Ateneo bags sixth win, hands NU third straight loss

first_imgFor the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. PVL: Arellano secures semis spot, drops UP in thriller Read Next BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president “NU’s a tough team, we knew that coming in,” said Arespacochaga. “We played their pace, which was an up and down game. Good thing in the fourth quarter we played better defense.”And that defense was focused on NU’s J-Jay Alejandro who had 21 points coming into the fourth but was limited to just three in the final period.Ikeh tied his career-high of 18 points, to go along 11 rebounds, while Vince Tolentino also finished with his own career-high of 15 points.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAteneo remained perfect in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament after turning back National University, 96-83, Saturday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The Blue Eagles scored their season-high and retained their spot atop the eight-team ladder with a 6-0 record while the Bulldogs slipped to their third straight loss and fell to a 2-4 card.ADVERTISEMENT Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City NU trailed 85-73 late in the fourth but the Bulldogs tried to build momentum with five unanswered points to cut the deficit to seven, 85-78, on an Issa Gaye throwdown in transition with 2:46 to play.Thirdy Ravena, however, quelled any hopes of a comeback with a booming triple that gave Ateneo a 10-point lead, 88-78, with 2:20 remaining in the game.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutChibueze Ikeh effectively put the game away as he rolled to the basket for the open layup to push the lead to 14 with under a minute to play.Ateneo assistant coach Sandy Arespacochaga knew they had to avoid playing NU’s pace after allowing the Bulldogs to partially dictate the tempo in the first three quarters. LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Carroll’s 24 points lead Nets over struggling Grizzlies

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA While the Grizzlies were grousing, the Nets were celebrating, at least for one night, after snapping a three-game losing streak.DeMarre Carroll scored a season-high 24 points and Trevor Booker added 16 points and 11 rebounds. Joe Harris finished with 13 points for the Nets, who used a third-quarter spurt to put away the Grizzlies.The teams were tied at 47 at the break, but the Nets opened the second half with a 22-6 run, looking much more fluid on offense than in the opening half. Brooklyn connected on nine of its first 15 shots to build the lead, outscoring the Grizzlies 32-18.“We came out in the second half and got two big stops, scored,” Brooklyn coach Kenny Atkinson said. “We picked up our energy in the second half. The first part of the third quarter, that’s where I thought the game turned.”Memphis was able to get back in the game to open the final period, composing a 12-3 run. Memphis got the deficit to five points, but the Brooklyn lead was too much to overcome.ADVERTISEMENT Brooklyn Nets forward Trevor Booker (35) reacts after dunking the ball in the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The misery remains for the Memphis Grizzlies, and friction seems to be building in the locker room.Memphis dropped its eighth straight on Sunday in a 98-88 loss to the Brooklyn Nets. The Grizzlies made a fourth-quarter dent in a Nets lead that stretched to 19, all while center Marc Gasol was in a warmup on the bench. Despite matching Tyreke Evans for the team lead with 18 points, Gasol, who leads the team in scoring, rebounds and assists, wasn’t called on to play in the final period.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. And he wasn’t pleased.“I do not know the why,” Gasol said of not playing down the stretch, later adding: “It’s a first for me, trust me, and I don’t like it one bit. I’m more (ticked) than I can show and frustrated.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSpeaking before Gasol, Memphis coach David Fizdale said his decision was based on the reserves playing well and cutting into the Brooklyn lead. He said not much has worked for the team during the skid, particularly Sunday, when the Grizzlies gave up the lead in a poor third quarter.Asked about Gasol’s reaction about not playing down the stretch, Fizdale said: “We’ll address it if it needs to be addressed, but it was a pretty simple decision what I did. It’s nothing against him. I’m trying to win a game. I’m desperate.” Gilas size key vs Taipei Grizzlies: Visit San Antonio on Wednesday. QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMCcenter_img Chief Justice Peralta vows to lead by example, bares 10-point program PLAY LIST 02:02Chief Justice Peralta vows to lead by example, bares 10-point program00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion MOST READ “We wanted to get out in transition and make them run,” Harris said, “and I thought we did better at that in the second half.”TIP-INSNets: Harris started in Allen Crabbe’s place. … Carroll’s previous season high was 18 on Oct. 25 against Cleveland. … The Nets shot 45 percent from the field, breaking a string of surpassing 50 percent the last two games and three of the previous four. … The Nets had 19 assists, breaking a streak of at least 24 assists in their last five.Grizzlies: Memphis had not lost eight straight since a similar skid from Feb. 11-March 3, 2009. … The team announced that Chandler Parsons tweaked his knee and did not return in the second half. The team characterized it as a precautionary move.MORE INJURY TROUBLESThe Nets, who already were without D’Angelo Russell and Jeremy Lin with long-term injuries, had more setbacks. Crabbe, who was going to start, was a late scratch with a sore lower back. Then in the second quarter, Rondae Hollis-Jefferson went down with a right ankle sprain. “It’s unfortunate that we have so many injuries right now, but that’s why we have 15 guys on the team,” Booker said.MORE MARC MUSINGSGasol spent a lot of time answering questions about the fourth-quarter situation in the Grizzlies locker room. Even after the team’s public relations staff asked if everyone was finished, Gasol said he was willing to keep talking, expressing his displeasure about the situation. “I’m just as competitive as anybody,” he said. “I hate not playing. That’s what I value the most. If I’m not on the floor, I’m not valued. I’m sure (the coaching staff) knew that would hurt me the most.”UP NEXTNets: Visit Houston on Monday. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Read Next Cayetano: 4 social media groups behind SEA Games ‘sabotage’ View commentslast_img read more

SPORTSCOVER SPONSORSHIP FUND GRANTS AVAILABLE

first_imgSports Cover Australia in Association with SBS is poised to allocate the second round of 2006 Sportscover Sponsorship Fund (SSF) grants to amateur sporting clubs nation wide. Applications for the ten remaining $1000 grant close on Friday 24 November 2006. Between August and December 2006, The SSF will have awarded 20 x $1,000 grants to amateur sporting clubs and associations throughout Australia. Southern Districts Touch Football Association in Western Australia were successful in their Grant application in Round 1 of allocations in September.Southern Districts received the grant to assist with the purchase of a new line marker and a coaching development program for their association to increase junior participation levels.If your affiliate/assoication applied in Round 1 there is no need to reapply for Round 2 as your application will be automatically re-entered for round 2.Winners will be announced during the week of 4 December 2006.For an application form and further information visit the Sports Cover websitelast_img read more

Jennifer Podemski honoured for years of giving a voice to Indigenous stories

first_imgBeverly AndrewsAPTN NewsJennifer Podemski was given the Award of Excellence at the ACTRA awards in Toronto over the weekend for her work on and off the screen in Canadian film and television.During her speech she offered how Indigenous people can change the narrative set by colonialism.“If we’re not involved in film and television then we can’t change the narrative, we can’t, you know, tell our own stories and I think what’ s happening or what has happened over time,” she said. “You know the colonial experience has been celebrated and perpetuated sort of rendering the Indigenous voices almost silent.”It’s people like Podemski that has worked so hard to keep them from staying silent said Theresa Tova, president of ACTRA Toronto.“She has been so inspirational for so long, first of all as a fabulous actor, and then a writer and producer,” said Tova.Podemski began her career in 1988 as a background performer.As her career grew, she was aware there was a lack of Indigenous writers, producers and directors.So she started a company and became co-owner of Big Soul Productions, which produced the award-winning TV series Moccasin Flats in 2003.In 2005, she founded RedCloud Studios, dedicated to showcasing Indigenous narratives.“I always dreamed of becoming a performer just from when I was little,” she said. “If you know that’s what you want to do, you kinda just have to figure out a way to do it,” she said.bandrews@aptn.calast_img read more

Ocean Park Hong Kong celebrates its 40th Anniversary

first_imgTo mark its 40th Anniversary, Ocean Park has officially launched a year-long celebration that would feature a host of activities and special offers under the theme of ‘Making Memories’. The festivities kicked off with a limited-time offer for Hong Kong residents where local residents were able to purchase admission tickets for just HK$40 from the Park’s official website between January 11 to 22, 2017. Limited to 4,000 locals per day, these special tickets were valid for entry on any chosen day between January 16 to 22, 2017.At the ceremony, the Park unveiled a number of special programmes including a community-care initiative– a collaboration between Ocean Park, Chinachem Group and 18 District Councils and the Park’s first-ever partnership with Modern Education Research Society Ltd (Modern Education Research Society) to create exclusive, conservation-oriented educational materials for local kindergartens. The Park also revealed the results of the popular ‘Making Memories’ Photo Contest, and recognised current and retired long-serving staff.Additionally, Ocean Park has also launched an extensive series of merchandise in collaboration with well-known local and international brands, including Kee Wah Bakery, Chicks, Ten Ren Tea, LeSportsac and Wooderful Life.The Park is also offering classic Hong Kong street food from the 70s with a modern twist, which would be available for a whole year from January 10, 2017. Guests can indulge in contemporary fusion cuisine with the ‘Rediscovering Classics’ 40th Anniversary Set Menu as well as à la carte items at selected Park restaurants. A limited-edition Whiskers & Friends 40th Anniversary Jumbo Goblet with a snack set would also be available at designated food kiosks.The launch ceremony was officiated by C Y Leung, Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Gregory So Kam-Leung, Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development; Cathy Chu Man-ling, Commissioner for Tourism; Dr Peter Lam, Chairman of Hong Kong Tourism Board; Payson Cha; Philip Chen and Dr Allan Zeman, the Park’s past Chairmen along with Leo Kung, Chairman of Ocean Park; Lau Ming-wai, Deputy Chairman of Ocean Park; Judy Chen, Chair of Ocean Park Conservation Foundation Hong Kong and Matthias Li, Chief Executive of Ocean Park.Leo Kung, Chairman of Ocean Park, said, “Ocean Park is Hong Kong’s home-grown and premier theme park. We are honoured to have helped create lasting memories for generations of the city’s residents over the past 40 years, as well as welcome over 140 million guests. From humble beginnings with just 12 attractions, the Park has evolved into a world-class theme park. As we celebrate our 40th Anniversary, we will not rest on our laurels and are already getting set to unveil the next phase of Ocean Park’s development, including two new hotels and Water World.”“All of our achievements would not have been possible without the entire Ocean Park family, and I would like thank our staff, past and present, for their hard work, dedication and contributions throughout the years, which helped Ocean Park achieve recognition as one of the world’s top 13 theme parks. On this momentous occasion, I would also like to give a special thanks to The Hong Kong Jockey Club for funding the Park’s construction and operation from 1977 to 1987, and helping to bring so much joy to our city,” Kung added.last_img read more

Rep Markkanen to host teletown hall meeting

first_img State Rep. Greg Markkanen will host a tele-town hall meeting Tuesday, June 18, for residents to ask questions about the upcoming change in Michigan’s car insurance system. Markkanen will be joined by Speaker Pro Tempore and Chairman of the select committee on reducing car insurance rates, Jason Wentworth.“Last month, I was happy to cast my vote to lower car insurance rates for drivers across the state,” Rep. Markkanen said. “Speaker Pro Tem Wentworth has worked tirelessly on this issue. I am excited for my constituents to be able to ask questions and learn more about the new law.”The tele-town hall will begin at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Those wishing to participate may call 1-855-756-7520 Ext. 48670# toll-free.For more information, contact Rep. Markkanen’s office by calling (517) 373-0850 or by email at GregMarkkanen@house.mi.gov 17Jun Rep. Markkanen to host tele-town hall meeting Categories: Markkanen Newslast_img read more

Belgacom added 65000 TV subscribers in the first

first_imgBelgacom added 65,000 TV subscribers in the first quarter of the year and said that “solid revenue growth for TV” helped to boost underlying core revenue. Announcing its Q1 results, the Belgian telco said that its TV customer base reached 1.66 million customers, up 9.4% year-on-year.“The first-quarter 2015 TV revenue grew by 14.8% to €79 million, as a result of continued subscriber growth, and TV-options such as football subscriptions and TV-replay,” said Belgacom.The company said that recurring TV ARPU grew by 6.1% year-on-year to €19.90, driven by the increased uptake of TV options.Overall, Belgacom said that underlying first quarter revenue came to €1.479 billion, an increase of 5.5% compared to the first-quarter of 2014. Underlying group EBITDA totalled €423 million, 3.8% higher compared to the previous year.last_img read more

Altice is to spin off its US operation and restruc

first_imgAltice is to spin off its US operation and restructure its European and pay TV assets in a major reorganisation that saw its share price rise sharply. Company founder Patrick Drahi will take direct control of both European and US operations.Altice is to separate Altice USA from the parent company by spinning off its 67.2% stake in the company. Altice will be split into two separate companies – Altice USA and the renamed Altice Europe. Altice said that the move would enable each business to focus more on the distinct opportunities for value creation in their respective markets and ensure greater transparency for investorsThe company plans to complete the change by the end of Q2, pending regulatory and shareholder approval.The US spin-off will be completed through a distribution in kind to Altice shareholders. Following the split Patrick Drahi will retain control of both companies through his Next investment vehicle. Drahi will also serve as president of Altice Europe and chairman of Altice USA.Altice Europe will be reorganised into three new units – Altice France, which will look after French and French overseas assets, notably SFR; Altice international; and a new Altice Pay TV subsidiary. The creation of the latter will see Altice Europe’s premium content activities bundled into a separately funded unit with its own P&L.Patrick Drahi“The separation will allow both Altice Europe and Altice USA to focus on their respective operations and execute against their strategies, deliver value for shareholders, and realise their full potential. Both operations will have the fundamental Altice Model at their heart through my close personal involvement as well as that of the historic founding team,” said Drahi.Drahi said that Altice Europe would focus on turning around the operational and financial performance of its French and Portuguese units and on the sale of non-core assets.Dennis Okhuijsen will serve as CEO and a director of Altice Europe, reporting to Drahi. Armando Pereira, a close collaborator of Drahi, will serve as COO of Altice Europe and serve as strategic advisor to Altice USA for all operations.The new pay TV unit will include the Altice content division, major sports rights and other premium content rights. Altice France will cancel its existing wholesale pay TV contracts for the content and channels being transferred to Altice Pay TV and will become a wholesale customer of Altice Pay TV with a new revenue sharing contract and what the company described as a “significantly reduced annual minimum guarantee”. Altice France will pay about €300 million to Altice Pay TV as a “break fee”.This move is designed to assuage investor concerns about the impact of Altice’s investment in premium content on the underlying network business. Altice said that the move would enable investors to better assess Altice France’s performance against its competitors. The change is expected to give a significant boost to Altice France’s free cash flow.Altice USA’s independent directors have meanwhile approved a US$1.5 billion (€1.25 billion) cash dividend for shareholders prior to completion of the spin off. Altice will receive €900 million of this, €625 million of which will be used to repay debt, with €275 million to remain on the balance sheet.Dexter Goei will continue to serve as CEO and a Director of Altice USA, also reporting to Drahi as chairman.Altice’s shares jumped by 10% on the news after a period in which the troubled telecom group’s stock lost about half its value, following its unveiling of poor Q3 results at the end of November.last_img read more

Todays article comes to us from Dr Joel Wade a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from Dr. Joel Wade, a world traveler, former NCAA champion and highly regarded specialist in the study of true happiness (rather than the superficial nonsense touted by today’s pop psychologists).] It’s good to have a back-up plan, or a plan B, especially in uncertain times; but it’s also important to remember that this is only for when your plan A is threatened. Often, the best thing you can do is to fully commit to your primary vision; sometimes the best defense is a good offense. It’s excellent to have a plan that you can fall back on if things don’t work out, but today, I want to talk about some elements of committing to your plan A (i.e. staying put) that can be easily neglected… because we take them for granted. If you’re thinking of moving away from your home, be it out of state or out of the country, before you do so, consider what you will be leaving behind. If you have family and friends where you live, if you have neighbors whom you know and who know you, those relationships can be a tremendous source of security and support. If you’ve always had these people in your life, you may not even think how much you depend on your connection with them. I don’t just mean that you know you could ask them for help if you need it; there is something extremely valuable, for your health and happiness and overall wellbeing, to having regular human contact with people whom you know and trust. Relationships are built on trust. You can enjoy any positive interaction with a fellow human being, even if it’s a friendly hello at the grocery store or a smile as you walk by on the street. But when you know and trust people and see them in person, make eye contact, shake hands or hug, and can settle into a comfortable conversation, the positive benefits are huge. If you intend to move away from these relationships, it’s important to acknowledge and accept that you will be losing something valuable. Our relationships can be the most fundamental source of joy and satisfaction in life. The positive contact we have with people improves our heart rate variability and our immune system and reduces inflammation. It also just plain feels good. Also, your long term, trust-based relationships are people who are more likely to be there for you – and you for them – if trouble strikes. When our kids were little, we talked about whom they know in the neighborhood. If there was ever any trouble, which houses could they run to? Which neighbors do we know well enough to trust? There were (and are) many to choose from, but a few top the list. That’s a great thing to have when there are kids involved, but it’s still important if there’s just one or two of you. We have neighbors across the street who are well into their 80s. They are two of the people whom our kids knew they could trust and go to if there was ever trouble. They’re our friends. We take time with them, and keep an eye on them, and if they need anything, they know they can ask us. That’s good for them, but it’s also good for us. It’s great to have people you trust, but it’s also deeply satisfying to be somebody who is trustworthy. That’s what true friendship is built on. It’s that mutual sense of trust that takes time and experience to build. If you’re thinking of moving, and doing so includes leaving town, be sure to factor in the loss of contact and support, and the loss of years and possibly decades of earned and established trust with people whose relationships you may have, to some degree, taken for granted. Another element of your plan A that can be overlooked is familiarity. If you’ve lived somewhere for a long time, you know things about the area that you didn’t when you first moved there. You know the roads, the stores, the restaurants. You know the terrain, the weather; you know the nearby towns. You probably know some “secret” driving routes to avoid traffic. You also probably know who puts on a good roof, or can take care of a plumbing or electrical problem dependably. Of course you can learn all of this over time in a new location. But you know them now right where you are. Then there’s the political aspect. If we are to have a country that values individual liberty and self-responsibility – and true win/win capitalism, as opposed to win/lose crony capitalism – it is people who need to advocate, argue, and fight for this, right here at home. What the Tea Partiers have been focused on during the past couple of years is mostly at the local, grassroots level. If you happen to be a high profile, politically active, charismatic person with high name recognition nationally or throughout your state, you may be able to have a big impact – as people like Senators Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and others are having now. But most of us do not have that big of a national presence. Where we can have a big impact, though, is locally, among the people and the community who knows us and trusts us. Effective persuasion does not come through bullying, nagging, or threatening. Effective persuasion comes through building relationships of trust and respect. When people know you, trust you, and respect you, they are more likely to listen to what you have to say. You may have a greater sphere of influence within your own community than you realize, because you may not think much about all of the daily contact you have with different folks. A friend of mine once said, “If you want to have a successful business, don’t move.” By living your life with benevolence and integrity, by settling into a place and treating people well over time, you build for yourself a community of people with whom you share trust, respect, joy, and history. You build for yourself a home. That is a successful plan A. And it’s a much more valuable resource than you might think. You can move somewhere else, and build it there, too, but it takes time, effort, and patience. If that’s necessary, or if you weigh all the options and moving away is the best one, that’s fine; just make sure that in pursuing your plan B, you’re not casting aside a perfectly good plan A. [Joel F. Wade, Ph.D. is the author of Mastering Happiness. He is a marriage and family therapist and life coach who works with people around the world via phone and Skype. You can get a FREE Learning Optimism E-Course if you sign up at his website, www.drjoelwade.com.] FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

first_img— – Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry DirectorSean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Get Ready:This Wednesday at 8 pm, Porter Stansberry, founder of Stansberry Research, will host an exclusive live webinar called: “How to Profit from the Greatest Transfer of Wealth in History.” You won’t want to miss this… click here to reserve your seat. Critical Warning to Anyone Who Was Born Before 1969We just got exclusive information obtained from an “invitation-only” meeting in Washington, D.C. Some of the most powerful people in finance gathered behind closed doors to discuss a secret deal… one that could have a major impact on your finances, especially if you were born before 1969. If you’re a senior and rely on the government for income, you’ll be badly hurt if this deal gets inked. Click here to see the details. – Recommended Links Doug: Scandinavia is on a slippery slope. I wouldn’t be surprised if a very nasty “black swan” the size of a pterodactyl landed there. The U.S. isn’t far behind. Big Brother is coming out of the cellar, where he’s been chained up, in the U.S. And I’m afraid he’s so strong and nasty that few people will be able to pay him enough to leave them alone.There have long been local pockets of notorious corruption in the U.S., of course; building inspectors, people like that. On a national level, the DEA became very corrupt early on, a natural consequence of “regulating” an industry that runs on billions in cash.Other federal agencies are more subtly corrupt. Generals are paid off by being hired by defense contractors after they’re mustered out. FDA types are hired by the drug companies and large agribusinesses, and executives from those companies become high-level bureaucrats in the FDA. Politicians rarely take envelopes of cash anymore. They wait until they are out of office to collect millions in directors’ fees, book deals, speaking tours, stock deals, and the like. Bill Clinton is a perfect example of someone who went from near penniless to a net worth of $50 million-plus overnight. The Clintons have made a huge leap from the days when Hillary had to take a $100,000 payoff in the guise of her totally transparent cattle-trading scheme.The problem now, though, is that there are giant police bureaucracies like the TSA and the FBI that have no direct way of getting paid off. So they enforce the idiotic laws like robots. Other bureaucracies like NSA do their damage remotely, too far from the victim to be negotiated with. This is a real source of danger.Doug Casey is a multi-millionaire speculator and the founder of Casey Research. He literally wrote the book on profiting during economic turmoil. Doug’s book, Crisis Investing, spent multiple weeks as number one on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the best-selling financial book of 1980. Doug has been a regular guest on national television, including spots on CNN, Merv Griffin, Charlie Rose, Regis Philbin, Phil Donahue, and NBC News.Doug and his team of analysts write The Casey Report, one of the world’s most respected investment advisories. Each month, The Casey Report provides specific, actionable ideas to help subscribers make money in stocks, bonds, currencies, real estate, and commodities. You can try out The Casey Report risk-free by clicking here. L: It’s interesting: These countries where a high degree of legal regulation seems to work are also highly homogeneous and have very powerful cultures; makes you wonder if the laws are really doing anything at all, or if they are just window dressing on more powerful social systems.It makes me think of the many experimental societies tried out in the 19th century in the U.S., when there were still open frontiers to which one could escape with like-minded people and try to do things differently. Most were communes. And most were disasters. Some worked, and a few even still exist in vestigial form today, like the Amana colonies. Those that worked best were religious communes. Just goes to show that if you can go beyond homogeneity and get unanimity, you can create a society that seems to defy all experience to the contrary. When everyone buys in, amazing things can happen…at least for a while.Doug: Almost anything can work for a while. Some monasteries approach an almost perfect state of communism. It’s possible because everyone there chooses to be there and live according to those rules. Unanimous consent. But that’s not possible in an entire country, and even the super-majority buy-in of highly homogeneous cultures like New Zealand and Scandinavia is not possible in 98% of the rest of the countries in the world. If you look at the rest of the world, the more socialistic and regulated the country, the more corrupt it tends to be. And the larger the country, the more disparate the population and divergent the mores, the less effective the government’s regulation.L: That would cover China, Russia…Brazil, Mexico.Doug: And Argentina, where I am now. The customs inspectors down here, for example, all expect to retire as multimillionaires. That’s because they have so many laws on what you can export or import…how, when, and why, it’s almost impossible to comply with, or even know, all the laws. It’s much cheaper and easier to get the inspector to look the other way with a well-placed envelope.There’s good news and bad news in this.In itself, corruption is a bad thing; it shouldn’t have to be necessary. As I touched on earlier, insofar as it’s necessary, it’s also a good thing. If we can’t eliminate the laws that give rise to corruption, it’s a good thing that it’s possible to circumvent these laws. The worst of all situations is to have a mass of strict, stultifying, economically suicidal laws…and also have strict, effective enforcement of those laws. If a culture doesn’t allow people to work around stupid laws, that culture’s doom is further sealed with every stupid law passed, which is pretty much all of them.L: Strict laws, strictly enforced, is a recipe for paralysis. I’ve often said that while Mexico is much less free than the U.S. on paper, it is much more free in fact. People in the U.S. fear their government, especially the IRS. In Mexico, people build what they want, eat what they want, sell what they want; tax evasion is the national pastime.Doug: Right. This is one of the reasons why, though I’ve lived in New Zealand quite a bit over the last 10 years, I’m not really interested in hanging my spurs there any longer. Although it’s gotten vastly better since the reforms of the mid-’80s, it’s still a dull, insular place with a lot of ingrained socialist attitudes, but not much corruption to help you obviate them. And I wouldn’t want to live in the Scandinavian countries either.They have all these incredibly stupid laws that sheep-like residents obey, enabling great tyranny, but it goes unrecognized because it has such popular support. It suits me much better to live in a place like Argentina, where there’s an equal number of stupid laws, but nobody pays any attention to them. And when there is a problem, it can most often be handled, informally.L: I won’t ask you on the record if you’ve ever actually done that. Interesting comment about Scandinavia: I was just reading Google News yesterday, and one of the top video news stories was a clip about some poor woman in Sweden who’s had her twin daughters taken away by the child protection busybodies. The children were taken, without notice, from their school, and the woman didn’t even know it was an official abduction until she got a letter a week later. The real horror of it is that there isn’t actually any evidence of wrongdoing on the woman’s part. The law is preemptive and protective; the bureaucrats are authorized to remove children from their families if there might be danger to them. No due process, and forget about “innocent until proven guilty.” The breathtaking assumption is that it’s better to rip children out of their families than to find out if there’s a real problem first. This could only hold sway in a place where the culture is one of great confidence in the wisdom and benevolence of the state. “They’ll do everything they can to push the price of gold down.”This statement was made by keynote speaker and trend forecaster Gerald Celente at the 2015 Casey Research Summit. Find out what Mr. Celente has to say about gold manipulation…the Federal Reserve’s hidden scheme…and how you can protect yourself from it right here. (Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)This interview was first published on February 9, 2011Editor’s Note: In yesterday’s Weekend Edition, Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why laws and regulations can’t stop corruption. Today, Doug explains why corruption in government can actually be a good thing….Louis James: I think the point of government-sponsored irresponsibility is particularly important, and often overlooked.I’ve long thought that it was FDR’s New Deal that really pushed America over the edge, not so much because of the economic cost, but because it made it very clear to people that they did not need to be responsible for themselves. Big Brother now takes care of them when they get old, or should they fall ill, or lose a job; no need to plan ahead or save… It’s no wonder our culture has transformed from one of individualism and self-reliance to one of groupthink and reliance on the state, populated by entitlement-minded couch potatoes.But what do you say to people who point to places like Sweden, a highly government-regulated society that seems to work? Such a nice, clean place, with lots of government.Doug: It’s a good point. Sweden is at the low end of the corruption scale, but it’s not because they have laws against corruption; everybody has those. It’s because of the culture; the peer pressure, moral opprobrium, and social approbation I mentioned earlier. Sweden is a small country where word of misdeeds spreads quickly. It has a highly homogeneous culture based on deep-rooted traditions, and there’s a high degree of consensus about how things should be. That makes Swedes cooperate with the large body of law that reflects that consensus, much more than would happen almost anywhere else, or is even possible anywhere else.Out of a couple hundred countries in the world outside of Scandinavia, I can think of two other places that have a similarly powerful culture that makes a “big-government” approach to managing society seem to work: New Zealand and Uruguay. These places are small, relatively isolated, homogeneous, and with powerful cultural traditions that have, unfortunately, been codified into law. These countries, coincidentally, also have the three oldest socialist governments in the world, all dating back to the turn of the 20th century. Trying to bribe officials in these places, even Uruguay, is pretty much out of the question.But these places are anomalous. Because of their rare characteristics, they can’t be held up as role models for other places. Almost everywhere else, where there’s more diversity of ethnicity, culture, much larger population, and so forth, Scandinavian socialism wouldn’t even have the appearance of working. And, I’d argue, it won’t work much longer in Scandinavia either; Sweden and these other places will ultimately collapse under the weight of their mass of laws and socialist intervention in their economies. Recommended Links —last_img read more

It was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 am

first_imgIt was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 a.m. on a January morning. Her son Jeff had been caught using drugs in a New Hampshire sober home and was being kicked out.Bea and her husband, Doug Duncan, drove north that night nine years ago to pick Jeff up. On the ride back home, to Natick, Mass., the parents delivered an ultimatum: Their son had to go back to rehab, or leave home.Jeff chose the latter, Bea says. She remembers a lot of yelling, cursing and tears as they stopped the car, in the dead of night, a few miles from the house.”It was really, really difficult to actually just drop him off in a parking lot on our way home and say, ‘you made the decision — no rehab — so we made the decision, no home,’ ” Bea says. “It was exquisitely difficult.”Doug Duncan says many parents had told him to expect this moment. He remembers them saying their son would have to “hit rock bottom; you’re going to have to kick him out of the house.”Two torturous days later, Jeff Duncan came home. Although he returned to rehab, the Duncans decided their approach wasn’t working. They sought help, eventually connecting with a program that, instead of tough love, stresses empathy: CRAFT or Community Reinforcement and Family Training.”There was more compassion and, ‘Wow, this is really difficult for you’; more open questions to him instead of dictating what he should and should not behave like,” says Bea. Many drug users say, in hindsight, they’ve appreciated being forced into treatment. But studies show that a compassionate approach and voluntary treatment are the more effective ways to engage drug users in recovery and keep them alive. That’s a critical consideration for families in this era of fentanyl, a powerful opioid that can shut down breathing in seconds.”The concept of letting their children hit bottom is not the best strategy,” says Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Because in hitting bottom they may die.”After they went through CRAFT training, the Duncans say things started to shift from chaos to calm.”I started to feel an immense sense of relief,” Bea says. “I stopped feeling like I had to be a private investigator and controlling mom. I could kind of walk side-by-side with him on this journey, instead of feeling like I had to take charge of it.”For the Duncans, the approach meant they could switch from enforcing family consequences, like kicking Jeff out of the house, to supporting him as he faced other challenges, like losing a job because of his drug use.It worked well: Bea and Doug helped Jeff stick to his recovery. He’s 28 now and has been sober for nine years.But desperate parents often don’t know how to avoid “hitting bottom” with their children, as the Duncans did on that dark and frigid January morning. The Duncans have found ways to help others: Doug is a parent coach through the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which is now collaborating with the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center.The collaboration will close a gap in services for families caught up in the opioid epidemic, says Grayken Center’s director, Michael Botticelli, who served as drug czar in the Obama administration.”They don’t call this a family disease for no good reason,” Botticelli says. “The whole design of these services [is] to promote tools and information for families, so they know how to approach a situation and can heal.”There is no uniform path to healing for the drug user or parents, and no widespread agreement on the best approach for families.Joanne Peterson, who founded the parent support network Learn to Cope, says there are reasons why some parents ask older children to leave the house — if there are younger children at home or if the parents don’t feel safe.”So it depends on what ‘tough love’ means; it can mean many different things,” Peterson says.She applauds the Grayken Center for expanding access to parent coaches, but “we also need more professional help.” Peterson says she routinely hears from parents who can’t find counselors and doctors who understand their daily traumas.Some critics suggest the CRAFT model is too soft, that it enables drug use.”That’s a misconception,” says Fred Muench, president of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “CRAFT is authoritative parenting, creating a sense of responsibility in the child, and at the same time saying, ‘I am here for you; I love you; I’m going to help you; but I can’t help you avoid negative consequences if you’re not looking to do that on your own.’ “The parent coaching extends beyond periods of crisis.On a recent afternoon, Doug Duncan was on the phone with Doreen, a mom whose daughter is in recovery. (We’re using only Doreen’s first name to protect her daughter’s privacy.) Doreen was upset about an angry text from her daughter that sounded like the messages the young woman sent when she was using drugs.”It brings me back there. In two seconds, I am back on that scene thinking she’s on the heroin, she’s not going to live,” Doreen told Duncan, expressing a very common fear of a loved one’s relapse.In a panic — her daughter had overdosed twice and been rescued — Doreen wanted to ask if she was using heroin again. But she ran it by Duncan first. He encouraged her to talk it through.Doreen paused, then said she could ask her daughter about work — whether it’s been stressful — or about her grief after a friend’s recent death. There are many reasons, Doreen realized, that her daughter might be angry. Her tone didn’t have to signal a relapse.”You talk yourself off the cliff,” Duncan told her.”Oh yes, I know all about that cliff, I’ve visited a few times before,” Doreen said, and laughed. “You know, that ties in with what you said before about focusing less on what your feelings are, and the terror or fear that you’re going through, and more on what they’re feeling and what they’re going through — turn the tables a bit. That’s an excellent point.””That’s true compassion,” Duncan told her, “and oddly enough it’s very therapeutic for you, too.”More compassion in the home fits the shift away from criminalizing addiction — toward accepting and treating it as a chronic medical condition.If a child had cancer, parents “wouldn’t disengage with them or be angry with them,” says Botticelli. “So I do think it aligns our scientific understanding that addiction is a disease and not a moral failure.”This story is part of NPR’s partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more

A group of disabled activists – led by a crossbenc

first_imgA group of disabled activists – led by a crossbench peer – are to intervene in a legal case for the first time next week, in a bid to persuade three high court judges not to weaken the law to allow assisted suicide.Not Dead Yet UK (NDY UK), a campaign group of disabled people opposed to a change in the law on assisted suicide, has been granted the right to intervene in the high-profile judicial review being taken by Noel Conway, who is terminally-ill.Conway is taking a case against the Ministry of Justice, and wants the court to find that the Suicide Act – which makes it illegal to assist someone to take their own life – is incompatible with articles eight (on the right to a private and family life) and 14 (which prohibits discrimination) of the European Convention on Human Rights.NDY UK, led by its founder, the disabled peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell, had just 10 days to put together its legal submission to the high court, after being granted permission to intervene in the case, but even then was only allowed to submit 20 pages of legal arguments.It is now hoping the three high court judges hearing the case will also allow NDY UK to submit a witness statement from Baroness Campbell herself, and permit NDY UK’s barrister, Catherine Casserley, of Cloisters chambers, to respond to the arguments of Conway’s legal team in court.If NDY UK wins the right to be heard orally in court, it could even risk bankruptcy if Conway wins his case and the judges make an order that the campaign group should pay some of his lawyers’ costs.Baroness Campbell and her members were only able to secure their status as interveners in the case because their two lawyers, Casserley and solicitor Chris Fry, of Fry Law, offered to work pro bono.Although they are on the same side as the Ministry of Justice, which is also fighting a change in the law, they are facing a well-funded team from solicitors Irwin Mitchell, backed by the substantial financial resources of the campaign group Dignity in Dying, formerly known as the Voluntary Euthanasia Society.Baroness Campbell told Disability News Service: “This is David and Goliath.“It always tends to be those organisations not run and controlled by disabled people that get the cash. That does stick in the throat a bit.“Whether you agree with assisted suicide, you should have a balanced opportunity to hear both views and I fear the [judges are] in jeopardy of not hearing all the views which [they need] to hear in order to make a good judgement.”It is the first time NDY UK has intervened in a legal case on assisted suicide in the 12 years since it was founded by Baroness Campbell.Their case has relied on disabled activists from NDY UK, the pro bono work of Fry and Casserley, and support from its sister organisation in the USA, Not Dead Yet, and its president and founder, Diane Coleman, as well as law students from both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University.Conway argues that the current law prevents him exercising his right to choice and control over his death.He said earlier this year: “I know I am going to die anyway, but how and when should be up to me.“To have the option of an assisted death in this country would provide me with great reassurance and comfort.“It would allow me to decide when I am ready to go, rather than be forced into a premature death by travelling abroad or be left at the mercy of a cruel illness.”But Baroness Campbell, who plans to attend court for the first day of the judicial review on Monday (17 July), said the prospect of a change in the law was “terrifying”, which was why she and fellow activists had decided that NDY UK must intervene in the court case.In the witness statement – which may not be accepted by the court – Baroness Campbell says that any ruling in favour of Conway would “impact negatively on the lives of other terminally ill and disabled people”.She says it would “damage beyond repair the way in which society views the elderly, sick and disabled to the point where the Equality Act itself and the protection which it provides becomes fundamentally defective”.She adds: “I (and the hundreds of disabled and terminally ill members of NDY UK), want people to understand that it is perfectly possible to have a fulfilling and enjoyable life whilst living with a substantial, progressive condition.”She hopes to tell the court that continuing cuts to health and care services would mean that disabled and terminally-ill people “may become more inclined towards considering desperate options such as assisted suicide”, if it was legalised.The writer and activist Penny Pepper, another NDY UK member, who is quoted in Baroness Campbell’s witness statement, says: “The massive publicity machine working for those who promote assisted suicide drowns out the ‘small voices’ of disabled people who want support to live, not die.”Another member, Felicity Wright, warns that legalisation would destroy the doctor-patient relationship, and that doctors are “amongst the very last people I would trust to have a balanced opinion about the quality of my life”.Baroness Campbell, whose own impairment, spinal muscular atrophy, leaves her in a similar physical situation to Conway, who has motor neurone disease, says she identifies with and understands his fears of the possible death he might face due to an eventual “physical shutdown”.But she says that “parliament has concluded that legalisation would be ‘a dangerous and inappropriate way to tackle end of life fears’”*.She adds: “In every country where assisted suicide has been made legal, original safeguards have been watered down, allowing the parameters to widen and include people that were outside of the original legislation.“There is no reason that this would not happen in the UK, and frankly I predict it will.”Fry, who worked with fellow discrimination law expert Casserley on another high-profile disability rights case, which saw their client Doug Paulley win a ground-breaking legal victory that protected the rights of wheelchair-users to travel on buses, said he felt an “overwhelming sense of responsibility” about the case.He said he had been involved in other high-profile cases which have changed the law – including Paulley’s – but “this is the one that carries for me the greatest sense of personal responsibility because ultimately the issues being decided in this case will affect almost everybody in today’s society”.He said a change in the law would have a “multi-layered impact across the whole of society” and would undermine the Equality Act, which is “founded on the concept that we should do more to empower people and to give an effective right to life and a right to an engaged, fulfilling and accessible and inclusive life.“If you suddenly start saying it’s about the right to die and start unravelling it all, you’re unravelling a quarter of a century of positive equality legislation and case law.“This, for me, is probably the biggest case I will be involved in in my career, because of the significant responsibility that comes with trying to ensure the voices of disabled people are heard as part of this judicial process.”He said there was a “serious threat” that Conway could win, as Dignity in Dying and its lawyers had spent a “significant amount of time and money” in preparing their case since the last attempts to change the law, on behalf of Tony Nicklinson and two other disabled men, ended in failure at the Supreme Court three years ago.Fry said: “This poses a real threat that the law will be changed. If we lose this case and subsequently it gets as far as the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court decides that assisted dying should be legal, that’s it.”In her legal submission to the court on behalf of NDY UK, Casserley warns that the court is being asked to create “a climate in which a disabled person is seen as a burden and the option of a course which involves termination of life becomes routine”.She asks the court to consider not only Conway’s rights, but those of the other disabled and terminally ill people “who will be potentially affected adversely by the Court’s decision and the message that this conveys to them”.She adds: “NDYUK has significant concerns that if society indicates that as a disabled or terminally ill person assisted dying is an option open to them there is a risk of application of internal pressure derived from a value system which views disability negatively.”*Nearly two years ago, the latest attempt to change the law in parliament was heavily defeated, with MPs voting 330 to 118 against a private members’ bill put forward by Labour MP Rob Marris that would have legalised assisted suicide for people said to have up to six months to live.last_img read more

Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods

first_img This story originally appeared on PCMag Add to Queue Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods Why drag someone around a mall when you can leave them happily playing games while you buy stuff? –shares China Enroll Now for $5 Matthew Humphries Image credit: via PC Magcenter_img 2 min read Visiting a mall can be a tiring and frustrating experience, especially if you really don’t like shopping. So one mall in China came up with a solution specifically targeted at all those husbands who accompany their wives but really don’t enjoy shopping.According to the BBC, they are called “husband storage” and take the form of a glass cubicle or pod. Inside you’ll find a comfortable chair and access to a range of video games from the ’90s. Initially use of the pods is free, but there’s plans to introduce a charge payable by smartphone to access and use them. According to Chinese website The Paper, the pods are popular, but also lacking in a few key areas. The biggest complaint so far is a lack of air conditioning, which means you are sitting in a glass cubicle sweating while playing.I think there’s also a missed opportunity here to sell users of the pods cold drinks and snacks. It wouldn’t be difficult to integrate a vending machine into the back or side of the pods, but it could result in greasy gaming pads.If the pods get really popular I can see banks of them being installed just like in internet cafes. Then they can be networked together to allow for multiplayer gaming. Before you know it we’ll have stories about people living out of them while playing online games all day.Social media in China is apparently split on whether the pods are a good idea or not. On the one hand it could encourage partners to go to the mall with their spouse, but on the other, what’s the point if all they are going to do is disappear inside a glass box? July 17, 2017 Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article Senior Editor Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful.last_img read more

Health benefits of producing marula vinegar

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 27 2018Marula vinegar produced from waste by-products was found to be a potential source of health promoting compounds including total phenolics and flavonoids with good antioxidant properties.Marula is a well-known indigenous plant in South Africa, and the fruit is used to make the legendary Amarula cream liquor.Molelekoa and colleagues investigated the feasibility of using marula fruit waste sourced from a processing plant as feedstock for vinegar (acetic acid) production. They used two fermentation techniques (surface and submerged culture methods) using both naturally occurring and inoculated bacteria. The surface culture method combined with inoculation produced a higher-quality vinegar with potential for commercial-scale production. A consumer survey recommended the application of the vinegar in products such as salad dressing and mayonnaise. Source:https://www.sajs.co.za/last_img read more

Opel to offload 2000 jobs to French engineering firm

first_imgThe restructuring of Opel has already begun to bear fruit as it swung back into profit in the first half of this year. The carmaker last booked a profit in 1999 Citation: Opel to offload 2,000 jobs to French engineering firm (2018, September 5) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-opel-offload-jobs-french-firm.html Explore further Opel, which was bought by French auto giant PSA last year, said it was discussing a possible “strategic partnership” with Segula “to protect engineering jobs in Ruesselsheim and to overcome the workload decrease from third parties”. Opel CEO Michael Lohscheller said in a statement that the automaker faced a “heavily decreasing” workload at its R&D centre, as engineers finish off the last contracts for former owner General Motors.The proposed deal still needs to be approved by Opel’s powerful works council.If it goes ahead, Segula intends to take over “up to 2,000” of Opel’s 7,000 development centre employees as well as several buildings at the Ruesselsheim site just outside Frankfurt.Segula has promised to safeguard jobs until 2023, echoing a deal struck between Opel and union leaders. No financial details were revealed but Lohscheller told reporters in a conference call that Segula would set up a new company to house the employees, in which Opel would have no stake.Segula said it wanted to create “a core engineering centre” in Ruesselsheim that would not just focus on the automobile industry but also sectors “such as rail and energy”.Loss-plagued Opel, sold under the Vauxhall brand in Britain, has embarked on an ambitious restructuring since it was taken over by PSA.It aims to achieve 1.1 billion euros in savings by 2020, mainly through voluntary redundancies and by sharing equipment and technology with its parent company.The cost-cutting measures appear to be paying off, with Opel dramatically swinging back to profit in the first half of 2018.Under General Motors, the lightning logo carmaker last booked a profit in 1999. German carmaker Opel on Wednesday said it planned to shift some 2,000 jobs at its historic Ruesselsheim research and development hub to French engineering group Segula Technologies, in a bid to avoid job cuts under a major turnaround plan.center_img © 2018 AFP PSA Peugeot Citroen rides to higher sales, backed by Opel Vauxhall This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more