FCA leans on Harman and Google for new connectedcar services

first_img 2019 Maserati Levante GTS: Heart of gold 2019 Dodge Durango SRT: A big utility with big performance More From Roadshow More about 2019 Dodge Durango SRT AWD Review • 2019 Dodge Durango SRT review: Three-row muscle car Preview • 2019 Dodge Durango: Model overview, pricing, tech and specs 2020 Volvo V60 Cross Country first drive: Small changes make a big impact null 73 Photoscenter_img Tags Share your voice Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Google Auto Tech Future Cars 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid: First hybrid minivan wins on fuel economy 0 In the US, it’s been generally acknowledged that Fiat Chrysler has kept its focus on the older-school elements of the auto industry while others have gone all-in on things like electrification and connectivity. But now, its Uconnect telematics are set to receive a big boost to help adapt to the future of in-car services.Fiat Chrysler announced on Tuesday that it will rely on tech from Harman and Google to build out its connected-car services. This “ecosystem,” as FCA refers to it, is set to launch in the second half of 2019, and it’ll be part of all new FCA vehicles around the world by 2022.Harman’s Ignite cloud platform will serve as the base for the out-of-car side of FCA’s services. With 4G connectivity and tech that fosters “the evolution to 5G,” FCA says its cloud services will work with any service provider worldwide. It’ll cover all the normal stuff that other automakers have in their connected-car portfolios, like fuel and charging station locations, predictive maintenance and over-the-air updates. It should also be capable of working with vehicle-to-infrastructure communication.Enlarge ImageHere’s a quick look at the major things FCA wants its new system to deliver. Yes, it’s a lot. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Google comes into play inside the car. The next version of its Uconnect infotainment system will run on Android, further bridging the connection between phone and in-car telematics. While this might conjure memories of Volvo’s announcement that it will use Android OS in the upcoming Polestar 2, there’s one key difference. Whereas Volvo’s foray with the operating system includes Google Maps, Google Assistant and other apps and services, FCA’s system won’t have any of those ancillary bits, just the operating system.FCA was quick to note that these new foundations will allow for a number of services specific to electrified vehicles, too — an area where, at least in the US, FCA lags behind its competitors. These platforms will enable remote battery management, EV navigation that keeps range in mind and services that help the vehicle work better with the electrical grid.There’s even more than that in store. FCA has its sights set on alternate mobility methods, too — its system is capable of working with usage-based insurance, varying-term vehicle rentals and even peer-to-peer car sharing. The automaker didn’t say which parts would start rolling out first, but as we push into the next decade (just a few months away!), we’ll get a better idea of what FCA has in store.Originally published April 30, 8:08 a.m. PT.Update, 5:32 p.m.: Clarified differences between Volvo and FCA operating systems.last_img read more

The essence of Indian art

first_imgCurating concepts to interpret the idea of India, a battery of designers, artists, artisans, architects and the best of technicians collaborated to deliver what is India’s largest art in public space initiative, The Art Program. Amongst these large installations, two are ready to be shipped off to the Mumbai airport where they will become a part of a collective manifestation of the best our country has to offer. But before that, Delhi gets a special preview of these artworks on the 9 July in Mehrauli, where visitors will have the opportunity to see the art works and interact with the creators over High Tea.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Over the last three years, Rajeev Sethi, an eminent scenographer and chairman of the Asian Heritage foundation spearheaded this programme to represent  21st century India in a manner that leaves visitors with no doubt that they are in India. The first work by Rajeev Sethi, Reappearances below the Tarmac was conceived as a play on the idea of the airport as a virtual metropolis, and the city that disappears and reappears around these 21st century hubs. The cross-runway unique to the Mumbai Airport transforms into a vortex amid an enormous mosaic reminiscent of the city as we fly in. Amid this terracotta skyscape fly mythical airplanes and whimsical flying machines crafted by the potters of Molela, a village near Udaipur, in a significant departure from the customary votive terracotta plaques of gods and goddesses they make. Interspersed between are contemporary studio photographs of young men and women, re-touched up by miniature painters. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix The second, Touché, also by Rajeev Sethi, is inspired by the panchamahabhutas in a symbolic elemental greeting. These coalesce in various permutations and combinations to create the Universe and the five senses by which we perceive them. Air, the second element, born of the agitation created in the vast stillness of space by primordial sound, is expressed as the pavan (wind) and sparsh or the sense of touch. Interpreting Jaipur’s Hawa Mahal or Palace of Winds as a visual metaphor, Touché celebrates the gentle breeze in the arid desert as it wafts through intricate jaalis and the joyous indulgence in this simple sensual pleasure. Referencing the quintessentially tactile quality of textiles, the Hawa Mahal here morphs into an enormous pagdi or turban – insouciantly transforming textile into architecture. Head over to see these two art installations being displayed for the first and the only time in Delhi.last_img read more

3 Lessons From Sony Pictures Cautionary Tale

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. December 29, 2014 It seems like as each day passes, another embarrassment unfolds in the Sony Pictures security breach saga — from unflattering internal discussions to Sony’s ill-advised DDoS counter offensive against the sites leaking their data.But more than just a PR disaster, the headlines spell out a cautionary tale for any business with sensitive data and high-value intellectual property. While the cost of the Sony hack has yet to be assessed, experts predict losses of up to $100 million resulting from the leak of personal financial info, unreleased movies and more.Related: 5 Lessons Leaders Can Learn From the Sony Hacking ScandalThe burning question on any business owner’s mind is: Could Sony have prevented this? Here are three key takeaways from the Sony hack, and what you can do to avoid these mistakes.1. The risk of a data breach is bigger than you think.In terms of probability and losses, the risk of a data breach is huge. If investing in security doesn’t provide a visible enough return to convince your chief financial officer, just look to the statistics: in the past year, 43 percent of companies have experienced a data breach. While the likelihood that you’ll get hacked is high, what makes or breaks your business is its ability to respond.Unfortunately, Jason Spaltro, Sony senior vice president of information security, didn’t get that memo: “It’s a valid business decision to accept the risk. I will not invest $10 million to avoid a possible $1 million loss.” Once he receives the final tally of damages from the Sony hack, he’ll likely revisit that ratio.2. Behave yourself in your emails.One of the biggest embarrassments from the Sony hack has been the leak of several unsavory emails, some of which may cost executive Amy Pascal her job. Racially insensitive comments about the president and declarations that Angelina Jolie is a “spoiled brat” count among her most egregious faux pas. Sony has hired attorney David Boies to try to put the lid on the leaked emails, but now that they’re out in the wild, there are no take-backs.Related: FBI Warns U.S. Businesses of ‘Destructive’ CyberattacksMost of us know better than to let our unscripted thoughts fly in business emails, but most of us also don’t expect our emails to show up on Gawker. If, by chance, you need a reminder to keep it classy, the Sony hack is a powerful example.3. Use email encryption.An email hack can cost you more than your reputation. Consider the sensitive data you send via email, from your business’s financials to important intellectual property. Encryption adds a layer of protection to your data by making it unintelligible to anyone who doesn’t have the decryption key. Even if a hacker manages to steal your data, without the key, they can’t do anything with it. End-to-end email encryption not only helps protect against data leaks, but also keeps your Angelina Jolie disses hush.As the Sony hack continues to prove, with cyber crime, more than money is at stake — besides the PR catastrophe, the threat to some jobs and leaks of unreleased films and other IP, employees and their families have had their medical data exposed and are receiving personal threats.While the loss is staggering, one thing is clear: much of this could have been prevented. By adequately investing in data security and encrypting sensitive files and emails, Sony might have avoided much of the fallout from this data breach.You never know where something you send could show up. Once you hit send, it’s out of your control, right? Wrong. There are new technologies available that give email users back control over how their messages are viewed and shared online. These tools (such as Virtru) provide email users with easy to install, and use, end-to-end encryption and unique privacy controls such as the ability to revoke a message after it’s been sent, restrict forwarding and set expiry for sensitive emails to auto-delete.The hard truth is that sending an email is like sending a postcard — the message is there for virtually anyone to see and use. If you’re an email user who has mistakenly sent an email to the wrong person or wants to ensure your private information remains private and confidential, an extra layer of protection is needed. Just ask Sony.Related: Make Hacking Harder (Infographic) Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more