NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Part-Time Overnight Security Officer at Securtias Security ServicesFull-Time Retail Salesperson at Mattress FirmFull-Time Technician I at Charles River LabsFull-Time Sales & Client Management Representative at Cochrane VentilationFull-Time (Temp) Animal Care Technician I at Charles River LabsPart-Time Event Design & Decor Intern at Art Of The EventFull-Time Service Technician at Cochrane Ventilation Full-Time ABA Teacher Assistant at May InstitutePart-Time Shift Leader at DunkinPart-Time Crew Member at Dunkin(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 11, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Scientists Build AntiMosquito Laser

first_img Citation: Scientists Build Anti-Mosquito Laser (2009, March 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-03-scientists-anti-mosquito-laser.html Explore further The anti-mosquito laser was originally introduced by astrophysicist Lowell Wood in the early 1980s, but the idea never took off. More recently, former Microsoft executive Nathan Myhrvold revived the laser idea when Bill Gates asked him to explore new ways of combating malaria. Now, astrophysicist Jordin Kare from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Wood, Myhrvold, and other experts have developed a handheld laser that can locate individual mosquitoes and kill them one by one. The developers hope that the technology might be used to create a laser barrier around a house or village that could kill or blind the insects. Alternatively, flying drones equipped with anti-mosquito lasers could track the insects with radar and then sweep the sky with the laser.The researchers are tuning the strength of the laser so that it kills mosquitoes without harming other insects or, especially, people. The system can even distinguish between males and females by the frequency of their wing movements, which may be important since only females spread the parasite. In experiments, the system could target mosquitoes with a flashlight, and then uses a zoom lens to feed the data to the computer, which fires at the insect. Each time the laser strikes a mosquito, the computer makes a gunshot sound. When the mosquito is hit, it bursts into flame and falls to the ground, and a thin plume of smoke rises. The anti-mosquito laser is just one of many novel ways to kill the disease-carrying insects, in addition to the conventional strategy of vaccinating humans. Other ideas include devices that disrupt the mosquitoes’ senses of sight, smell, and heat; feeding them poisoned blood; infecting them with a genetically altered bacterium; and creating a malaria-free mutant to overtake the natural mosquitoes.via: Wall Street Journal© 2009 PhysOrg.com A laser that kills mosquitoes could help reduce the spread of malaria. Image credit: PlaneMad/Wikipedia Protein plays key role in transmitting deadly malaria parasite (PhysOrg.com) — In an effort to prevent the spread of malaria, scientists have built a laser that shoots and kills mosquitoes. Malaria, which is caused by a parasite and transmitted by mosquitoes, kills about 1 million people every year. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Chinese propose method for deflecting asteroid Apophis

first_img Apophis is approximately 880 feet in diameter and weighs an estimated 46 million tons. If it were to strike the earth, it would most certainly cause damage for thousands of miles around the epicenter, but wouldn’t spell doom for the planet as a whole.First discovered in 2004 by Roy Tucker, David Tholen and Fabrizio Bernardi at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, Apophis was after initial study, thought to have a possibility of hitting the earth; then after further study, it appeared that an impact was unlikely. Then later it was noted that when Apophis makes a close approach in 2029, there is a possibility that it could pass through what is known as a “keyhole” (a small gravitational zone near enough a planet to alter the course of an object) near our planet that could cause the next pass, in 2036, to hit us. Because of the dizzying number of variables involved in such a scenario, however, there appears to be differing views as to the probability of that actually happening. There also seems to be some disagreement as to the origin of its name; some suggest that Apophis comes from the ancient Egyptian deity, enemy of the uncreator Ra, Apep. Others suggest it’s simply a nod to the character Apophis on the television show Stargate SG-1.In either case, Gong et al, propose using a space vehicle propelled by a solar sail that would move in a retrograde (opposite) orbit relative to Apophis fast enough so that when the collision occurred (like two cars running head on into each other on a freeway) the vessel would strike the asteroid moving at a relative speed of some 55 miles per second, enough they say, to push the offending asteroid off its current path.The problem is, as the Chinese group readily admit, is in being precise enough in aiming the vessel. With all the variables at play (including the years it would have to travel) it would seem an almost impossible task. Nonetheless, the team seems undaunted, suggesting that such a vehicle could be built and launched in the time frame available. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Orientation of the sail cone and clock angles. Image: arXiv:1108.3183v1 [astro-ph.IM] More information: Utilization of H-reversal Trajectory of Solar Sail for Asteroid Deflection, Shengping Gong, Junfeng Li, Xiangyuan Zeng, arXiv:1108.3183v1 [astro-ph.IM] arxiv.org/abs/1108.3183AbstractNear Earth Asteroids have a possibility of impacting with the Earth and always have a thread on the Earth. This paper proposes a way of changing the trajectory of the asteroid to avoid the impaction. Solar sail evolving in a H-reversal trajectory is utilized for asteroid deflection. Firstly, the dynamics of solar sail and the characteristics of the H-reversal trajectory are analyzed. Then, the attitude of the solar sail is optimized to guide the sail to impact with the object asteroid along a H-reversal trajectory. The impact velocity depends on two important parameters: the minimum solar distance along the trajectory and lightness number. A larger lightness number and a smaller solar distance lead to a higher impact velocity. Finally, the deflection capability of a solar sail impacting with the asteroid along the H-reversal is discussed. The results show that a 10 kg solar sail with a lead-time of one year can move Apophis out of a 600-m keyhole area in 2029 to eliminate the possibility of its resonant return in 2036.Via ArXiv blog Explore further NASA Statement on Student Asteroid Calculations © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: Chinese propose method for deflecting asteroid Apophis (2011, August 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-chinese-method-deflecting-asteroid-apophis.html (PhysOrg.com) — Chinese scientist Shengping Gong and associates at Tsinghua University in Beijin have proposed an alternative method of deflecting the asteroid Apophis to ensure that it does not strike the earth. They believe that rather than just blowing it up ala the European Space Agency’s Don Quijote project, a better approach would be to use a solar sail, as described in their paper on the preprint server arXiv, to slowly nudge the asteroid off its trajectory just enough to keep it from bothering us here on Earth. last_img read more