MBTA To Increase Cost Of Parking At Wilmington Station By 50

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Beginning August 1, the price to park in the MBTA parking lot at Wilmington Station will increase from $4 to $6 on weekdays, and decrease from $4 to $2 on weekends.Wilmington’s parking lot consists of 191 parking spaces. The lot is regularly filled up by 7am on weekday mornings.After reviewing usage at its 99 parking lots and garages, the MBTA recently decided to adjust parking prices at more than half of its facilities.Wilmington is one of 32 MBTA parking facilities that will see a weekday price increase.  21 parking facilities will actually see a decrease in cost, while the cost at 46 parking facilities — including North Wilmington — will remain the same.The MBTA’s Governing Board approved the proposal on Monday, resulting in the MBTA’s first large scale parking price increase in 10 years. The T hopes to generate an additional $6.5 million from this new pricing strategy during its next fiscal year.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedMBTA To Install Solar Panels At Wilmington Center Parking LotIn “Govenrment”SELECTMEN NEWS: Board Grapples With Whether To Eliminate 5 Daily Stops At N. Wilmington Commuter Rail StationIn “Government”MBTA Adds Extra Late-Night Commuter Rail Trains For This Weekend’s Lowell Folk FestivalIn “Government”last_img read more

A type of semitransparent polymer that can be mended at room temperature

first_imgCredit: Yu Yanagisawa A small team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has created a polymer that can be repaired when broken into two parts by applying a small amount of pressure at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they came upon the polymer, how it was made, and how well it can be repaired. Materials may lead to self-healing smartphones This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Journal information: Science The researchers report that to test the material, they cut a small tile into to two pieces, then pressed the two pieces together into the original configuration using just a small force at room temperature. After 30 seconds, they further report, the healed tile could support a 300-gram weight. They note that pressing the material for longer amounts of times allows for even stronger bonds to form—eventually, after a couple of hours, the material reaches the same degree of bonding as it had prior to being cut or broken.More work will have to be done with the material before it can be used in a smartphone screen, however, such as making it more transparent. More information: Yu Yanagisawa et al. Mechanically robust, readily repairable polymers via tailored noncovalent cross-linking, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aam7588AbstractExpanding the range of healable materials is an important challenge for sustainable societies. Noncrystalline, high molecular weight polymers generally form mechanically robust materials, which, however, are difficult to repair once they are fractured. This is because their polymer chains are heavily entangled and diffuse too sluggishly to unite fractured surfaces within reasonable timescales. Here, we report that low molecular weight polymers, when cross-linked by dense hydrogen bonds, give mechanically robust yet readily repairable materials, despite their extremely slow diffusion dynamics. A key was to utilize thiourea, which anomalously forms a zigzag hydrogen-bonded array that does not induce unfavorable crystallization. Another key was to incorporate a structural element for activating the exchange of hydrogen-bonded pairs, which enables the fractured portions to rejoin readily upon compression. Engineers around the world have been working hard to find a type of glass or plastic that can be healed easily when broken to address the problem of broken screens on phones and other portable devices. While some progress has been made, there still exists a need for something better. In this new effort, the researchers report on a new type of plastic that can be healed by simply pressing the broken pieces back together.As the researchers describe it, a team member was investigating glue properties with polymers when they discovered that one of the polymers under study could mend itself just by pushing the pieces together. Intrigued, the group looked closer. They found that the hydrogen bonds in the polymer formed in a way that did not crystallize, allowing the molecular chains to move freely. This allowed the bonds to re-form easily under just a small amount of pressure. After working with several configurations, the team settled on a polymer called polyether-thioureas (TUEG3)—it offered the best healing properties of those tested. Citation: A type of semi-transparent polymer that can be mended at room temperature using small pressure (2017, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-12-semi-transparent-polymer-room-temperature-small.html © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more

Suffered acne You may show fewer signs of ageing

first_imgSuffering from those itchy red pimples? Take heart, as your skin may age more slowly than those with no history of acne, a study has found. Signs of ageing such as wrinkles and skin thinning often appear much later in people who have experienced acne in their lifetime. It has been suggested that this is due to increased oil production but there are likely to be other factors involved, the study said. The findings revealed that people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres in their white blood cells, meaning that their cells could be better protected against ageing. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfTelomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found at the end of chromosomes, which protect them from deteriorating during the process of replication.  The telomeres gradually break down and shrink as cells age, eventually leading to cell death, which is a normal part of human growth and ageing. “Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres which appears to be different in acne sufferers and means their cells may be protected against ageing,” said lead author Simone Ribero, a dermatologist at King’s College London.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive“For many years dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime. Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear,” Ribero said.In the study the team measured the length of white blood cell telomeres in 1,205 twins. A quarter of the twins reported having experienced acne in their lifetime.Statistical analyses which adjusted for age, relatedness, weight and height showed that telomere length in acne sufferers was significantly longer, meaning that white blood cells were more protected from the usual deterioration with age. The researchers also examined gene expression in pre-existing skin biopsies from the same twins to identify possible gene pathways linked to acne.last_img read more

Divya Khosla Kumar dazzles on the ramp

first_imgThe gorgeous Divya Khosla Kumar made heads turn as she walked the runway for the Delhi based ace designer Parul J Maurya for her label ‘Ethnique River’ at Vaunt International Fashioner Week, presented by Usha Shriram Mobile Phones in The Umrao Hotel, Delhi. The designer showcased her collection ‘Traveller’ at the fashion week. The collection signified the new era of menswear, drawing an inspiration for modern age man who loves travelling, exploring; who is playful and free-spirited.last_img