Public health informatics training program announced

first_imgJun 8, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A new program to provide training in the use of informatics to enhance disease detection and other public health functions is being launched with the help of a $3.68 million grant from a private foundation, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today. The grant will support program development at the training sites along with stipends, tuition, and other expenses for trainees, the NIH said. See also: The National Library of Medicine (NLM) will administer the grant. Training will be done at four institutions that already have informatics training programs supported by the NLM: Columbia University, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the University of Utah, and the University of Washington. The programs are scheduled to begin Jul 1, the NIH reported. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has awarded the grant to train students in public health informatics, defined as the practice of integrating computer technology for managing information to enhance the work of public health professionals and others, the NIH said. “Informatics can help us make a huge impact on pubic health through disease surveillance,” said Charles Friedman, PhD, the NLM’s leader of the training initiative, as quoted in the news release. “By integrating health data from a range of sources—including hospitals, clinics, and pharmacies—and applying sophisticated analysis tools, we’ll be able to detect disease outbreaks early, potentially saving lives and preventing an enormous amount of suffering.” Jun 8 NIH news releasehttp://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jun2005/nlm-08.htmlast_img read more

It’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggests

first_imgThe Washington Post 26 May 2017Family First Comment: Interesting findings – and debunks claims that euthanasia is required because of physical pain..“Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”And“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying… Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”But a study released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests the answers may be surprising: The reasons patients gave for wanting to end their lives had more to do with psychological suffering than physical suffering.The study, based on information from Canada’s University Health Network in Toronto, represents all 74 people who inquired about assistance in dying from March 2016 to March 2017. Most were white and were diagnosed with cancer or a neurological disorder like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying law, or MAiD, allows for adults with serious and incurable diseases in an advanced state to seek help. At the University Health Network, which operates four large hospitals, patients must go through several levels of evaluations, and if they meet the criteria, they can come to the hospital to receive a lethal medication intravenously.For many people, death from a terminal illness may be synonymous with pain. Much of the discussion about assisted suicide focuses on compassionate palliative care for cancer patients and about suffering that can’t be controlled by even the strongest opioids. But that’s not what the people in the new study report.“It’s what I call existential distress,” explained researcher Madeline Li, an associate professor at University of Toronto. “Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”“It has been very surprising to me,” Li said in an interview.One of the main things these patients bring up has to do with “autonomy.” It’s a broad philosophical concept that has to do with being able to make your own decisions, not being dependent on others, wanting to be able to enjoy the things you enjoy and wanting dignity.One patient was a marathon runner before her cancer left her confined to bed. “That was not how she saw her identity,” Li said. Another patient, a university professor, identified his intellect as the most important quality that he values in himself: “He had a brain tumor, and he didn’t want to get to the point of losing control of his own mind, couldn’t think clearly and couldn’t be present.”The study also provides information regarding one of the most controversial aspects of physician-assisted suicide: That it could be forced on the poor, uninsured or those worried about being a burden to their loved ones. In Canada, a requirement for being considered for MAiD is being under the national health insurance program, and most of the patients were financially well-off.A study published in 2015 based on interviews with 159 patients or family members of deceased patients in Oregon — which allowed physicians to give prescriptions for self-administered lethal medications in 1997 — found similarly complex psychological motivations for decisions.“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying,” researchers wrote in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “None of the participants cited responding to bad news, such as the diagnosis of cancer, or a depressed mood as motivations for interest in hastened death. Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”Likewise a study in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999 about the first year of the Oregon law noted: “Many physicians reported that their patients had been decisive and independent throughout their lives or that the decision to request a lethal prescription was consistent with a long-standing belief about the importance of controlling the manner in which they died.”READ MORE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/05/24/its-not-pain-but-existential-distress-that-leads-people-to-assisted-suicide-study-suggests/?utm_term=.7d43595fbbb3Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Pochettino’s Tottenham future uncertain

first_img0Shares0000Pochettino is not ready to walk away at this point, but it remains to be seen how long the current working arrangement can go on for. Photo/TEAMTALK MEDIALONDON, United Kingdom, Nov 19 – Mauricio Pochettino’s future at Tottenham has once again come into question after reported talks between the manager and club chairman Daniel Levy.Spurs sit 14th in the Premier League standings following a disastrous start to the season by their lofty standards and it has been claimed that both Pochettino and Levy met to discuss his future during the international break. A decision has yet to be made, but it looks unlikely that Pochettino will see the season out with Spurs and a parting of ways could be on the cards sooner rather than later.Levy is hoping that a mutual agreement can be made between the two as he does not want to sack Pochettino following the fine job he has done during his time at the club.Such a move would also cost him a Sh 1.6 billion  (£12.5million) pay-off to the Argentine, so it is easy to see why there is a stand-off between the two.Pochettino is not ready to walk away at this point, but it remains to be seen how long the current working arrangement can go on for.The Spurs boss was disappointed with the fact Levy failed to move out certain players this summer and bring in new ones, and there has been constant talk of unrest behind the scenes.Pochettino himself has also been quite vocal when claiming the squad is as unsettled as it has ever been, and that is the reason why they have failed to perform this season.If Levy did make the decision to axe Pochettino, there is no suitable caretaker to step straight in and a quick appointment would have to be made.He would be unable to bring in Bournemouth boss Eddie Howe at this time, and would have to target someone who is out of work like Jose Mourinho or Massimiliano Allegri.It is all speculation at this stage, but the clock certainly seems to be ticking on Pochettino’s time at the club.0Shares0000(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more