Masters moments: Ian Woosnam wins in 1991 and gets a lift from caddie ‘Wobbly’ | Golf News

first_imgWe continue our look back through the Augusta archives by remembering Ian Woosnam’s dramatic victory at The Masters in 1991. As the countdown continues towards the delayed 2020 Masters, we take you back to 1991 at Augusta National and Ian Woosnam’s maiden major triumph.Woosnam arrived for his fourth Masters appearance ranked second in the world behind defending champion Nick Faldo, and with five top-10 finishes to his name in major championships.The Welshman was five off the pace after an opening-round 72, but he responded with an impressive 62 on day two which got him within two strokes of the halfway leader, and home favourite, Tom Watson. 2:25 Woosnam receives the green jacket from Nick Faldo Woosnam receives the green jacket from Nick Faldo

Founders, VCs call for start-ups to innovate, look for opportunities amid COVID-19

first_imgAccording to the Research and Technology Ministry’s National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), only 13 percent of around 1,037 start-ups in Indonesia can scale up their business, while most were reported to be stagnant or dissolved.Ride-hailing start-up giants Gojek and Grab have recently had to retire some of their non-core businesses because of the pandemic’s impact on the companies’ operations.Singapore-based Grab announced in June that it would lay off 360 people, just under 5 percent of its region-wide employees, because of the ongoing crisis. Not long after, Gojek did a headcount cut of 430 workers or around 9 percent of its total workforce, as the company aims to focus on its ride-hailing, food delivery, e-payment and logistics services.Fishery e-commerce start-up Aruna cofounder Utari Octavianty said during the webinar that she pivoted her business in just a week after Indonesia announced rising COVID-19 cases in the country.“Almost all of our products are for exports, but as our logistics were disrupted, we quickly marketed our goods to domestic consumers,” she said. “In times of uncertainty, we can learn to ride the wave.”Aruna recently received US$5.5 million in its latest funding round. The company also reported a 86 percent revenue growth in the first quarter of the year from the same period in 2019.“Start-ups that are negatively affected can look at the room for improvements in their company first. Not every start-up needs to immediately pivot their business,” Amvesindo chairman Jefri Sirait said at the same event.He went on to say that start-ups needed to maintain their liquidity and build runway, which is the calculation on how long a company can survive when income and expenses stay constant.Start-ups need to determine and leverage their competitive advantage at the beginning to become the basis or scalability in the future, according to Jefri.Some venture capital firms (VCs) will consolidate with other VCs to disburse funds amid the pandemic. However, some VCs may hold back their investment plan.“If your start-up has a good product and it needs cash, you can meet with investors, preferably your existing ones, to build up your survival rate,” Jefri said, adding that founders needed to stay prudent but also make quick decisions during this time.Meanwhile, former Jakarta deputy governor and entrepreneur Sandiaga Uno said he saw many start-ups emerge during the pandemic as a sign that Indonesian entrepreneurs could find opportunities in a crisis.He said start-ups could become another kind of “vaccine” as it can provide job opportunities amid a wave of layoffs caused by the pandemic.The government predicts that 2.9 million to 5.2 million workers could lose their jobs during the health crisis as almost all components of economic activities has fallen.“I think we are going to face a new start-up landscape and we won’t experience the pre-COVID situation. Times are changing anyway, and we need to innovate,” he said. “In the current situation, good things come to those who move.”Topics : Adrian advised start-ups in their early stages to focus on building their team and product-market fit, among other measures, while weathering the current situation.Meanwhile, start-ups in the growth stage should focus on scalability and profitability to survive the health crisis and possibly attract new investors.He added that to revive a start-up, founders must also first determine the underlying problem that started the company’s demise in the first place.“If the company is facing a systemic problem, then founders need to rethink their teams, hire new people and build the company up again,” he said. Industry players and venture capitalists have urged start-up founders to innovate and look for opportunities to survive the COVID-19 pandemic.An estimated 15 percent of the country’s start-ups were “severely affected” by the global health crisis between March and May, according to the Venture Capital and Start-Up Indonesia Association (Amvesindo). The figure had gone up to 25 percent by August and is projected to further increase as the pandemic progresses.“In every crisis, start-ups should look for new opportunities or entry points. For existing companies, you can pivot your business to stay resilient,” fintech start-up Investree founder Adrian Gunadi said during a webinar on Thursday.last_img read more

Bale signing leaves Alli’s Spurs future in doubt

first_imgOf the Tottenham Hotspur players impacted by the loan signing of Gareth Bale from Real Madrid, Dele Alli appears the most vulnerable but manager Jose Mourinho has said he will not be sacrificed in the transfer window.Bale will not be ready to resume his Tottenham career until October as he regains fitness, but when he does it is likely to be in an attacking trio with Harry Kane and Son Heung-min.Alli burst into the spotlight at Tottenham in 2015-16 when he was named PFA Young Player of the Year and made his England debut but his form has dipped to such an extent that he has lost his place in Jose Mourinho’s side. With three weeks of the transfer window left, Alli’s name is already being linked with a move to Paris St Germain, but his stock is not what it was when he scored twice for Tottenham in their first ever win against Real Madrid in 2017.”I want a balanced squad, that’s what I want. He doesn’t need to be sacrificed, but the squad is a puzzle,” Mourinho said when asked about Alli’s future on Sunday.Former Tottenham midfielder Michael Brown believes it might be in everyone’s best interests if Alli were to be sold.”It doesn’t look like they’re getting on very well,” Brown told BBC Radio. “I’m hoping he has a reaction and takes the challenge head on, but it doesn’t look good and maybe this one’s broken.”Topics : Left out of Gareth Southgate’s last England squad too, Alli, now aged 24, is at something of a crossroads.His preferred position, playing just behind a front two, looks tailor-made for Bale and Mourinho also has an abundance of attacking options in the form of Lucas Moura, Steven Bergwijn, Giovani Lo Celso and Erik Lamela.Mourinho demands a high work ethic and a recent behind-the-scenes documentary about Tottenham featured one episode in which Mourinho tells Alli he is “lazy” and later, in a one-to-one chat, warns him that he could regret not reaching his potential.Alli was substituted at halftime in Tottenham’s first Premier League game of the new season, a 1-0 loss to Everton, and did not feature at all in last week’s Europa league win at Lokomotiv Plovdiv, nor the 5-2 win at Southampton on Sunday in which Son scored four goals.last_img read more