Swoop adds 7th aircraft ahead of summer 2019 schedule

first_img Posted by Travelweek Group Share CALGARY — Low cost carrier Swoop has released its summer 2019 schedule in full with new destinations, domestic markets, two new transborder markets and an extension of two international routes.Swoop says it’s adding London ON, Kelowna B.C. and Oakland CA. The new domestic markets include service between London, ON and Halifax six times per week and daily service from London, ON to/from Abbotsford and Edmonton. Service between Kelowna and Winnipeg will be offered three times a week. The schedule also sees the return of the seasonal route between Abbotsford and Winnipeg four times per week.Edmonton will get increased transborder capacity with three times weekly flights to/from Oakland, CA and a weekly flight to/from Orlando.Swoop will also continue its Hamilton service to Montego Bay and Cancun, with a weekly return flight throughout the summer.Among the routes that will end for the summer are Hamilton to Puerto Vallarta and Tampa Bay, and Abbotsford to Puerto Vallarta and Mazatlán. Edmonton to Mesa will take a short hiatus and suspend service at the end of May, before resuming Oct. 5, 2019.“The summer 2019 schedule focuses on realizing economies of scale,” said Steven Greenway, President of Swoop.  “We have created a schedule that leverages our existing network while expanding to a limited number of strategic destinations.”All of the nonstop flights are available for travel from April 28 through Oct. 26. Tuesday, January 22, 2019 center_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: 2019, Schedule, Summer, Swoop Swoop adds 7th aircraft ahead of summer 2019 schedulelast_img read more

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first_img 35 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Top Stories The Heisman Trophy winner has some skeptics in the NFL due to his size and build.ESPN’s Todd McShay, in the 2.0 version of his mock draft before Murray’s announcement, had the Oklahoma product going 13th overall to the Miami Dolphins. Murray was the second quarterback off the board following Ohio State signal-caller Dwayne Haskins; McShay has Haskins going No. 6 to the New York Giants.It is worth noting, though, that the six writers were asked if they would select Murray in the top-10 and they all said yes. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and sellingcenter_img The connection, though, goes beyond that according to two NFL writers.ESPN.com asked a handful of their NFL writers some questions regarding Murray and both Matt Bowen and Mike Sando believe the perfect fit for Murray is in Arizona.Bowen loves the stylistic match.New coach Kliff Kingsbury can build his system around Josh Rosen. But if we are talking about a perfect fit, where Kingsbury can also utilize the creativity of his QB-designed runs/run-pass options to mesh with his traditional spread/Air Raid pass concepts? Then it’s Murray running the show. And that would cost the No. 1 overall pick.Sando goes back to Kingsbury’s love of Murray as a quarterback.Because Kingsbury has expressed such an affinity for him. Murray would also bring excitement to an organization that needs a spark.Arizona, of course, just traded up in the 2018 NFL Draft to select former UCLA quarterback Josh Rosen. In his rookie season, Rosen threw for 2,278 yards, 11 touchdowns and 14 interceptions.Related LinksOklahoma QB Kyler Murray chooses NFL path over MLBCardinals’ Kliff Kingsbury talks about Murray comments, leaving USCESPN’s Schefter suggests Cardinals could draft QB Murray, trade RosenArizona Hotshots score 1st touchdown and win in franchise historyThe 5-foot-10 Murray was the ninth overall pick in the 2018 MLB Draft. He initially planned on a baseball career, but a potential football career called after he threw for 42 touchdowns to seven interceptions as a junior this season at Oklahoma. FILE – In this Sept. 22, 2018, file photo, Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray (1) throws in the first half of an NCAA college football game against Army, in Norman, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File) Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray made his intentions official Monday, choosing the NFL over MLB.The Arizona Cardinals have been linked to Murray in the past, due to new head coach Kliff Kingsbury’s comments from October — when he was still at Texas Tech — on taking Murray No. 1 overall if he had the chance. So with Kingsbury getting the job in Arizona, the team with the No. 1 overall selection, the clip went viral.last_img read more

Rep Webber honors regional youth soccer champions

first_img18Oct Rep. Webber honors regional youth soccer champions Categories: Webber News State Rep. Michael Webber today welcomed the Nationals Union 02 Girls Black soccer team to the Capitol. The team, coached by Jeremy Harkins, won the U.S. Youth Soccer Midwest Regional Championship this summer.Rep. Webber and Gov. Rick Snyder honored them with a tribute from the Michigan House of Representatives.“I’m very excited to host this remarkable group of young athletes today,” Rep. Webber said. “The Nationals Union 02 Black team has had an outstanding season under the leadership of Coach Harkins. I’m certain this team will continue to work hard and achieve great things.”All National Union 02 Black soccer team players reside in the southeast region of Michigan, including the Greater Rochester Area. The U.S. Youth Soccer National Championship series is a prestigious national youth soccer tournament, providing approximately 185,000 players on over 10,000 teams the opportunity to showcase their athletic skills.PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Michael Webber today welcomed the Nationals Union 02 Girls Black soccer team with Gov. Snyder. They were joined by head coach Jeremy Harkins in the Michigan House of Representatives.last_img read more

Movie streaming service Voddlers adsupported tit

first_imgMovie streaming service Voddler’s ad-supported titles can now be downloaded and watched an unlimited number of times within a 30 day period.Voddler, which is available in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Spain, made its rental service available off-line in December. Free movies can now also be watched offline by premium Voddler Plus members. Users must first download the Voddler Player app to their computers. Voddler said it was hoping to expand the service to other devices, and added that most content owners, including all the Hollywood studios with which it has deals, have made their content available for downloading.“Our goal has always been to offer all titles for offline viewing, regardless of which revenue model they use. Today we reach that goal,” said Anders Sjöman, vice-president communication at Voddler.Voddler Premium members can download an unlimited number of Voddler movies. Rental movies can be watched an unlimited number of times within a 48-hour period, while ad-supported movies can be watched within a 30 day window.last_img read more

The Internet is full of stories about politicians

first_imgThe Internet is full of stories about politicians acting badly and doing the opposite of what they promised. Talk radio is full of the same things, all day, every day. Even around office water coolers, almost everyone will admit that politicians are liars and thieves. Given all of this, it’s rather bizarre that people still believe and obey the bums. If we knew such things about a neighbor, would we continue to take them seriously? Yet, for some reason, politicians get a permanent pass on anything stupid they do. The first reason for this is simply that most people have been bamboozled. They were taught that government is necessary and that without it, we’d all be ignorant savages, eating whatever few berries and roots we could scrounge… that without government nothing would be built, nothing invented, and nothing taught. That’s all propaganda, of course, paid for by the people it praises. But, it’s what we were all taught and it’s hard for people to let it go, no matter how stupid it is. The second reason is that people are afraid. We all know why. None of that, however, is what I want to cover today. Instead, I want to look at the subtle reasons why people can’t let go of “politics.” These reasons are very powerful, but they lie beneath the surface and are harder to identify than self-serving, government-funded BS. Reason #1: I Can Blame Anyone but Me Somehow, people all across the West have become pathologically afraid of blame. It probably began as a corrosive fear of hell: If I’m to blame for anything, I’ll go to hell, and that must be avoided. But be that as it may, this fear of blame allows political parties to provide a highly desirable service: They help you assign all blame to others. If you like the Red party, you can always affix blame to the Blues and not to yourself. If you’re in the Blue party, you can lay all blame onto the Reds. It’s actually an elegant scam. The Blue v. Red show lets everyone avoid taking any blame onto themselves, while the big machine keeps right on running. This fear of blame is ridiculous, of course: We’ve all made mistakes. What matters is correcting them and not repeating them. But if we pretend we never make mistakes, nothing gets fixed and the problems continue. This neurotic avoidance of blame puts politicians in wonderful position – they don’t actually have to solve anything, and any blame is deflected to their evil opposition. Reason #2: It Makes Me Feel Brave at No Expense Politics lets us pretend that we’re fixing problems at no expense, save talking. Actually doing something is not required. Politics empowers our mere words to generate powerful results. At least that’s what people want to believe. It’s the easy way out. You never have to get up and act. You never have to take a real risk. No blood, no sweat, no tears. This is just another scam, of course: The politicians continue do what they want, and the people keep right on believing, even though their words seldom generate any real results. All they need to do is keep you in the game. So long as you keep hoping that your words will affect the future, they can do whatever they please. The alternative would be taking responsibility onto yourself and acting on your own. Gain would require pain… precisely the thing that people want to avoid. So, instead, they keep believing that politics will magically turn complaints into results, and they remain tied into the system, no matter how badly it fails them. Reason #3: It Makes Me Feel Noble at No Expense Politics lets you pour charity onto the targets of your choice, without any personal expense. The magical money pot in the capital city dispenses it, and you feel no pain. It doesn’t matter what your target of choice is, by the way. For some, it’s “the less fortunate,” to others, it’s people on another continent. It really doesn’t matter, aside from the fact that it makes you feel good to help people and that you never have to put your hand into your own pocket. Again, this is clearly a scam: The money comes from ourselves (in ways we don’t think about), from others (those super-rich people), or, primarily these days, from generations yet unborn in the form of state debt. But, those are things that can be ignored, and politicians are always quick to help us ignore them. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

first_img— – Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry DirectorSean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Get Ready:This Wednesday at 8 pm, Porter Stansberry, founder of Stansberry Research, will host an exclusive live webinar called: “How to Profit from the Greatest Transfer of Wealth in History.” You won’t want to miss this… click here to reserve your seat. Critical Warning to Anyone Who Was Born Before 1969We just got exclusive information obtained from an “invitation-only” meeting in Washington, D.C. Some of the most powerful people in finance gathered behind closed doors to discuss a secret deal… one that could have a major impact on your finances, especially if you were born before 1969. If you’re a senior and rely on the government for income, you’ll be badly hurt if this deal gets inked. Click here to see the details. – Recommended Links Doug: Scandinavia is on a slippery slope. I wouldn’t be surprised if a very nasty “black swan” the size of a pterodactyl landed there. The U.S. isn’t far behind. Big Brother is coming out of the cellar, where he’s been chained up, in the U.S. And I’m afraid he’s so strong and nasty that few people will be able to pay him enough to leave them alone.There have long been local pockets of notorious corruption in the U.S., of course; building inspectors, people like that. On a national level, the DEA became very corrupt early on, a natural consequence of “regulating” an industry that runs on billions in cash.Other federal agencies are more subtly corrupt. Generals are paid off by being hired by defense contractors after they’re mustered out. FDA types are hired by the drug companies and large agribusinesses, and executives from those companies become high-level bureaucrats in the FDA. Politicians rarely take envelopes of cash anymore. They wait until they are out of office to collect millions in directors’ fees, book deals, speaking tours, stock deals, and the like. Bill Clinton is a perfect example of someone who went from near penniless to a net worth of $50 million-plus overnight. The Clintons have made a huge leap from the days when Hillary had to take a $100,000 payoff in the guise of her totally transparent cattle-trading scheme.The problem now, though, is that there are giant police bureaucracies like the TSA and the FBI that have no direct way of getting paid off. So they enforce the idiotic laws like robots. Other bureaucracies like NSA do their damage remotely, too far from the victim to be negotiated with. This is a real source of danger.Doug Casey is a multi-millionaire speculator and the founder of Casey Research. He literally wrote the book on profiting during economic turmoil. Doug’s book, Crisis Investing, spent multiple weeks as number one on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the best-selling financial book of 1980. Doug has been a regular guest on national television, including spots on CNN, Merv Griffin, Charlie Rose, Regis Philbin, Phil Donahue, and NBC News.Doug and his team of analysts write The Casey Report, one of the world’s most respected investment advisories. Each month, The Casey Report provides specific, actionable ideas to help subscribers make money in stocks, bonds, currencies, real estate, and commodities. You can try out The Casey Report risk-free by clicking here. L: It’s interesting: These countries where a high degree of legal regulation seems to work are also highly homogeneous and have very powerful cultures; makes you wonder if the laws are really doing anything at all, or if they are just window dressing on more powerful social systems.It makes me think of the many experimental societies tried out in the 19th century in the U.S., when there were still open frontiers to which one could escape with like-minded people and try to do things differently. Most were communes. And most were disasters. Some worked, and a few even still exist in vestigial form today, like the Amana colonies. Those that worked best were religious communes. Just goes to show that if you can go beyond homogeneity and get unanimity, you can create a society that seems to defy all experience to the contrary. When everyone buys in, amazing things can happen…at least for a while.Doug: Almost anything can work for a while. Some monasteries approach an almost perfect state of communism. It’s possible because everyone there chooses to be there and live according to those rules. Unanimous consent. But that’s not possible in an entire country, and even the super-majority buy-in of highly homogeneous cultures like New Zealand and Scandinavia is not possible in 98% of the rest of the countries in the world. If you look at the rest of the world, the more socialistic and regulated the country, the more corrupt it tends to be. And the larger the country, the more disparate the population and divergent the mores, the less effective the government’s regulation.L: That would cover China, Russia…Brazil, Mexico.Doug: And Argentina, where I am now. The customs inspectors down here, for example, all expect to retire as multimillionaires. That’s because they have so many laws on what you can export or import…how, when, and why, it’s almost impossible to comply with, or even know, all the laws. It’s much cheaper and easier to get the inspector to look the other way with a well-placed envelope.There’s good news and bad news in this.In itself, corruption is a bad thing; it shouldn’t have to be necessary. As I touched on earlier, insofar as it’s necessary, it’s also a good thing. If we can’t eliminate the laws that give rise to corruption, it’s a good thing that it’s possible to circumvent these laws. The worst of all situations is to have a mass of strict, stultifying, economically suicidal laws…and also have strict, effective enforcement of those laws. If a culture doesn’t allow people to work around stupid laws, that culture’s doom is further sealed with every stupid law passed, which is pretty much all of them.L: Strict laws, strictly enforced, is a recipe for paralysis. I’ve often said that while Mexico is much less free than the U.S. on paper, it is much more free in fact. People in the U.S. fear their government, especially the IRS. In Mexico, people build what they want, eat what they want, sell what they want; tax evasion is the national pastime.Doug: Right. This is one of the reasons why, though I’ve lived in New Zealand quite a bit over the last 10 years, I’m not really interested in hanging my spurs there any longer. Although it’s gotten vastly better since the reforms of the mid-’80s, it’s still a dull, insular place with a lot of ingrained socialist attitudes, but not much corruption to help you obviate them. And I wouldn’t want to live in the Scandinavian countries either.They have all these incredibly stupid laws that sheep-like residents obey, enabling great tyranny, but it goes unrecognized because it has such popular support. It suits me much better to live in a place like Argentina, where there’s an equal number of stupid laws, but nobody pays any attention to them. And when there is a problem, it can most often be handled, informally.L: I won’t ask you on the record if you’ve ever actually done that. Interesting comment about Scandinavia: I was just reading Google News yesterday, and one of the top video news stories was a clip about some poor woman in Sweden who’s had her twin daughters taken away by the child protection busybodies. The children were taken, without notice, from their school, and the woman didn’t even know it was an official abduction until she got a letter a week later. The real horror of it is that there isn’t actually any evidence of wrongdoing on the woman’s part. The law is preemptive and protective; the bureaucrats are authorized to remove children from their families if there might be danger to them. No due process, and forget about “innocent until proven guilty.” The breathtaking assumption is that it’s better to rip children out of their families than to find out if there’s a real problem first. This could only hold sway in a place where the culture is one of great confidence in the wisdom and benevolence of the state. “They’ll do everything they can to push the price of gold down.”This statement was made by keynote speaker and trend forecaster Gerald Celente at the 2015 Casey Research Summit. Find out what Mr. Celente has to say about gold manipulation…the Federal Reserve’s hidden scheme…and how you can protect yourself from it right here. (Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)This interview was first published on February 9, 2011Editor’s Note: In yesterday’s Weekend Edition, Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why laws and regulations can’t stop corruption. Today, Doug explains why corruption in government can actually be a good thing….Louis James: I think the point of government-sponsored irresponsibility is particularly important, and often overlooked.I’ve long thought that it was FDR’s New Deal that really pushed America over the edge, not so much because of the economic cost, but because it made it very clear to people that they did not need to be responsible for themselves. Big Brother now takes care of them when they get old, or should they fall ill, or lose a job; no need to plan ahead or save… It’s no wonder our culture has transformed from one of individualism and self-reliance to one of groupthink and reliance on the state, populated by entitlement-minded couch potatoes.But what do you say to people who point to places like Sweden, a highly government-regulated society that seems to work? Such a nice, clean place, with lots of government.Doug: It’s a good point. Sweden is at the low end of the corruption scale, but it’s not because they have laws against corruption; everybody has those. It’s because of the culture; the peer pressure, moral opprobrium, and social approbation I mentioned earlier. Sweden is a small country where word of misdeeds spreads quickly. It has a highly homogeneous culture based on deep-rooted traditions, and there’s a high degree of consensus about how things should be. That makes Swedes cooperate with the large body of law that reflects that consensus, much more than would happen almost anywhere else, or is even possible anywhere else.Out of a couple hundred countries in the world outside of Scandinavia, I can think of two other places that have a similarly powerful culture that makes a “big-government” approach to managing society seem to work: New Zealand and Uruguay. These places are small, relatively isolated, homogeneous, and with powerful cultural traditions that have, unfortunately, been codified into law. These countries, coincidentally, also have the three oldest socialist governments in the world, all dating back to the turn of the 20th century. Trying to bribe officials in these places, even Uruguay, is pretty much out of the question.But these places are anomalous. Because of their rare characteristics, they can’t be held up as role models for other places. Almost everywhere else, where there’s more diversity of ethnicity, culture, much larger population, and so forth, Scandinavian socialism wouldn’t even have the appearance of working. And, I’d argue, it won’t work much longer in Scandinavia either; Sweden and these other places will ultimately collapse under the weight of their mass of laws and socialist intervention in their economies. Recommended Links —last_img read more

A group of disabled activists – led by a crossbenc

first_imgA group of disabled activists – led by a crossbench peer – are to intervene in a legal case for the first time next week, in a bid to persuade three high court judges not to weaken the law to allow assisted suicide.Not Dead Yet UK (NDY UK), a campaign group of disabled people opposed to a change in the law on assisted suicide, has been granted the right to intervene in the high-profile judicial review being taken by Noel Conway, who is terminally-ill.Conway is taking a case against the Ministry of Justice, and wants the court to find that the Suicide Act – which makes it illegal to assist someone to take their own life – is incompatible with articles eight (on the right to a private and family life) and 14 (which prohibits discrimination) of the European Convention on Human Rights.NDY UK, led by its founder, the disabled peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell, had just 10 days to put together its legal submission to the high court, after being granted permission to intervene in the case, but even then was only allowed to submit 20 pages of legal arguments.It is now hoping the three high court judges hearing the case will also allow NDY UK to submit a witness statement from Baroness Campbell herself, and permit NDY UK’s barrister, Catherine Casserley, of Cloisters chambers, to respond to the arguments of Conway’s legal team in court.If NDY UK wins the right to be heard orally in court, it could even risk bankruptcy if Conway wins his case and the judges make an order that the campaign group should pay some of his lawyers’ costs.Baroness Campbell and her members were only able to secure their status as interveners in the case because their two lawyers, Casserley and solicitor Chris Fry, of Fry Law, offered to work pro bono.Although they are on the same side as the Ministry of Justice, which is also fighting a change in the law, they are facing a well-funded team from solicitors Irwin Mitchell, backed by the substantial financial resources of the campaign group Dignity in Dying, formerly known as the Voluntary Euthanasia Society.Baroness Campbell told Disability News Service: “This is David and Goliath.“It always tends to be those organisations not run and controlled by disabled people that get the cash. That does stick in the throat a bit.“Whether you agree with assisted suicide, you should have a balanced opportunity to hear both views and I fear the [judges are] in jeopardy of not hearing all the views which [they need] to hear in order to make a good judgement.”It is the first time NDY UK has intervened in a legal case on assisted suicide in the 12 years since it was founded by Baroness Campbell.Their case has relied on disabled activists from NDY UK, the pro bono work of Fry and Casserley, and support from its sister organisation in the USA, Not Dead Yet, and its president and founder, Diane Coleman, as well as law students from both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University.Conway argues that the current law prevents him exercising his right to choice and control over his death.He said earlier this year: “I know I am going to die anyway, but how and when should be up to me.“To have the option of an assisted death in this country would provide me with great reassurance and comfort.“It would allow me to decide when I am ready to go, rather than be forced into a premature death by travelling abroad or be left at the mercy of a cruel illness.”But Baroness Campbell, who plans to attend court for the first day of the judicial review on Monday (17 July), said the prospect of a change in the law was “terrifying”, which was why she and fellow activists had decided that NDY UK must intervene in the court case.In the witness statement – which may not be accepted by the court – Baroness Campbell says that any ruling in favour of Conway would “impact negatively on the lives of other terminally ill and disabled people”.She says it would “damage beyond repair the way in which society views the elderly, sick and disabled to the point where the Equality Act itself and the protection which it provides becomes fundamentally defective”.She adds: “I (and the hundreds of disabled and terminally ill members of NDY UK), want people to understand that it is perfectly possible to have a fulfilling and enjoyable life whilst living with a substantial, progressive condition.”She hopes to tell the court that continuing cuts to health and care services would mean that disabled and terminally-ill people “may become more inclined towards considering desperate options such as assisted suicide”, if it was legalised.The writer and activist Penny Pepper, another NDY UK member, who is quoted in Baroness Campbell’s witness statement, says: “The massive publicity machine working for those who promote assisted suicide drowns out the ‘small voices’ of disabled people who want support to live, not die.”Another member, Felicity Wright, warns that legalisation would destroy the doctor-patient relationship, and that doctors are “amongst the very last people I would trust to have a balanced opinion about the quality of my life”.Baroness Campbell, whose own impairment, spinal muscular atrophy, leaves her in a similar physical situation to Conway, who has motor neurone disease, says she identifies with and understands his fears of the possible death he might face due to an eventual “physical shutdown”.But she says that “parliament has concluded that legalisation would be ‘a dangerous and inappropriate way to tackle end of life fears’”*.She adds: “In every country where assisted suicide has been made legal, original safeguards have been watered down, allowing the parameters to widen and include people that were outside of the original legislation.“There is no reason that this would not happen in the UK, and frankly I predict it will.”Fry, who worked with fellow discrimination law expert Casserley on another high-profile disability rights case, which saw their client Doug Paulley win a ground-breaking legal victory that protected the rights of wheelchair-users to travel on buses, said he felt an “overwhelming sense of responsibility” about the case.He said he had been involved in other high-profile cases which have changed the law – including Paulley’s – but “this is the one that carries for me the greatest sense of personal responsibility because ultimately the issues being decided in this case will affect almost everybody in today’s society”.He said a change in the law would have a “multi-layered impact across the whole of society” and would undermine the Equality Act, which is “founded on the concept that we should do more to empower people and to give an effective right to life and a right to an engaged, fulfilling and accessible and inclusive life.“If you suddenly start saying it’s about the right to die and start unravelling it all, you’re unravelling a quarter of a century of positive equality legislation and case law.“This, for me, is probably the biggest case I will be involved in in my career, because of the significant responsibility that comes with trying to ensure the voices of disabled people are heard as part of this judicial process.”He said there was a “serious threat” that Conway could win, as Dignity in Dying and its lawyers had spent a “significant amount of time and money” in preparing their case since the last attempts to change the law, on behalf of Tony Nicklinson and two other disabled men, ended in failure at the Supreme Court three years ago.Fry said: “This poses a real threat that the law will be changed. If we lose this case and subsequently it gets as far as the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court decides that assisted dying should be legal, that’s it.”In her legal submission to the court on behalf of NDY UK, Casserley warns that the court is being asked to create “a climate in which a disabled person is seen as a burden and the option of a course which involves termination of life becomes routine”.She asks the court to consider not only Conway’s rights, but those of the other disabled and terminally ill people “who will be potentially affected adversely by the Court’s decision and the message that this conveys to them”.She adds: “NDYUK has significant concerns that if society indicates that as a disabled or terminally ill person assisted dying is an option open to them there is a risk of application of internal pressure derived from a value system which views disability negatively.”*Nearly two years ago, the latest attempt to change the law in parliament was heavily defeated, with MPs voting 330 to 118 against a private members’ bill put forward by Labour MP Rob Marris that would have legalised assisted suicide for people said to have up to six months to live.last_img read more

New Climate Change exhibit draws on latest scientific information about impact of

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 1 2019The Harvard Museum of Natural History announces the new Climate Change exhibit that draws on the latest scientific information about our warming climate, the global and local consequences, and how to both reduce the fossil fuel emissions that cause it and prepare for its effects.This multimedia exhibit includes engaging video and storm simulations, a “check your knowledge” interactive station, and a dramatic inside look at a high-tech Argo float from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution-one of more than 4,000 deployed worldwide to monitor global oceans and climate.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchDeveloped in collaboration with the Harvard University Center for the Environment and informed by new Harvard research, the exhibit offers visitors the hard facts¬¬–the knowns and unknowns–about one of the greatest challenges the world faces.”Climate change is one of the most complicated and challenging problems the world has ever faced” said Professor Dan Schrag, Director of the Harvard Center for the Environment and lead curator of the exhibit. “It is a global problem, and one that requires global action to manage the impacts and minimize the risks. Here at Harvard, we have many researchers who contribute to understanding climate change and working towards solutions. This exhibit is a manifestation of that knowledge, and through our partnership with HMNH, we are able to present some of that to the broader community.” For more perspectives on climate change across economics, public policy, the arts, and more see the videos at https://climatechange.environment.harvard.edu/home#section2.Harvard Museums of Science & Culture Executive Director Jane Pickering said the museums aim to provide a meeting point for scholars and the public. “The Harvard Museum of Natural History has had an exhibit on climate change since 2004,” said Pickering, “but we felt it was imperative at this time to rethink our display. We wanted to connect visitors to the cutting-edge research going on at the university as they consider their own responses to this unprecedented global challenge.” Source:https://hmnh.harvard.edu/climate-change-prlast_img read more

Veterans more likely to have heart disease at a younger age finds

first_img Source:https://www.ucf.edu/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 15 2019After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.These results are published in a new University of Central Florida study appearing in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.”I think it’s sort of the first indications of a coming public health crisis for veterans,” says Ramon Hinojosa, an assistant professor in UCF’s Department of Sociology and the study’s author. “Because of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, we have a relatively large, new, younger generation of veterans who are going to survive for 30 or 40 years after their war experience.”The study indicates that perhaps the “healthy-soldier effect” is no longer guaranteed. The effect refers to the tendency for active-duty service members to be more physically fit and less overweight than same-age, nonmilitary individuals. It’s a phenomenon that Hinojosa explores in ongoing research.”The outcome of the analysis suggested that not only does the healthy-soldier effect not seem as potent as it once was, in fact, what I see is veterans tend to have cardiovascular morbidity earlier than nonveterans, and they tend to have a greater number of conditions,” Hinojosa says.The researcher said the change could be due to the nature of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan, modern warfare, changing diets, changing approaches to leisure and exercise, higher rates of obesity in younger veterans than nonveterans at the same age, and higher rates of drinking, smoking and mental illness.In light of these results, Hinojosa said it is important for health practitioners to look closely at cardiovascular health for younger veterans so they can address preventative approaches to ward off early onset of cardiovascular diseases.Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart disease”I think that being aware we sort of have the first rumblings of what seems to be a health crisis will help us focus our attention on health resources and providing younger veterans with access to resources that can help them ameliorate the likelihood of early onset cardiovascular disease,” Hinojosa says.The study used data from the National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative health survey of individuals in the United States that’s conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.Hinojosa looked at five particular cardiovascular conditions reported in the survey and their association with veteran status and sociodemographic status, including age.Responses from 153,556 individuals were used, and the study looked at pooled survey data from 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, the most recent available data at the time.From age 35 to about age 70, veterans reported significantly more cardiovascular conditions than nonveterans. After age 70, nonveterans reported more cardiovascular conditions than veterans.The switch could be due to fewer veterans surviving into older age because of cardiovascular diseases, Hinojosa said.”It’s concerning to know that the physical benefits of military service seem to be not holding as well for the younger veterans,” Hinojosa says. “This suggests the health protective benefits of military service are not what they used to be. I think that should cause us to really look at what’s going on among the veterans after they leave military service.”last_img read more

Siddaramaiah exudes confidence of winning trust vote says its a joint decision

first_img Next Siddaramaiah exudes confidence of winning trust vote, says it’s a joint decisionSenior Congress leader Siddaramaiah on Friday said the decision to seek a trust vote by the coalition government headed by Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy was taken by the two ruling partners and asserted it has the numbers.advertisement Press Trust of India BengaluruJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 20:00 IST Replying to questions, Siddaramaiah said without numbers or confidence none will seek a trust vote. (Photo: PTI)Senior Congress leader Siddaramaiah on Friday said the decision to seek a trust vote by the coalition government headed by Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy was taken by the two ruling partners and asserted it has the numbers.The Congress Legislature Party Leader also said he had been talking to disgruntled party MLAs barring Roshan Baig because he has been suspended.”Yesterday, we took the decision (on the trust vote) after discussions,” the former chief minister told reporters.Kumaraswamy, whose government is teetering on the brink of collapse after 16 MLAs of the ruling combine resigned, made the announcement about trust vote in the assembly earlier on Friday.Replying to questions, Siddaramaiah said without numbers or confidence none will seek a trust vote.”We have confidence, so we are moving the confidence motion,” he added.On how the ruling combine would muster the numbers, Siddaramaiah said, How can we disclose now? You will come to know when the vote of confidence is moved. Things like how it will happen, who will be present cannot be disclosed now.”To a question, he ruled out the possibility of a counter-operation to the alleged toppling bid of BJP, saying his party did not belive in operations.He refused to comment on the Supreme Court ordering status quo in the matter of resignation and disqualification of ten rebel MLAs.However, he added the Speaker was empowered under the anti-defection law to decide on disqualification of MLAs.Also Read | Karnataka crisis: Will face all issues on floor of House, says CM KumaraswamyAlso Read | Karnataka crisis: No decision on rebel MLAs till July 16, SC tells SpeakerAlso Watch | Kumaraswamy seeks floor test, says he govt has numbersFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byShifa Naseer Tags :Follow KumaraswamyFollow Karnataka crisisFollow Siddaramaiahlast_img read more