequent expedited debate on the bill.CUPW maintains the bill is unconstitutional and is threatening to challenge it in court.The union won a court challenge against back-to-work legislation imposed on postal workers in 2011 by the previous Conservative government. The court ruled in 2016 that by removing workers’ right to strike, the bill violated their right to freedom of association and expression.Hajdu argued that her bill is “dramatically different” from the “heavy-handed” approach taken by the Harper government and takes into account the concerns of both the union and Canada Post.But two independent senators, Frances Lankin and Diane Griffin, wrote Hajdu to express their concern that the bill may not be constitutional. The pair said Hajdu had promised to issue a government analysis detailing how the bill does not violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms but it still had not materialized by Friday evening.CUPW members have held rotating walkouts for a month, causing massive backlogs of unsorted mail and packages at postal depots, though Canada Post and the union dispute how big the pileup is.Canada Post says it could take weeks – even stretching into 2019 – to clear the backlog that has built up, especially at major sorting centres in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.CUPW’s 50,000 members, in two groups, are demanding better pay for rural and suburban carriers, more job security and minimum guaranteed hours.Waseem is a letter carrier for #CanadaPost. He tells us why these striking postal workers are in MP Morneau’s Toronto constituency office. #CDNpoli @CityNews @680NEWS pic.twitter.com/bhX5GhbfQo— Tony Fera (@tonyfera1) November 23, 2018last_img read more

How to score TIFF tickets

first_imgIf you’re just getting around to picking up TIFF tickets now, fear not. It’s not too late to score some of the hottest tickets in town.Passes are no longer up for sale, but individual tickets go on sale starting Sept. 4. Regular adult tickets start at $25, “rush” tickets start at $20 and premium screenings start at $49.For the under 25 and over 65 set, regular screenings start at $20 and premium screenings can set you back $38. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Tickets can be purchased online anytime at tiff.net and printed off or downloaded onto mobile devices. You can also purchase tickets by phone at 416-599-TIFF (8433) or toll-free at 1-888-599-8433 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. until Sept. 7 and from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. during the festival, which runs Sept. 8-18. Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more