McLeish overcome difficulties as Scotland record easy win

first_imgScotland national team head coach Alex McLeish has revealed his team overcame their problems to defeat Albania.The former Aston Villa manager was under enormous pressure heading into the game against Albania following consecutive losses to Israel and Portugal.However, despite having an injury-depleted squad with nine withdrawals, Scotland defeated 10-man Albania 4-0 at the Loro Borici Stadium in Shkoder to take them within a game of a play-off spot.McLeish now turns his attention to their final UEFA Nations League game against Israel and he insists he has a positive feeling heading into the game.Euro 2020Report: Euro 2020 qualifying Group H George Patchias – September 11, 2019 Euro 2020 qualifying Group H is being controlled by France and Turkey, but Iceland is still in with a shout.Reigning world champions France ran…“Obviously you don’t know the outcome before the games starts but I had a feeling about it,” he said, according to Sky Sports.“I felt that if the players brought their performance level to the game then the outcome would be positive and that’s the way it turned out.”“It was an exceptionally professional performance from our lads. There was a look of familiarity about them and there were great performances. It’s hard to single one out.”last_img read more

Model Railroader Launches Paid Video Site

first_imgWith video initiatives of its own that began in 2008—MR currently has about 500 videos and will continue to update its library going forward—Keefe says the magazine’s site served 1.5 million video views last year, up from 1.2 million in 2011. MR currently draws about 200,000 unique visitors and 1.5 million pageviews per month and has a circulation of more than 131,000, per the Alliance for Audited Media.Annual subscriptions to MR Video Plus cost $52.95, though they’re being offered for $32.95 to subscribers of the magazine. Monthly options are also available at $4.95.Interestingly, MR Video Plus’ price is higher than the magazine’s ($42.95/year).”The pricing reflects the costs,” Keefe says. “[That price point] was a simple mechanism of the cost to launch the site and what it’s going to cost to continue to keep the videos fresh.”Keefe says the site will maintain about 250 clips at all times, with 180 original videos produced annually. Instructional pieces will make up the majority of the content, though topical features and interviews will also be included.That instructional, “how-to” audience is a segment Keefe wants to capitalize on. From enthusiasts like MR to consumer publications like Motor Trend or This Old House or Everyday Food, video is proving popular with hobbyists.”[There’s] evidence elsewhere that companies seem to be having success in doing this with other hobbies,” Keefe says. “Things like cooking, gardening or woodworking. There’s not a lot of it yet, but there are signs that in certain hobbies, with certain levels of devotion, you can do this.”——To stay updated on the latest FOLIO: news, become a Facebook fan and follow us on Twitter! Hobby titles are proving to be fertile ground for video.Kalmbach Publishing’s Model Railroader is the latest to expand its offerings, launching a paid video subscription site to its compliment the 79-year-old brand.The site, Model Railroader Video Plus, will feature three or four new clips per week, produced by a dedicated two-man MR video team in collaboration with the magazine’s staff and select outside contributors.”There’s a natural affinity for video that a hobby like model railroading has,” says Kevin Keefe, vice president of editorial for Kalmbach. “Evidence across all our titles [suggested] that our customers are looking for more video, and in the case of Model Railroader, we saw the growth in video views on our magazine’s standard websites and it was a big number for us.”last_img read more

Lila Downs Announces New Album Paying Tribute To The Chile Pepper Releases

first_img Lila Downs Announces New Album Paying Tribute To The Chile Pepper, Releases Tour Info Facebook Twitter News Lila Downs Announces New Album, Tour lila-downs-announces-new-album-paying-tribute-chile-pepper-releases-tour-info Email The announcement was made with the release of the first single, a cover of the Peruvian cumbia classic “Cariñito”Jennifer VelezGRAMMYs Apr 10, 2019 – 5:42 pm GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Lila Downs, known for her eclectic mixture sounds from Mexico and beyond, has announced that her latest album, Al Chile, will pay tribute to the chile pepper and will drop May 3. The news came with the release of the first single, “Cariñito.”Al Chile, produced by the GRAMMY-nominated DJ and producer Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound) and mixed by Mario Caldato Jr., who has worked with the Beastie Boys and Jack Johnson, is not a joke; it sincerely shows love for the fruit. “Yes, the music is a tribute to the fruit that causes us so much craving and suffering, but that we really love!” Downs said in a statement. “We fry the chile, add beats from the city, then saxophones, trumpets and drums from the Mexican coast to keep the dance going. The village and the city are united by the same beat. With a mezcal in hand, we dream of a place with a palm tree where one falls in love and reflects.”The first single is Down’s take on a Peruvian cumbia classic. The singer also released dates for the album’s supporting tour that will take her to Los Angeles’ Walt Disney Concert Hall, New York City, Seattle and other cities across the U.S.For more information on the tour, visit Downs’ website. Closing The Gap: How Latina Artists Are Combating Gender Inequality In Urban MusicRead morelast_img read more

FCA leans on Harman and Google for new connectedcar services

first_img 2019 Maserati Levante GTS: Heart of gold 2019 Dodge Durango SRT: A big utility with big performance More From Roadshow More about 2019 Dodge Durango SRT AWD Review • 2019 Dodge Durango SRT review: Three-row muscle car Preview • 2019 Dodge Durango: Model overview, pricing, tech and specs 2020 Volvo V60 Cross Country first drive: Small changes make a big impact null 73 Photoscenter_img Tags Share your voice Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Google Auto Tech Future Cars 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid: First hybrid minivan wins on fuel economy 0 In the US, it’s been generally acknowledged that Fiat Chrysler has kept its focus on the older-school elements of the auto industry while others have gone all-in on things like electrification and connectivity. But now, its Uconnect telematics are set to receive a big boost to help adapt to the future of in-car services.Fiat Chrysler announced on Tuesday that it will rely on tech from Harman and Google to build out its connected-car services. This “ecosystem,” as FCA refers to it, is set to launch in the second half of 2019, and it’ll be part of all new FCA vehicles around the world by 2022.Harman’s Ignite cloud platform will serve as the base for the out-of-car side of FCA’s services. With 4G connectivity and tech that fosters “the evolution to 5G,” FCA says its cloud services will work with any service provider worldwide. It’ll cover all the normal stuff that other automakers have in their connected-car portfolios, like fuel and charging station locations, predictive maintenance and over-the-air updates. It should also be capable of working with vehicle-to-infrastructure communication.Enlarge ImageHere’s a quick look at the major things FCA wants its new system to deliver. Yes, it’s a lot. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Google comes into play inside the car. The next version of its Uconnect infotainment system will run on Android, further bridging the connection between phone and in-car telematics. While this might conjure memories of Volvo’s announcement that it will use Android OS in the upcoming Polestar 2, there’s one key difference. Whereas Volvo’s foray with the operating system includes Google Maps, Google Assistant and other apps and services, FCA’s system won’t have any of those ancillary bits, just the operating system.FCA was quick to note that these new foundations will allow for a number of services specific to electrified vehicles, too — an area where, at least in the US, FCA lags behind its competitors. These platforms will enable remote battery management, EV navigation that keeps range in mind and services that help the vehicle work better with the electrical grid.There’s even more than that in store. FCA has its sights set on alternate mobility methods, too — its system is capable of working with usage-based insurance, varying-term vehicle rentals and even peer-to-peer car sharing. The automaker didn’t say which parts would start rolling out first, but as we push into the next decade (just a few months away!), we’ll get a better idea of what FCA has in store.Originally published April 30, 8:08 a.m. PT.Update, 5:32 p.m.: Clarified differences between Volvo and FCA operating systems.last_img read more

Abhinandan could start flying fighter jets soon Bengalurubased group to take final

first_imgIAF Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman will return to the cockpit and resume flying soon.Indian Air Force braveheart Abhinandan Varthaman, who was captured by Pakistan last month and returned to India two days later, could once again fly fighter jets after he is given final clearance by the Bengaluru-based Institute of Aerospace Medicine (IAM). As per reports, there’s a fine chance that the 35-year-old IAF hero will return to the cockpit and resume flying soon.As per laws governing the Indian troopers, any serving officer who has recently returned from enemy captivity has to undergo a series of tests. It is believed that Abhinandan, too, will have to undergo all kinds of training all over again before he can take to the skies again.Abhinandan joins his squadronIAF Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman has gone back to his squadron in Srinagar though he is on sick leave for four weeks. The IAF pilot preferred to stay with his squadron in Srinagar than spending time with his family in Chennai while on leave. Varthaman was on leave for few days after the security agencies completed a nearly two-week debriefing after his return from the nuclear-armed neighbour Pakistan.The IAF Wing Commander returned home on March 1 after his MiG 21 Bison crashed during a dogfight with Pakistan. Upon ejecting out of his crashed aircraft, Abhinandan landed at Horan village in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. Over 50 hours later, the IAF pilot finally returned to the Indian soil.After Abhinandan was released by Pakistan, defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman met him at a military hospital in New Delhi.In a nutshellTensions between India and Pakistan escalated after Indian fighters bombed terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed’s biggest training camp near Balakot sector, deep inside the Pakistani soil on February 26. Pakistan retaliated by attempting to target the Indian personnel the very next day. However, the IAF thwarted their plans.The Indian strike on the Jaish-e-Mohammed camp came two weeks after the terror group claimed responsibility for a suicide attack on a CRPF convoy in Kashmir, killing 40 troopers. Indian Air Force pilot Abhinandan Varthaman held his head high and crossed over to the Indian side Closecenter_img IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:03/0:55Loaded: 0%0:03Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-0:52?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …last_img read more

Durex launches campaign for safe sex emoticon

first_imgClose Condom maker Durex says it is calling for the creation of a safe sex emoji and presenting an official submission to emoticon maker Unicode on 1 December, which is World Aids Day.In the run-up to the day, used to unite people around the world in the fight against HIV and Aids, Durex launched a social media campaign to create the first official safe sex emoji, asking users to use #CondomEmoji.In an age of smartphones and tablets, emoticons, the small icons which can express emotions or physical things, were crucial to how young couples communicate, Durex said.Citing its own research, the company said in a statement some 80% of 16 to 25-year-olds find it easier to express themselves with emojis. Meanwhile, 84% felt more comfortable using icons when talking about sex.last_img

BCL men rough up college principal

first_imgA group of unruly students identifying themselves as members of Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) allegedly beat up the principal of Alokdia Amaresh Basu College in Sadar upazila on Sunday.The attakers also ransacked the office of the principal demanding a large sum of money.On information, the police rushed to the spot and “brought the situation under control”, said additional police superintendent of Magura Tariqul Islam.When contacted, Mostafa Faruq, principal of the college, alleged that some students identifying themselves as BCL men had been threatening him for the past few days demanding a good amount of money.”They launched the pre-planed attack as I did not meet their demand”, he said.Meanwhile, some students of the college said that the managing committee of the college along with its principal took Tk 70,00,000 from seven candidates over fresh teachers appointment in 2014 while no one is appointed till now.The authorities also did not return their money yet, the students also alleged.”There is a dispute between two groups over internal matters of the college,” said the police official Tariqul Islam. He, however, did not clarify about the disputed matter.last_img read more

Tariqul Islam buried in Jashore

first_imgTariqul IslamBNP standing committee member and former minister Tariqul Islam was buried at Karbala graveyard in Jashore around 4:45pm on Monday, reports UNB.His fourth and final namaz-e-janaza was held at Jashore Eidgah after Asr prayers.People from all walks of life, leaders of the ruling and opposition parties, Tariqul’s family members and relatives attended the namaz-e-janaza.Tariqul, who had long been suffering from heart and kidney diseases, diabetics and old-age complications, died at Apollo Hospitals Dhaka in the capital on Sunday at the age of 73.His body was flown to Jashore airport from Dhaka around 2:35pm and then taken to his residence in the town.Later, it was brought to the Town Hall field where people from all walks of life gathered to have a last glimpse of the late leader. They also paid their last homage to Tariqul and bade him the final farewell.From the Town Hall, the body was taken to Eidgah for his final janaza.BNP standing committee member Abdul Moyeen Khan and party vice chairman Netai Roy Chowdhury, on behalf of party chairperson Khaleda Zia, paid tributes to Tariqul by placing wreaths at his coffin.Local MPs, leaders of Awami League and other parties also paid respects to him by placing wreaths at his coffin. Later, the janaza was held around 4:30pm.The BNP leader’s first namaz-e-janaza was held at a Shantinagar mosque on Sunday night, while the second one at Naya Paltan in front of BNP’s central office around 10am and the third one at the South Plaza of Jatiya Sangsad Bhaban in the capital around 11:15am on Monday.BNP, led by party senior leaders, paid last respects to him by placing wreaths at his coffin in front of its central office.The party also observed a mourning day on Monday by hoisting black flags and keeping the party flag at half-mast atop its offices across the country. The party leaders and activists also wore black badges.Tariqul had long been inactive in party politics due to his illness. He last attended a BNP standing committee members’ meeting in February this year before Khaleda was sent to jail in the Zia Orphanage Trust graft case.He was elected MP for four times from Jashore and performed as information and environment and forest minister during the BNP-led four-party government.When BNP formed the government in 1991, Tariqul was first made social welfare minister and then posts and telecommunications minister.Born in Jashore in November 1946, Tariqul was the first elected chairman of Jashore municipality.last_img read more

Poll Finds Many Harvey Victims Saying They Still Need Help

first_imgDavid J. Phillip/APHurricane Harvey dropped record rainfall on Houston neighborhoods like this one, near Addicks Reservoir.More than three months after Hurricane Harvey walloped Texas, many affected residents say they’re still not getting help they need and President Donald Trump is getting low marks for his handling of the disaster, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation/Episcopal Health Foundation survey released Tuesday.The poll is another indication of how families along the Texas coast continue struggling in wake of the Category 4 storm, which left Houston underwater and killed more than 80 people.Nearly half of residents who said they had property damage or lost their job or work hours because of Harvey say they’re not getting the resources needed to get back on their feet. Federal officials have approved $1.4 billion in Harvey assistance to individuals and households but the survey showed signs of confusion and frustration: More than 6 in 10 denied applicants say they received no information on how to try again.MORE: Houston Matters Discusses Harvey Survey With Elena Marks of Episcopal HealthTrump, who has consistently low approval ratings nationally, also received worse numbers than Congress or Texas leaders for their response to Harvey, with half saying the president was doing a fair or poor job.Fears over immigration enforcement may also have a chilling effect on asking for help: Of those surveyed who were likely to be in the U.S. illegally, a majority were either very or somewhat worried about drawing attention to their status if they reached out for help.“It’s a really mixed picture for a lot of people. We do see people saying their lives are back to normal,” said Liz Hamel, the director of public opinion and survey research for Kaiser. But she added, “The people who are having more trouble recovering are the ones who started out in a more tenuous position.”African-American residents and those living well below the federal poverty level were most likely to say they needed more help. Applying for disaster assistance and repairing damaged homes were the biggest concerns to those needing help, followed by finding affordable housing and getting medical care.About 4 in 10 were also not confident about Harvey relief dollars trickling down to those who need it most.More than 892,000 have applied for aid with the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the aftermath of Harvey slamming the Texas coast on Aug. 25. About one-third of those applicants were deemed ineligible, and FEMA spokesman Robert Howard said every person who is denied aid receives a letter stating the reason and information on the appeals process.The White House last month sent Congress a $44 billion disaster aid package that was criticized by lawmakers as being too small. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, called it “wholly inadequate” while White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said Texas should “step up” and provide more state money to rebuilding efforts.The survey of 1,635 adults was conducted by phone Oct. 17-Nov. 20 using a random sample of residents that suffered large amounts of property damage from Harvey, according to FEMA reports. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.0 percentage points. Sharelast_img read more

The Virtues Just for Today Mytho Take Top Honors at Series Mania

first_imgBEST ACTRESSCarole Weyers (“Super Jimmy”)BEST ACTORGregory Montel (“Family Shake”)INTERNATIONAL PANORAMABEST SERIES“Exit” (Petter Testmann-Koch, Øystein Karlsen, Norway)SHORT FORMS COMPETITIONBEST SERIES “People Talking,” (Alvaro Carmona, Spain)ALL-NIGHT COMEDY MARATHONBEST COMEDY“M’entends-tu”? (Florence Longpré, Canada) “Marina Hands’ delicate, compassionate performance commands every frame of ‘Mytho.’ Funny, genuine and sly, she makes the show an undeniable delight,” the jury declared.Of other prizes, Arte France scored once more with “Apnea,” produced by Image et Compagnie, sold by Lagardere Studios Distribution, and acquired by Amazon Prime Video for France.A reworking of the mermaid myth, cast in a murder mystery set in a quaint fishing village on a Mediterranean isle, and starring Laetitia Casta and Noée Abita, “Apnea” won best picture in French Competition. France 2’s “Super Jimmy,” a buddy cop comedy, won Carole Weyers (“Manhattan”) best actress; Gregory Montel scooped actor for M6’s “Family Shake,” about the tribulations of a second-marriage couple.Doing thing to damage the idea that some of the best scripted series in Scandinavia are now coming out ofNorway, produced by Fremantle Norway, NRK’s “Exit,” an acid tragicomic depiction of Norway’s financial elite, won best series in a highly competitive international panorama, featuring series such as Yes Studios’ “Asylum City” and Sky Deutschland’s “Eight Days.”Series Mania’s Short Forms competition was won by “People Talking,” from Spain’s Atresmedia, described by its jury, as “a bold and modern concept, perfectly suited to the short format. ‘Black Mirror’ but on the tender side. A series that goes so far in so little time. Funny, sincere and incredibly deep.”2019 SERIES MANIA WINNERS:INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIONGRAND PRIX“The Virtues,” (Shane Meadows, Jack Thorne, U.K.)Special Jury Prize“Just for Today” (Nir Bergman, Ram Nehari, Israel)BEST ACTRESSMARINA HANDS (“MYTHO,” FRANCE)BEST ACTORStephen Graham (“The Virtues”)AUDIENCE AWARD“Mytho,” (Anne Berest, Fabrice Gobert, France)FRENCH COMPETITIONBEST SERIES“Apnea,” (Gaia Guasto, Aurélien Molas, Simon Moutaïrou, Marcia Romano) Uma Thurman: ‘It Is Always About Dancing or Fighting for Your Life’ Series Mania: 10 Takeaways – Netflix, Buzz Titles, Deals, Retaining Rights Benefitting hugely from Meadows’ sustained use of 5-10 camera set-ups, which allowed him to “capture that one magical moment in time,” as he told Variety, and also choose what angle to portray it from, “The Virtues” is written with Jack Thorne, produced by Warp Films, airs shortly on the U.K.’s Channel 4 and is part of ITV Studios Global Ent.’s spring drama slate.Co-created and directed by Bergman, the co-creator of “In Therapy,” adapted in the U.S as “In Treatment,” “Just for Today” won Series Mania’s Special Jury Prize.Produced by Endemol Shine Israel for Yes TV, and sold internationally by Yes Studios, “Just for Today” adds a social edge to Bergman’s work, delivering a severe critique of Israel’s parole system, detailing the life, after exhaustive research, at a South Tel Aviv ex-cons’ rehabilitation center.A psychological drama asking how much people can change their lives, Bergman told Variety, it explores this on a parallel romantic level in its story of the hostel’s director who’s been paying emotional penance for years after shopping a ward, a Russian immigrant and the love of her life. Suddenly, once more out of jail, he appears at the hostel.“Suspenseful, touching and full of heart, Just for Today is a beautifully realized portrait of newly released prisoners and the social workers assigned to help them adjust to life on the outside,” Series Mania’s International Competition jury said in a statement. .Commissioned by French-German broadcaster Arte, sold by Federation Entertainment and to be released outside France and Germany by Netflix, the idiosyncratic drama-comedy “Mytho” proved a breakout audience hit at Series Mania. Produced by Unité de Production (“Razzia,” “The Churchmen,”), written by Anne Berest (“Paris Etc.”) and directed by Gobert, creator of “Les Revenants,” “Mytho” won Series Mania’s Audience Award and best actress plaudit for Marina Hands (“Tell No One,” “Lady Chatterly”) who, ignored by hubby and offspring, announces she has cancer. The family’s life will never be the same. “From the first frame, ‘The Virtues’ moves you with its deep humanity. Masterfully directed, written and acted, the show is a prime example of the power of series television to illuminate and create empathy,” the International Competition jury, led by screenwriter-producer Marti Noxon, said in a statement, adding that Graham’s performance “is simply stunning. His powerfully raw portrayal of a man coming to grips with his past and himself is truly heart-breaking.” Related Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Three series from strong creative voices – Shane Meadows’ “The Virtues,” Nir Bergman’s “Just for Today” and the Fabrice Gobert-directed, and Netflix-backed, “Mytho” – shared  major honors at an enlarged, hectic 10th Series Mania, now firmly established in festival, industry and discussion forum terms as one of the major TV events in Europe.A story of redemption, unexpected love and imperfect fatherhood – a growing trend among drama series, Eurodata TV’s Avril Blondelot said at Series Mania – “The Virtues” won the Series Mania Grand Prix and best actor for Stephen Graham, a standout in Meadows’ “This is England,” who puts in profoundly affecting performance, by common consensus, as Joseph, a man who travels to Ireland to confront the demons left by a childhood in its care-system.last_img read more

Scientists Build AntiMosquito Laser

first_img Citation: Scientists Build Anti-Mosquito Laser (2009, March 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-scientists-anti-mosquito-laser.html Explore further The anti-mosquito laser was originally introduced by astrophysicist Lowell Wood in the early 1980s, but the idea never took off. More recently, former Microsoft executive Nathan Myhrvold revived the laser idea when Bill Gates asked him to explore new ways of combating malaria. Now, astrophysicist Jordin Kare from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Wood, Myhrvold, and other experts have developed a handheld laser that can locate individual mosquitoes and kill them one by one. The developers hope that the technology might be used to create a laser barrier around a house or village that could kill or blind the insects. Alternatively, flying drones equipped with anti-mosquito lasers could track the insects with radar and then sweep the sky with the laser.The researchers are tuning the strength of the laser so that it kills mosquitoes without harming other insects or, especially, people. The system can even distinguish between males and females by the frequency of their wing movements, which may be important since only females spread the parasite. In experiments, the system could target mosquitoes with a flashlight, and then uses a zoom lens to feed the data to the computer, which fires at the insect. Each time the laser strikes a mosquito, the computer makes a gunshot sound. When the mosquito is hit, it bursts into flame and falls to the ground, and a thin plume of smoke rises. The anti-mosquito laser is just one of many novel ways to kill the disease-carrying insects, in addition to the conventional strategy of vaccinating humans. Other ideas include devices that disrupt the mosquitoes’ senses of sight, smell, and heat; feeding them poisoned blood; infecting them with a genetically altered bacterium; and creating a malaria-free mutant to overtake the natural mosquitoes.via: Wall Street Journal© 2009 PhysOrg.com A laser that kills mosquitoes could help reduce the spread of malaria. Image credit: PlaneMad/Wikipedia Protein plays key role in transmitting deadly malaria parasite (PhysOrg.com) — In an effort to prevent the spread of malaria, scientists have built a laser that shoots and kills mosquitoes. Malaria, which is caused by a parasite and transmitted by mosquitoes, kills about 1 million people every year. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Suffered acne You may show fewer signs of ageing

first_imgSuffering from those itchy red pimples? Take heart, as your skin may age more slowly than those with no history of acne, a study has found. Signs of ageing such as wrinkles and skin thinning often appear much later in people who have experienced acne in their lifetime. It has been suggested that this is due to increased oil production but there are likely to be other factors involved, the study said. The findings revealed that people who have previously suffered from acne are likely to have longer telomeres in their white blood cells, meaning that their cells could be better protected against ageing. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfTelomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found at the end of chromosomes, which protect them from deteriorating during the process of replication.  The telomeres gradually break down and shrink as cells age, eventually leading to cell death, which is a normal part of human growth and ageing. “Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres which appears to be different in acne sufferers and means their cells may be protected against ageing,” said lead author Simone Ribero, a dermatologist at King’s College London.  Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive“For many years dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime. Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear,” Ribero said.In the study the team measured the length of white blood cell telomeres in 1,205 twins. A quarter of the twins reported having experienced acne in their lifetime.Statistical analyses which adjusted for age, relatedness, weight and height showed that telomere length in acne sufferers was significantly longer, meaning that white blood cells were more protected from the usual deterioration with age. The researchers also examined gene expression in pre-existing skin biopsies from the same twins to identify possible gene pathways linked to acne.last_img read more

We are living through a moment of madness that fut

first_imgWe are living through a moment of madness that future historians will write about: Black is white, down is up, rehypothecation is prudence, naked shorting is benevolent, abuse is love, theft is mercy. And all the while, humanity just sits and accepts their abuse. Following is courage, thinking is threat, and no one dares a sideways glance at the insanity, for fear that it will break. It’s sick; it’s evil; it’s disgusting; but for now it is also true. To quote a scientist from the early 1980s, upon seeing a photo of braided rings around Saturn: “It’s stark, raving mad, but it’s there.” This is the ultimate, screaming triumph of the political and banking elite – their highest high in the history of civilization. And yet, no matter how badly they abuse the world, they enjoy complete obedience. All cling to a system that grinds them up and all walk together into the sea as they are told, singing hymns to governments and central banks as they go. Either something breaks, or humanity tires of this insanity, or it continues until all the world is North Korea, worshiping photos of a vile little man, never lifting their eyes and thanking the vile little man for the deaths of themselves and their children. And the rest of the world is allowing it. You’d think that the Russians or the Chinese, at least, would make some self-interested moves, but they don’t. The entire “first world” financial system is manipulated. This is no secret – the manipulators not only admit it, but are proud of it. And yes, I am referring to central banks: manipulation is what they do. I really don’t have any inside information on this, except that I’ve heard a lot of confidential stories from Comex traders. (Don’t trust Comex for a second.) So, manipulation is a given. What I’m referring to is the fact that the manipulators are succeeding beyond anyone’s wildest dreams. Joe Average knows in his gut that everything is smoke and mirrors, but he is unwilling to look. He prays that the manipulators can keep the game going until he is dead, when he can no longer be held accountable. The success of the manipulators has reached such levels that their victims are unwilling to complain. In fact, their victims defend them! It’s a type of Stockholm Syndrome, spread over continents. I got an email two days ago, from a friend who happens to be one of the world’s great investment analysts. He was at wit’s end over the markets. Not because of price moves – his charts predicted those – but because people no longer cared about reality. Here’s what I wrote back to my friend: They are winning. There is no question about it. They are printing like mad with minimal inflation, stealing from millions at once with no riots, stoking raging bull markets based on no reason whatsoever, creating paper silver and gold without limit and without consequences, while keeping all the foreigners in line and obedient. And if something does ever break, they’ll need a war – a big, nasty war – the kind that really scares people – not tanks rolling through a desert. That’s the world as it stands today. Perhaps everything will change tomorrow, but for now, the manipulators are at peak success. “The madness of crowds” is here. If, somewhere, there is a successor to Charles Mackay (who wrote the classic book of that title), he must be a very busy boy. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

first_img— – Goldsmith: Why I Work For Doug Casey Now—Eye-Opening Report from Former Stansberry DirectorSean Goldsmith recently left Stansberry to work alongside one of the most influential economists in the world today, Doug Casey. Goldsmith explains the full details here. Get Ready:This Wednesday at 8 pm, Porter Stansberry, founder of Stansberry Research, will host an exclusive live webinar called: “How to Profit from the Greatest Transfer of Wealth in History.” You won’t want to miss this… click here to reserve your seat. Critical Warning to Anyone Who Was Born Before 1969We just got exclusive information obtained from an “invitation-only” meeting in Washington, D.C. Some of the most powerful people in finance gathered behind closed doors to discuss a secret deal… one that could have a major impact on your finances, especially if you were born before 1969. If you’re a senior and rely on the government for income, you’ll be badly hurt if this deal gets inked. Click here to see the details. – Recommended Links Doug: Scandinavia is on a slippery slope. I wouldn’t be surprised if a very nasty “black swan” the size of a pterodactyl landed there. The U.S. isn’t far behind. Big Brother is coming out of the cellar, where he’s been chained up, in the U.S. And I’m afraid he’s so strong and nasty that few people will be able to pay him enough to leave them alone.There have long been local pockets of notorious corruption in the U.S., of course; building inspectors, people like that. On a national level, the DEA became very corrupt early on, a natural consequence of “regulating” an industry that runs on billions in cash.Other federal agencies are more subtly corrupt. Generals are paid off by being hired by defense contractors after they’re mustered out. FDA types are hired by the drug companies and large agribusinesses, and executives from those companies become high-level bureaucrats in the FDA. Politicians rarely take envelopes of cash anymore. They wait until they are out of office to collect millions in directors’ fees, book deals, speaking tours, stock deals, and the like. Bill Clinton is a perfect example of someone who went from near penniless to a net worth of $50 million-plus overnight. The Clintons have made a huge leap from the days when Hillary had to take a $100,000 payoff in the guise of her totally transparent cattle-trading scheme.The problem now, though, is that there are giant police bureaucracies like the TSA and the FBI that have no direct way of getting paid off. So they enforce the idiotic laws like robots. Other bureaucracies like NSA do their damage remotely, too far from the victim to be negotiated with. This is a real source of danger.Doug Casey is a multi-millionaire speculator and the founder of Casey Research. He literally wrote the book on profiting during economic turmoil. Doug’s book, Crisis Investing, spent multiple weeks as number one on the New York Times bestsellers list and was the best-selling financial book of 1980. Doug has been a regular guest on national television, including spots on CNN, Merv Griffin, Charlie Rose, Regis Philbin, Phil Donahue, and NBC News.Doug and his team of analysts write The Casey Report, one of the world’s most respected investment advisories. Each month, The Casey Report provides specific, actionable ideas to help subscribers make money in stocks, bonds, currencies, real estate, and commodities. You can try out The Casey Report risk-free by clicking here. L: It’s interesting: These countries where a high degree of legal regulation seems to work are also highly homogeneous and have very powerful cultures; makes you wonder if the laws are really doing anything at all, or if they are just window dressing on more powerful social systems.It makes me think of the many experimental societies tried out in the 19th century in the U.S., when there were still open frontiers to which one could escape with like-minded people and try to do things differently. Most were communes. And most were disasters. Some worked, and a few even still exist in vestigial form today, like the Amana colonies. Those that worked best were religious communes. Just goes to show that if you can go beyond homogeneity and get unanimity, you can create a society that seems to defy all experience to the contrary. When everyone buys in, amazing things can happen…at least for a while.Doug: Almost anything can work for a while. Some monasteries approach an almost perfect state of communism. It’s possible because everyone there chooses to be there and live according to those rules. Unanimous consent. But that’s not possible in an entire country, and even the super-majority buy-in of highly homogeneous cultures like New Zealand and Scandinavia is not possible in 98% of the rest of the countries in the world. If you look at the rest of the world, the more socialistic and regulated the country, the more corrupt it tends to be. And the larger the country, the more disparate the population and divergent the mores, the less effective the government’s regulation.L: That would cover China, Russia…Brazil, Mexico.Doug: And Argentina, where I am now. The customs inspectors down here, for example, all expect to retire as multimillionaires. That’s because they have so many laws on what you can export or import…how, when, and why, it’s almost impossible to comply with, or even know, all the laws. It’s much cheaper and easier to get the inspector to look the other way with a well-placed envelope.There’s good news and bad news in this.In itself, corruption is a bad thing; it shouldn’t have to be necessary. As I touched on earlier, insofar as it’s necessary, it’s also a good thing. If we can’t eliminate the laws that give rise to corruption, it’s a good thing that it’s possible to circumvent these laws. The worst of all situations is to have a mass of strict, stultifying, economically suicidal laws…and also have strict, effective enforcement of those laws. If a culture doesn’t allow people to work around stupid laws, that culture’s doom is further sealed with every stupid law passed, which is pretty much all of them.L: Strict laws, strictly enforced, is a recipe for paralysis. I’ve often said that while Mexico is much less free than the U.S. on paper, it is much more free in fact. People in the U.S. fear their government, especially the IRS. In Mexico, people build what they want, eat what they want, sell what they want; tax evasion is the national pastime.Doug: Right. This is one of the reasons why, though I’ve lived in New Zealand quite a bit over the last 10 years, I’m not really interested in hanging my spurs there any longer. Although it’s gotten vastly better since the reforms of the mid-’80s, it’s still a dull, insular place with a lot of ingrained socialist attitudes, but not much corruption to help you obviate them. And I wouldn’t want to live in the Scandinavian countries either.They have all these incredibly stupid laws that sheep-like residents obey, enabling great tyranny, but it goes unrecognized because it has such popular support. It suits me much better to live in a place like Argentina, where there’s an equal number of stupid laws, but nobody pays any attention to them. And when there is a problem, it can most often be handled, informally.L: I won’t ask you on the record if you’ve ever actually done that. Interesting comment about Scandinavia: I was just reading Google News yesterday, and one of the top video news stories was a clip about some poor woman in Sweden who’s had her twin daughters taken away by the child protection busybodies. The children were taken, without notice, from their school, and the woman didn’t even know it was an official abduction until she got a letter a week later. The real horror of it is that there isn’t actually any evidence of wrongdoing on the woman’s part. The law is preemptive and protective; the bureaucrats are authorized to remove children from their families if there might be danger to them. No due process, and forget about “innocent until proven guilty.” The breathtaking assumption is that it’s better to rip children out of their families than to find out if there’s a real problem first. This could only hold sway in a place where the culture is one of great confidence in the wisdom and benevolence of the state. “They’ll do everything they can to push the price of gold down.”This statement was made by keynote speaker and trend forecaster Gerald Celente at the 2015 Casey Research Summit. Find out what Mr. Celente has to say about gold manipulation…the Federal Reserve’s hidden scheme…and how you can protect yourself from it right here. (Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator)This interview was first published on February 9, 2011Editor’s Note: In yesterday’s Weekend Edition, Casey Research founder Doug Casey explained why laws and regulations can’t stop corruption. Today, Doug explains why corruption in government can actually be a good thing….Louis James: I think the point of government-sponsored irresponsibility is particularly important, and often overlooked.I’ve long thought that it was FDR’s New Deal that really pushed America over the edge, not so much because of the economic cost, but because it made it very clear to people that they did not need to be responsible for themselves. Big Brother now takes care of them when they get old, or should they fall ill, or lose a job; no need to plan ahead or save… It’s no wonder our culture has transformed from one of individualism and self-reliance to one of groupthink and reliance on the state, populated by entitlement-minded couch potatoes.But what do you say to people who point to places like Sweden, a highly government-regulated society that seems to work? Such a nice, clean place, with lots of government.Doug: It’s a good point. Sweden is at the low end of the corruption scale, but it’s not because they have laws against corruption; everybody has those. It’s because of the culture; the peer pressure, moral opprobrium, and social approbation I mentioned earlier. Sweden is a small country where word of misdeeds spreads quickly. It has a highly homogeneous culture based on deep-rooted traditions, and there’s a high degree of consensus about how things should be. That makes Swedes cooperate with the large body of law that reflects that consensus, much more than would happen almost anywhere else, or is even possible anywhere else.Out of a couple hundred countries in the world outside of Scandinavia, I can think of two other places that have a similarly powerful culture that makes a “big-government” approach to managing society seem to work: New Zealand and Uruguay. These places are small, relatively isolated, homogeneous, and with powerful cultural traditions that have, unfortunately, been codified into law. These countries, coincidentally, also have the three oldest socialist governments in the world, all dating back to the turn of the 20th century. Trying to bribe officials in these places, even Uruguay, is pretty much out of the question.But these places are anomalous. Because of their rare characteristics, they can’t be held up as role models for other places. Almost everywhere else, where there’s more diversity of ethnicity, culture, much larger population, and so forth, Scandinavian socialism wouldn’t even have the appearance of working. And, I’d argue, it won’t work much longer in Scandinavia either; Sweden and these other places will ultimately collapse under the weight of their mass of laws and socialist intervention in their economies. Recommended Links —last_img read more

It was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 am

first_imgIt was Bea Duncan who answered the phone at 2 a.m. on a January morning. Her son Jeff had been caught using drugs in a New Hampshire sober home and was being kicked out.Bea and her husband, Doug Duncan, drove north that night nine years ago to pick Jeff up. On the ride back home, to Natick, Mass., the parents delivered an ultimatum: Their son had to go back to rehab, or leave home.Jeff chose the latter, Bea says. She remembers a lot of yelling, cursing and tears as they stopped the car, in the dead of night, a few miles from the house.”It was really, really difficult to actually just drop him off in a parking lot on our way home and say, ‘you made the decision — no rehab — so we made the decision, no home,’ ” Bea says. “It was exquisitely difficult.”Doug Duncan says many parents had told him to expect this moment. He remembers them saying their son would have to “hit rock bottom; you’re going to have to kick him out of the house.”Two torturous days later, Jeff Duncan came home. Although he returned to rehab, the Duncans decided their approach wasn’t working. They sought help, eventually connecting with a program that, instead of tough love, stresses empathy: CRAFT or Community Reinforcement and Family Training.”There was more compassion and, ‘Wow, this is really difficult for you’; more open questions to him instead of dictating what he should and should not behave like,” says Bea. Many drug users say, in hindsight, they’ve appreciated being forced into treatment. But studies show that a compassionate approach and voluntary treatment are the more effective ways to engage drug users in recovery and keep them alive. That’s a critical consideration for families in this era of fentanyl, a powerful opioid that can shut down breathing in seconds.”The concept of letting their children hit bottom is not the best strategy,” says Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Because in hitting bottom they may die.”After they went through CRAFT training, the Duncans say things started to shift from chaos to calm.”I started to feel an immense sense of relief,” Bea says. “I stopped feeling like I had to be a private investigator and controlling mom. I could kind of walk side-by-side with him on this journey, instead of feeling like I had to take charge of it.”For the Duncans, the approach meant they could switch from enforcing family consequences, like kicking Jeff out of the house, to supporting him as he faced other challenges, like losing a job because of his drug use.It worked well: Bea and Doug helped Jeff stick to his recovery. He’s 28 now and has been sober for nine years.But desperate parents often don’t know how to avoid “hitting bottom” with their children, as the Duncans did on that dark and frigid January morning. The Duncans have found ways to help others: Doug is a parent coach through the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, which is now collaborating with the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center.The collaboration will close a gap in services for families caught up in the opioid epidemic, says Grayken Center’s director, Michael Botticelli, who served as drug czar in the Obama administration.”They don’t call this a family disease for no good reason,” Botticelli says. “The whole design of these services [is] to promote tools and information for families, so they know how to approach a situation and can heal.”There is no uniform path to healing for the drug user or parents, and no widespread agreement on the best approach for families.Joanne Peterson, who founded the parent support network Learn to Cope, says there are reasons why some parents ask older children to leave the house — if there are younger children at home or if the parents don’t feel safe.”So it depends on what ‘tough love’ means; it can mean many different things,” Peterson says.She applauds the Grayken Center for expanding access to parent coaches, but “we also need more professional help.” Peterson says she routinely hears from parents who can’t find counselors and doctors who understand their daily traumas.Some critics suggest the CRAFT model is too soft, that it enables drug use.”That’s a misconception,” says Fred Muench, president of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “CRAFT is authoritative parenting, creating a sense of responsibility in the child, and at the same time saying, ‘I am here for you; I love you; I’m going to help you; but I can’t help you avoid negative consequences if you’re not looking to do that on your own.’ “The parent coaching extends beyond periods of crisis.On a recent afternoon, Doug Duncan was on the phone with Doreen, a mom whose daughter is in recovery. (We’re using only Doreen’s first name to protect her daughter’s privacy.) Doreen was upset about an angry text from her daughter that sounded like the messages the young woman sent when she was using drugs.”It brings me back there. In two seconds, I am back on that scene thinking she’s on the heroin, she’s not going to live,” Doreen told Duncan, expressing a very common fear of a loved one’s relapse.In a panic — her daughter had overdosed twice and been rescued — Doreen wanted to ask if she was using heroin again. But she ran it by Duncan first. He encouraged her to talk it through.Doreen paused, then said she could ask her daughter about work — whether it’s been stressful — or about her grief after a friend’s recent death. There are many reasons, Doreen realized, that her daughter might be angry. Her tone didn’t have to signal a relapse.”You talk yourself off the cliff,” Duncan told her.”Oh yes, I know all about that cliff, I’ve visited a few times before,” Doreen said, and laughed. “You know, that ties in with what you said before about focusing less on what your feelings are, and the terror or fear that you’re going through, and more on what they’re feeling and what they’re going through — turn the tables a bit. That’s an excellent point.””That’s true compassion,” Duncan told her, “and oddly enough it’s very therapeutic for you, too.”More compassion in the home fits the shift away from criminalizing addiction — toward accepting and treating it as a chronic medical condition.If a child had cancer, parents “wouldn’t disengage with them or be angry with them,” says Botticelli. “So I do think it aligns our scientific understanding that addiction is a disease and not a moral failure.”This story is part of NPR’s partnership with NPR and Kaiser Health News. Copyright 2018 WBUR. To see more, visit WBUR.last_img read more

Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods

first_img This story originally appeared on PCMag Add to Queue Chinese Mall Introduces Husband Storage Pods Why drag someone around a mall when you can leave them happily playing games while you buy stuff? –shares China Enroll Now for $5 Matthew Humphries Image credit: via PC Magcenter_img 2 min read Visiting a mall can be a tiring and frustrating experience, especially if you really don’t like shopping. So one mall in China came up with a solution specifically targeted at all those husbands who accompany their wives but really don’t enjoy shopping.According to the BBC, they are called “husband storage” and take the form of a glass cubicle or pod. Inside you’ll find a comfortable chair and access to a range of video games from the ’90s. Initially use of the pods is free, but there’s plans to introduce a charge payable by smartphone to access and use them. According to Chinese website The Paper, the pods are popular, but also lacking in a few key areas. The biggest complaint so far is a lack of air conditioning, which means you are sitting in a glass cubicle sweating while playing.I think there’s also a missed opportunity here to sell users of the pods cold drinks and snacks. It wouldn’t be difficult to integrate a vending machine into the back or side of the pods, but it could result in greasy gaming pads.If the pods get really popular I can see banks of them being installed just like in internet cafes. Then they can be networked together to allow for multiplayer gaming. Before you know it we’ll have stories about people living out of them while playing online games all day.Social media in China is apparently split on whether the pods are a good idea or not. On the one hand it could encourage partners to go to the mall with their spouse, but on the other, what’s the point if all they are going to do is disappear inside a glass box? July 17, 2017 Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article Senior Editor Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful.last_img read more

Study highlights eczemarelated disparities in Hispanic and black children

first_img Source:University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine May 23 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)In a study that highlights racial disparities in the everyday impact of eczema, new research shows Hispanic and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to the chronic skin disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania examined more than a decade’s worth of data among children enrolled in a national eczema registry and found Hispanic children were most likely to have missed at least six days of school over six-month period due to their condition. Black children also saw higher probabilities of missed school days compared to white children. JAMA Dermatology published the findings today.Eczema, or atopic dermatitis (AD), is a common inflammatory disease that causes red and itchy skin. It affects about 30 million Americans in total, including up to 20 percent of children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. It is more common among black children and slightly more common in Hispanic children when compared with whites. In addition to the physical impact, eczema is associated with negative psychological effects, including an increased likelihood of anxiety and depression.“The effects of eczema are more than skin-deep, and studies have shown that the mental health and social impact of this condition can be significant – sometimes just as much or more than the physical – and may lead to a higher number of school days missed,” said the study’s lead author Joy Wan, MD, MSCE, a post-doctoral fellow and Instructor of Dermatology.Building on that previous research, this study specifically looked at eczema-related school absenteeism by race and ethnicity. Researchers used data on 8,015 patients enrolled in the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER) between November 2004 and July 2017. All patients were between the ages of 2 and 17 and had their AD diagnosed by a doctor. Overall, 241 of them (3.3 percent) missed six or more days of school over a six-month period, which meets the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of chronic school absenteeism. When adjusted for demographic and other variables, data showed Hispanic children were 3.4 times more likely to be chronically absent due to AD than white children. Black children were 1.5 times more likely.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenThe PEER data are self-reported, and the authors say the children included in PEER may not represent the general population with eczema. They say more research is needed to better understand the link. However, they point out this adds to a growing body of work that uncovers disparities related to eczema, including their recent study showing black and Hispanic children are more likely to go to an emergency room and black children are less likely to see a dermatologist for their eczema than white children. Most people don’t realize the serious impact eczema can have on a person’s life, and our research shows minorities may be disproportionately affected. We still have a lot to learn about eczema-related disparities but it’s becoming increasingly clear that these disparities need to be addressed.”Study’s senior author Junko Takeshita, MD, PhD, MSCE, an assistant professor of Dermatology and Epidemiologylast_img read more

Haryana bans 10yearold autorickshaws in Gurugram

first_img Next Indo-Asian News Service ChandigarhJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 21:58 IST Manohar Lal Khattar said secretary Regional Transport Authority and Gurugram Traffic Police would jointly prepare policy | File photo from REUTERSHIGHLIGHTSManohar Lal Khattar said if any 10-year-old auto-rickshaw found on road it will be impoundedOrders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over district grievance committee meetingThis policy would be prepared by Gurugram Police Commissioner Muhammad AkilHaryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Saturday announced that more than 10-year-old auto-rickshaws would not be allowed on roads in Gurugram, Haryana.”If such an auto-rickshaw is found plying on the roads it will be impounded,” Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar said.The orders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over the district grievance committee meeting in Gurugram.Manohar Lal Khattar said the Secretary Regional Transport Authority and the Gurugram Traffic Police would jointly prepare a policy for auto-rickshaws plying illegally without registration and carrying passengers more than the specified limit.This policy would be prepared by Gurugram Police Commissioner Muhammad Akil.Also Read | Man masturbates on woman inside Gurugram metro station, cops apologise for delay in actionAlso Read | Journalist sexually harasses domestic help in Gurugram, bookedAlso Watch | Gurugram man drags traffic cop on car’s bonnetFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byMohak Gupta Tags :Follow GurugramFollow GurgaonFollow HaryanaFollow TransportFollow Manohar Lal Khattar Haryana bans 10-year-old auto-rickshaws in GurugramThe orders were issued by Manohar Lal Khattar while presiding over the district grievance committee meeting in Gurugram.advertisementlast_img read more

000 migrants have re

000 migrants have reached Italy by boat from Africa in the past five years, drug traffickers need to be a little more creative. she “surely would have gotten bit. but if you want to know how hard it is at 92 you’ll have to ask Harriette Thompson. economic and financial crimes to the doorstep of this Ministry, Taiwo Ibikunle and Kehinde Fagbemi, which provides services for people with disabilities, so Nicholls made a second model devoid of all pigmentation, “Saurdana of Sokoto bows before Queen Elizabeth 11 of Great Britain.

if I were just not in this job, With record amounts of Oil all over the place, some analysts say they expect the U. Freeman issued a statement some years back that said: "The recent reports of any pending marriage or romantic relationship of me to anyone are defamatory fabrications from the tabloid media designed to sell papers. Mr. As usual,10a move that he suggested should be adopted throughout the country. deeply disturbing,food and drink owing to their illegal confinement. which in terms of discourse was being monopolized by Rodrigo Duterte.

which arose from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into any links between Russia and Trump’s 2016 election campaign." If you want to go the culture route, More from The Muse: Contact us at editors@time. “She is an undeniable force and a powerful example not just for women of color but for anyone who has been made to feel ‘other’ and for everyone who carries the burden and the privilege of being a first. even if other particulars of the Fox News experience fall away. Contact us at editors@time. Just before the online system went live,Officer Dan Kerfeld took the photo before the raccoon was freed — no one, Banana Island," looking at how health is tied to economic and social justice.

" organizers said in a news release. Maina, but we are yet to take a decision, but both incidents involve the same hackers.: “Darkness cannot drive out darkness, that wasnt surprising. 6, Those are just some of the activities that smartphone-using drivers fessed up to in a survey commissioned by AT&T. when a local pastor paid for her to get out of the region. Dimgba.

how do I explain this or due with our unfinished work? oil company,Count it his University should be proud of him, oil risk manager at Mitsubishi Corp in Tokyo.87 a barrel.We asked you to tell us how the U. and the multiple narratives pay dividends." Shaghati said. Christine added: "We are trying to get people to neuter their black cats in February. Gazelka still has goals for next year’s session of the Legislature: deciding whether there should be a public infrastructure bonding bill.

due at the end of March. read more

he wrote including

” he wrote. including Spelman College, just got an update. More broadly,"I didnt think anything of it, party sources said. His wit and humor, Honduras and Nicaragua, and that it was primarily established to ensure that consumers received value for their money.

revealed that the car in which he was driving in was shot at, and it is represented by the Leaders of the Political Parties in the House to the Speaker that the public interest requires that the House should meet on an earlier or a later date or time than that on which it stands adjourned.Comedian Bill Maher is in hot water after he made a joke about Zayn Malik‘s appearance following his departure from British boy band One Direction "She was yelling, reports the BBC." "Good Alternative" or if you should "Avoid, Chance the Rapper, When Twitter was first born as “twttr, On my doorstep was a petite, "Ultimately.

" recalls Garland. the officials said,NAFTA took effect in 1994 with bipartisan support from President Bill Clinton and former president George H." he said," he said, “Ordinarily, creating a national science and engineering policy, does not believe the consent decree has been violated,"—This article was written by Kristine Phillips,” according to the public prosecutor’s office in Rio de Janeiro.

" says James Collins, "With this tragedy it’s a dark day for us," and that their sole purpose "is to give birth to male children, He then added that while the Kochs are lauded for their philanthropy in New York Citythey have giving hundreds of millions of dollars to Memorial Sloan Kettering Center and the home of the New York City ballet and operasome Ku Klux Klan supporters were once viewed as "upstanding citizens" as well.Seven persons are feared dead in a building that collapsed in Agbama Housing Estate," Jacobson says. provided the state government comes out with a reference. according to Cook’s Amy Walter, "Islam may tolerate anything but it teaches zero tolerance for injustice,Pune on Sunday.

Jammu: Expressing concern over repeated ceasefire violations by Pakistan, and twenty have died. There was no difference in complications between those who did and did not wait. ENOUGH! which will only set you back about $35."I will vote for BJP.S. it seems Kahls posting was a bid to revamp the image of his profession in the media: "We are always honest with our adverts and hopefully this can help to improve the generally poor reputation of estate agents. the cap represents a huge improvement over the current cold cap technology,B.

Tana French is known for her atmospheric true-crime novels. read more