Purplebricks Australia ‘growing’

first_imgMichael Bruce, CEO, Purplebricks, says that its launch into Australia has had a fantastic start.“The Australian people have been more vocal about the need for change in their market than anywhere I’ve visited or seen in the world and they are demonstrating that by instructing Purplebricks to sell their properties.“We’re being successful in growing that; over $1 million of revenue in the first seven weeks, more people instructing us whether by private treaty or by auctions, auctions are very popular in Australia and we have undertaken a number of auctions and undertaken them really successfully.“So Australia is a fantastic start, we intend to grow that country, we intend to launch in other regions within Australia in due course.”Purplebricks Purplebricks Australian market Purplebricks Australia February 16, 2017The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Purplebricks Australia ‘growing’ previous nextAgencies & PeoplePurplebricks Australia ‘growing’Company reports $1m of revenue in first seven weeks.The Negotiator16th February 20170803 Viewslast_img read more

BRIEFS

first_imgNY Waterway and Mack Cali invite kids under 12 to the first free Harborside Kids Fest at the air-conditioned Atrium in Harborside, 210 Hudson St., Jersey City, on Saturday Aug. 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This family-friendly event offers sweet treats, contests and demos from a dozen local vendors. Kids under the age of 12 ride free on all NY Waterway ferries through Labor Day, Sept. 3. Kids and parents can enjoy contests from Hudson Play and Capitol Wrestling, a bouncy house from J TaeKwondo and Kickboxing Academy, and dancing demos by the Surati School of Performing Arts. Special $5 per day weekend parking will be available at the staffed parking lot at 195 Hudson St., just steps away from the entrance to the Harborside Atrium. Harborside also is served by the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and NJ TRANSIT buses. For more information, call 1-800-53-FERRY, or visit www.nywaterway.com or www.facebook.com/nywaterway or www.twitter.com/ridetheferry. ×NY Waterway and Mack Cali invite kids under 12 to the first free Harborside Kids Fest at the air-conditioned Atrium in Harborside, 210 Hudson St., Jersey City, on Saturday Aug. 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This family-friendly event offers sweet treats, contests and demos from a dozen local vendors. Kids under the age of 12 ride free on all NY Waterway ferries through Labor Day, Sept. 3. Kids and parents can enjoy contests from Hudson Play and Capitol Wrestling, a bouncy house from J TaeKwondo and Kickboxing Academy, and dancing demos by the Surati School of Performing Arts. Special $5 per day weekend parking will be available at the staffed parking lot at 195 Hudson St., just steps away from the entrance to the Harborside Atrium. Harborside also is served by the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and NJ TRANSIT buses. For more information, call 1-800-53-FERRY, or visit www.nywaterway.com or www.facebook.com/nywaterway or www.twitter.com/ridetheferry. ACLU-NJ includes West New York in lawsuit accusing 12 school districts of anti-immigrant discriminationThe ACLU-NJ has targeted West New York as one 12 school districts statewide, in a lawsuit accusing them of discriminating against immigrants and children of immigrants.In a press release issued Thursday, July 26, the ACLU says the districts require forms of state-issued identification requiring Social Security numbers or valid immigration status as a condition for student enrollment.The suit against West New York uses its online student registration page to back its claims.On the page, the district requests that parents bring either a valid driver’s license, passport, or state ID to their registration appointments.“By requiring a form of identification that is only available to residents who have Social Security numbers or a valid immigration status in order to register a child for a school, the [West New York] school district denies an education to students with parents who are undocumented immigrants,” the lawsuit says. “It also discourages immigrants from attempting to enroll their children in the school district.”Federal law prohibits school districts from requiring students to disclose or document their immigration status. They are also forbidden from making any inquiries of students or parents that could expose undocumented status.center_img Additionally, N.J.A.C. 6A:22-3.3 prohibits barring any students from public elementary and secondary schools on the basis of immigration or visa status.West New York has a large Latin immigrant population. Last year, the West New York Board of education even declared the district a “safe zone” for all school age children, regardless of immigration status.When reached by phone, Superintendent of Schools Clara Brito Herrera said she had forwarded the lawsuit to the school board attorney for review. “We always respect our students and our parents, regardless of their immigration status,” Herrera commented. “We are a high densely populated district with a high number of immigrant students in West New York, including myself. We have never turned away any student for lack of documentation.” 79-year-old man arrested for alleged stabbing near homeless encampmentVerdejo Cruz, 79, of Union City, has been arrested in connection with the alleged stabbing death of an apparently homeless man on July 13 in the area of Third Street and Manhattan Avenue in Union City.Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez said on July 13 at around 7:40 p.m., Union City Police, responding to a report, found a male victim by the makeshift homes near Third Street and Manhattan Avenue. The man, who has not been positively identified, was unresponsive with multiple wounds to his upper torso. He was pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center at approximately 8:55 p.m.Cruz, who was located at the scene, has been charged with aggravated manslaughter and weapons charges. Suarez credited the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office Homicide Unit and the Union City Police Department for the arrest.Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office at (201) 915-1345 or leave an anonymous tip on the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office website at http://www.hudsoncountyprosecutorsofficenj.org/homicide-tip/. Union City commissioners backtrack on resolution opposing North Bergen power plantThe Union City Board of Commissioners has rescinded a resolution opposing the proposed $1.8 billion North Bergen natural gas plant, according to city spokeswoman Erin Knoedler. The commissioners originally passed the resolution on July 10, arguing the plant would produce mass greenhouse gas emissions and further complicate north Jersey’s power infrastructure.“We just wanted to give North Bergen the opportunity to properly vet the project fully, before other localities weigh in,” Knoedler said, regarding the turnabout, on Tuesday, July 24. “Also we don’t know what Gov. Phil Murphy will do.”Knoedler was likely referencing Murphy’s uncertainty surrounding the controversial proposal. In May, the governor didn’t take a strong stance when a local reporter asked for his take on the plant. He was confused as to how Jersey would benefit, because all the energy produced by the plant would go to New York City. “I have to admit I always scratch my head when something is being done here that another state will benefit from,” he said. “Beyond that I don’t have an opinion.”North Bergen Liberty Generating, the company behind the proposal, argues that natural gas gives off fewer emissions than coal or oil. They also say that natural gas can create more electricity with smaller land use than renewable options, such as wind or solar power. North Bergen officials are in support, saying the plant would generate hundreds of union jobs and millions in tax revenue for the township.Local environmentalists, however, counter that the plant is a biohazard waiting to happen.“These [officials] will tell you that this is the best deal that we can get, and it’s not,” said Hackensack Riverkeeper Bill Sheehan at a press conference denouncing the plant in May. He was joined by other advocacy groups.But regardless of the opposition, the plan proposal continues to move forward. On June 26, the state DEP issued permits authorizing a gas turbine, two storm water outfall structures, and the installation of the cables under the Hudson River.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers still needs to approve the plan.Surface parking lot improvement program announcedThe West New York Parking Authority (WNYPA) has announced that it will begin a series of construction projects as part of its Surface Parking Lot Improvement Program. The initiative’s goal is to improve the surface conditions of municipal lots throughout the city, including work onpavement reconstruction, improving drainage, replacing damaged guardrails, repairing catch basins, improving lot signals, and restriping lots to accommodate more parking spaces where permitted. During this time, residents, visitors, and business owners of West New York may notice lot closures and changes in traffic patterns during construction periods.WNYPA has selected the following lots to receive upgrades as part of the program: 67th Street parking lot, 66th Street parking lot, 62nd Street parking lot, 59th Street parking lot, 58th Street parking lot, 54th Street parking lot, and 55th Street parking lot. Each lot will be closed for 4-5 days for construction work. Lots closest to public schools will be first to receive this treatment.For more information on the Surface Parking Lot Improvement Program, contact the WNYPA directly by calling (201) 295-1575. Additional resources and information are available at www.wnyparkingauthority.org. Route 495 lane closures start August 10The state DOT is set to close traffic lanes on Route 495, starting Aug. 10, according to a press release. The shutdowns are part of a massive $90.3 million, state-funded rehabilitation project on the Route 495 Bridge.The headaches commence with the closure of the 31st Street ramp from JFK Boulevard to 495 westbound in North Bergen on the 10th. Traffic will be detoured onto Paterson Plank Road. On the 17th, one lane on 495 will be closed 24/7 in both directions. This will severely limit roadway capacity.Work on the span includes repairing and reconstructing the bridge deck, replacing and strengthening its deteriorated structural steel, and repairing and painting the substructure. The project’s first phase began in September of 2017 with local street improvements.The entire project is projected to finish around summer 2021. Motorists are advised to consider alternative routes during that time, such as the George Washington Bridge, Holland Tunnel, public transportation, or carpooling. For more information, email the DOT at [email protected], or call 201-408-8495.HRPAC announces August concertsThe next Wednesday night concerts set for Summer Concerts on the Hudson at Lincoln Harbor Park in Weehawken will be Ranky Tanky, on Aug. 8, and Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, on Aug. 15. Both shows start at 7 p.m.From Charleston, S.C., Ranky Tanky released its first CD in October 2017 and by December, Ranky Tanky had been profiled on NPR’s nationally syndicated radio show, “Fresh Air,” with Terry Gross. The album then soared to the No. 1 position on the Billboard, iTunes, and Amazon Jazz Charts. This group performs Gullah music from the Georgia and Carolina Sea Islands with jazz inspiration and a New Orleans twist.For nearly two decades, the Catskill Mountains hid singer and songwriter Arleigh Kincheloe, until one day she said goodbye to her hometown and moved to New York City to start the hard soul collective, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds. The group has performed more than 700 shows and made their national TV debut on NBC’s “Today Show.” They’ve released three full-length studio albums, including their most recent, the acclaimed “The Weather Below.”These free concerts will take place at Lincoln Harbor Park, located just north of the Chart House restaurant directly on the west bank of the Hudson River in Weehawken, New Jersey. Free parking is available and public transportation, including NJ Transit bus 158 from the Port Authority and Light Rail, will bring concertgoers to Lincoln Harbor. Please use 1700 Harbor Boulevard for GPS directions.For more information including the full summer concert schedule, directions, updates, and rain date info, please check the HRPAC website, www.hrpac.org, or call the concert info line at (201) 716-4540.Union City commissioners backtrack on resolution opposing North Bergen power plantThe Union City Board of Commissioners have rescinded a resolution opposing the proposed $1.8 billion North Bergen natural gas plant, according to city spokeswoman Erin Knoedler. The commissioners originally passed the resolution on July 10, arguing the plant would produce mass greenhouse gas emissions and further complicate north Jersey’s power infrastructure.“We just wanted to give North Bergen the opportunity to properly vet the project fully, before other localities weigh in,” Knoedler said, regarding the turnabout, on Tuesday. “Also we don’t know what Gov. Phil Murphy will do.”Knoedler was likely referencing Murphy’s uncertainty surrounding the controversial proposal. In May, the governor didn’t take a strong stance when a local reporter asked for his take on the plant.He was also confused as to how Jersey would benefit, because all the energy produced by the plant would go to New York City. “I have to admit I always scratch my head when something is being done here that another state will benefit from,” he said. “Beyond that I don’t have an opinion.”North Bergen Liberty Generating, the company behind the proposal, argues that natural gas gives off fewer emissions than coal or oil. They also say that natural gas can create more electricity with smaller land use than renewable options, such as wind or solar power. North Bergen officials are in support, saying the plant would generate hundreds of union jobs and millions in tax revenue for the township.Local environmentalists, however, counter that the plant is a biohazard waiting to happen.“These [officials] will tell you that this is the best deal that we can get, and it’s not,” said Hackensack Riverkeeper Bill Sheehan at a press conference denouncing the plant in May. He was joined by other advocacy groups.But regardless of the opposition, the plan proposal continues to move forward. On June 26, the state DEP issued permits authorizing a gas turbine, two storm water outfall structures, and the installation of the cables under the Hudson River.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers still needs to approve the plan.Roseland launches leasing for RiverHouse 11 at Port ImperialDeveloper Roseland Residential Trust said last week they have started leasing RiverHouse 11 at Port Imperial, the 10-story addition to the ongoing $2-billion, 200-acre Port Imperial waterfront development that runs from Weehawken to Guttenberg.Utlimately it will include 20 upscale residential, retail, and hotel properties.Located at the edge of the Hudson River at 1100 Avenue at Port Imperial in Weehawken, RiverHouse 11 features 295 apartments ranging from studio to three-bedroom residences. Apartment finishes include luxury wood-style plank floors, Moen, Kohler, and Sterling fixtures in kitchens and bathrooms, full-height backsplashes, and private terraces and balconies in select homes.Amenities include a sky terrace with stadium seating, outdoor lounges with fire pit and fireplaces, barbeque grilling stations and a bocce court, a resort-style pool and sundeck, a fitness center with a yoga and spin studio as well as a rock-climbing wall, a business center, conference rooms, and a Wi-Fi café with computer stations in social rooms, a theater room, game room, music room, and golf simulator lounge, crayon corner, a community garden, and 24-hour concierge, emergency maintenance, and package lockers.RiverHouse 11 is convenient to public transportation options including direct ferry service to Manhattan and Light Rail service along the river.Deadline is Sept. 7 for Kennedy Dancers Inner City Youth ScholarshipSept. 7 is the deadline for Kennedy Dancers afterschool scholarships for students ages 13-18 years old. This scholarship provides unlimited dance classes at no cost for up to two years.All applicants must provide proof of residency in the following places: Jersey City, East Newark, Guttenberg, Harrison, Kearny, Weehawken, West New York, and Secaucus. Applicants must also provide a complete ICY intake form, proof of identification (parent and student) and proof of income.Those accepted must purchase a “Dance Essentials” package ($100): Kennedy Dancers shorts, one pair of tan tights, one pair of pink tights, one dance skirt, and one pair of tan jazz shoes. They must also go through a scheduled dance evaluation appointment to determine their skill level.For more information go to http://www.kennedydancers.org/.last_img read more

Pieminister on the ball

first_imgPieminister has launched a new flavour in response to demand for original vegetarian pies. Its Mean Bean Pie is filled with Mexican three-bean chilli, butternut squash and fresh coriander.The pie makers will also be marking the Football World Cup this summer with the launch of two new products in May: the Fabio Pie, which contains British beef and Italian sausage; and the Rooney Roll, which is made with prime cuts of outdoor reared British pork and chilli.Pieminister’s award-winning range of pies is available at its shops in Bristol, Oxford, Trentham and London, as well as a number of food market stalls and online.Wholesale price: Mean Bean £2.30; Fabio Pie £2.35; Rooney Roll £0.80.last_img

Jasanoff lectures as Sarton Chair

first_imgSheila Jasanoff, Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies and director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Harvard Kennedy School, is the 2010-11 Sarton Chair in History of Science at Ghent University, Belgium. Jasanoff is the first Harvard scholar to receive this distinction. The chair honors the life and work of the late George Sarton, a pioneer in history of science who served on Harvard’s history of science faculty for many years. As this year’s Sarton chair, Jasanoff gave two lectures in Ghent on Oct. 27 and 28, which will be published in the annual journal Sartoniana.For more information on the Sarton Chair.last_img

9/11 haunts national conscience

first_imgTwelve years after the World Trade Center tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001, the United States’ foreign policy remains affected by the attack’s lingering effects and “oversensitivity to terrorism,” according to experts. Michael Desch, Notre Dame political science professor and fellow at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace, said the Sept. 11 attack was catalytic and disproportionate in its political impact. “One of the real consequences you see is the willingness of the American public to do things in the name of preventing another 9/11 that they would otherwise not agree to, including two long wars overseas and some pretty significant restrictions of our civil liberties at home,” Desch said.  The American public perceives the possibility of a repeated attack as much greater than it truly is, Desch said. “I think the magnitude of the threat of international terrorism historically is very low, a lot lower than the probability of dying in a car crash or from domestic gun violence or other things like that,” he said. “And yet, we tend to remain fixated on the possibility of another terrorist attack in a way that’s out of sync with the real danger it presents to us.” Daniel Lindley, a Notre Dame political science associate professor and a fellow with the Kroc Institute, said he sees two major ways the memory of Sept.11 still affects today’s politics. “First of all, we see it in the general sensitivity to terrorism. We still spend a lot of money trying to combat terrorism, in particular through intelligence programs,” Lindley said.  “Second, you see a huge amount of war wariness in America. The opposition to a Syrian strike right now is unbelievably huge on Capitol Hill, and that’s partly because of the wars we were involved in after 9/11.” Lindley said the United States’ response to the attack in 2001 had major consequences, including becoming involved in two wars, hurting relations with some armed members of the Muslim world and “getting bogged down in Iraq and Afghanistan.”  Marc Belanger, chair of the Saint Mary’s Department of Political Science, said American intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan damaged relations with some of the United States’ allies and created problems for foreign policy with respect to the Middle East.  “The tendency of the United States to expect others to accept our definition of the War on Terrorism, especially in the wake of the Iraq War, in particular, undermined the reputation of the United States globally, especially in the Arab world,” Belanger said. “You can see that right now with the nation dealing with a response to Syria and the use of chemical weapons.” Belanger said he often wonders whether or not it is really possible to fight a war on terrorism.  “You can fight a war on Al Qaeda, but can you fight against a political method?” Belanger said. “It is such an imprecise, slippery concept – a misnomer which has led to a lot of confusion.” Desch and Lindley said the public’s tendency to overreact to any suggestion of terrorism has adversely affected today’s international relations policies.   “I think the general proclivity has been to overreact, and I think it’s a function of the fact that 9/11 involved an event that was unexpected and surprising and certainly horrific in its consequences,” Desch said. “But not more horrific than other wars or other things that kill people or cause grievous injury.  “Inasmuch as we overreact, the ghost of Osama bin Laden is smiling because a key objective of terrorism is symbolic, and the symbolic force of a terrorist attack is magnified when a target overreacts.” Lindley said any act of terrorism, from 9/11 to the Boston Marathon attack, “wakes people up,” but not overreacting is crucial. “It’s of course prudent to take reasonable steps against terrorism, as with any national security threat,” he said. “However, … we have to put things in historical perspective and be confident that the United States will survive almost any crisis.” Belanger said attacks on the twin towers did impact the way the United States “faced the enemy.” “For a time, there was this sense that with facing an enemy like this we have to take our gloves off and are going to have ‘to go over to the dark side’ like Cheney famously said,” Belanger said.  Belanger said this notion undermined the legitimacy of the United States when it comes to human rights concerns. “Certain methods used under the Bush administration made it harder for us to speak from a moral high ground as a country and made it harder for us to challenge human rights abuses in other places in the world,” he said. Belanger said when a country of the United States’ prominence violates its own standards, the nation becomes vulnerable. “9/11 took us down some different paths,” he said. “Some of the different methods we have used are in clear violation of human rights and that makes us vulnerable as a nation. I would not necessarily say this makes us vulnerable to foreign attack, but rather makes us vulnerable to losing our reputation as a nation with diplomatic good will.” Desch said he would advise a “keep calm and carry on” approach to terrorism. “For us, terrorism has been a source of panic,” he said. “The contrast between a sensible, reasoned assessment with prudent steps versus what we’ve done is quite striking.”last_img read more

Households with high-speed Internet increase in Vermont, but digital divide remains

first_imgThe proportion of Vermont households with high-speed or broadband Internet connections has increased from 9% in 2001 to slightly more than 66% in 2009, according to the statewide Vermonter Poll conducted by the Center for Rural Studies at the University of Vermont.  Of households that did not have Internet or broadband, nearly 46% said that they knew broadband was available to them, while 17% were not sure.Despite the overall increase in household broadband, there is still evidence of a digital divide.  According to this year’s poll, 44% of responding households making less than $25,000/year have computers, compared to 83% of all households and 91% of households making more than $25,000.”Citizens can t be connected unless they have a computer,” says Center for Rural Studies Co-Director, Jane Kolodinsky.  “While progress is being made with regard to access to personal computers and the Internet, we can’t ‘level the playing field’ for Vermont students and adults in terms of access to the information highway until the digital divide issues are solved.”A majority of all Vermont households that have Internet have a high-speed connection, but lower income households in that group are slightly less likely to have broadband than others.  According to the poll, 76% of households with Internet making less than $50,000 have broadband versus 85% of households making more.Traditionally there has also been a rural divide in high-speed Internet.  According to the poll, 76% of rural households with Internet connections have broadband versus urban (88%) or suburban (93%) households.  It should be noted however that urban households are less likely to have Internet overall (69% versus 84-85% for urban and suburban).  This may be due to the fact that a higher proportion of urban households in Vermont are in lower income groups.  Overall suburban households in Vermont are more likely to have Internet and broadband.Overall nearly 82% of polled households have an Internet connection.  Of connected households, 18% had dial-up, 24% had a cable modem, 42% had DSL, nearly 7% had satellite Internet, 6% had a wireless Internet service, and 3% had fiber-optic or some other service.  Generally anything faster than dial-up is considered to be broadband, although speeds may vary.Between those that have broadband and those that answered about the availability of high-speed Internet, at least 79% of households in this poll have broadband available to them.  The State of Vermont has made 2010 a target for 100% broadband availability in the state.  In the past, polled households have expressed varying support for State and community efforts to expand broadband service.  The 2007 Vermonter Poll found a majority (58%) of respondents in support of the allocation of State funds toward universal broadband.  However only a minority (36%) was in favor of the use of municipal funds for the development of broadband infrastructure.Last year, the Vermonter Poll asked more focused questions about the favorability of respondents toward the use of local resources to work “alone or in partnership with other municipalities to develop high-speed Internet infrastructure, such as data lines or wireless transmitters, so that companies may use them to sell high-speed Internet connections to local residents and businesses.”  The understanding was that any municipal investment eventually would be paid back through fees charged for the use of the new infrastructure.  A vast majority of respondents (77%) were in favor of having their city or town involved in such an effort.  When the question was focused to ask if respondents were in favor of an effort exclusively in fiber-optic infrastructure, much faster than typical broadband, a majority (73%) said yes once again.For a detailed report on the information technology questions from the 2009 Vermonter Poll, please go to http://crs.uvm.edu/vtrpoll/2009(link is external).The Vermonter Poll is a statistically representative, statewide telephone poll conducted annually by the Center for Rural Studies at the University of Vermont.  Responses are limited to Vermont households with telephones, not including cell phones .  Households are selected randomly using a list of telephone numbers generated from Vermont telephone directories.  The 2009 Vermonter Poll was conducted February 18-27 and includes responses to questions on a wide range of topics from 615 Vermont households.last_img read more

Here’s A Bright Idea: Turn Shoreham’s Old Nuke Plant Into A New Cargo Port

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York With proper analysis and data-driven urban planning, the key to Long Island’s economic future may just require a mile more of roadway and a new purpose for a decommissioned nuclear power plant.In a report released on March 18 by the Long Island Association outlining the organization’s 15 top priorities, most of the initiatives were typical of any organization that deals with regional issues here: suppressing rising costs of living and doing business, creating additional housing options, increasing transit accessibility, etc. Buried among the tired suggestions Long Islanders so frequently see, the LIA wrote the following:“Also support efforts to create a clean energy economy on Long Island by encouraging the growth of the region’s wind and solar industries and advocate that LIPA donate the Shoreham nuclear power plant site for a cargo port and/or manufacturing park for wind turbines and/or solar panels.”The LIA’s call for a cargo port at the former Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant site, if executed and planned for appropriately, is the best old/new idea the Island has seen since the concept was first proposed in the 1960s.Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner who brought professional urban planning to Suffolk County and eventually Nassau, first suggested the concept five decades ago. Since then, the notion of a cross-Sound link at Shoreham has taken many turns, including a bridge. Other ideas may have come and gone, but the isolated location of the nuclear plant and the relatively sparse wetlands at the shoreline make the Shoreham site ideal for a crossing of some kind.Whenever any big ideas for our region get mentioned, Long Islanders typically scoff—the byproduct of a jaded public, thanks to halfhearted proposals, stakeholder-driven studies and countless shelved comprehensive plans. Despite this cynicism, it’s important for policymakers and planners to think beyond throwing residential density at our economic stagnation.On Long Island, large-scale proposals are always cyclical. Think of the frequent resurrection of the Bayville-Rye crossing that occurs almost every five years. This time the LIA has showed excellent timing in making a new cargo port at Shoreham a priority.It’s always nice to think big, but it’s critical for the LIA and policymakers to seriously explore the concept that they buried on the third page of their priorities list. Any further study of the concept must answer the following questions: How large would the cargo port be? Historically, the seaports in New York have fallen into disuse. Is a new seaport of some variety feasible in the Tristate Region? How will completion of AVR’s The Meadows at Yaphank change the traffic dynamics in the area? Will people want to use a ferry service at this location? The two ferry companies now, one from Port Jefferson, the other from Orient Point, are barely holding their own.The port proposal will only be realistic if people use it, so it’s essential that the review accurately models the usage and projects the cargo demand, the number of truck trips generated and whether our existing freight-rail infrastructure could handle the additional loads. As with any other development proposal, a serious data-driven analysis and feasibility study would have to be conducted.Although important questions still need to be answered, existing assets can already be identified.The most important one is the Shoreham site’s isolation. Nestled along the woods of the North Shore, sufficiently buffered from neighboring homes and the protests that inevitably come when their backyards are threatened, sits the Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant, a structure that stands as a testament to misguided energy policy. Built by LILCO for $6 billion but never used, the structure is currently the burden of every utility ratepayer on Long Island. Shoreham would be ideal for a multifaceted cargo port, with the area’s straight shoreline and underutilized waterfront. The cargo port proposal, with the opportunity to link Long Island to New Haven via ferry service in under an hour, is the 800-acre site’s chance to redeem itself.The next asset is the ease of connectivity. If the ferry terminal is built as the William Floyd Parkway is extended, it would allow for a critical transportation link to New England and beyond. It is essential that the LIA advocates not only for a cargo port, but for a multifaceted port that includes passenger ferries as well because they would ensure that the site will be viable. According to the New York State Department of Transportation, William Floyd Parkway has a present design capacity of 57,000 vehicle trips per day. Currently, the road is at 43 percent capacity, with only 25,000 vehicle trips per day using the route. So the route could definitely withstand increased volume.Due to a decision made decades ago by Suffolk County when the William Floyd Parkway was constructed, it now terminates at Route 25A. The Shoreham Nuclear Plant is a mere 1.23 miles north of the point where the Parkway currently stops, and the right-of-way to extend the route is vacant. If these undeveloped parcels were bisected by the William Floyd Extension to the proposed port, the nearest houses to the west of the roadway would be half a mile away, and the homes on the east would be a mile. Dr. Koppelman originally recommended giving the William Floyd extension just one entry/exit point at 25A and no others until it terminates at the Shoreham site, further protecting the neighboring communities from any unwanted traffic. Thanks to the site’s close proximity in Suffolk to both the Brookhaven Rail Terminal and Long Island Expressway, goods could be shipped off the Island in many ways.About 24 miles across the Long Island Sound lies New Haven, a city that has industry along its shoreline. It also offers a gateway to New England and Canada. Interstate 91, whose southern terminus runs directly through New Haven, shoots straight up north to the Canadian border in Derby Line, Vermont. It’s the potential linkage to this highway that makes both the cargo port and Shoreham-New Haven ferry so appealing.Long Island’s current ferry ports don’t have the economic potential that the Shoreham-New Haven route promises. The Orient Point Cross-Sound ferry, which connects the Island to New London, is 40 miles further to the east. It is limited by the one-lane approach road and distinct lack of parking. Port Jefferson harbor, the site of the ferry to Bridgeport, is a deepwater port similar to Shoreham, but it primarily accepts fuel and oil shipments for the 64-year-old Port Jefferson power plant, whose future isn’t looking too bright thanks to the looming threat of its decommission.Meanwhile, policymakers in Connecticut are pushing hard for trucks coming from New England with cargo bound for Long Island or New York City to be diverted from I-95 to New London, where they would then take the Orient Point ferry, so the pressure is on to find a viable solution to our freight transportation issues. Long Islanders have to ask which is worse: extending a mile of road to an already isolated site in Shoreham, or having semi-trailer trucks rumble through the rural winding roads of the North Fork?If Long Island is to remain competitive economically, we will need to maximize our existing assets. The LIA should partner with policymakers from the Assembly and the State Senate, as well as with both Nassau and Suffolk County legislatures, and secure funding from the state and federal level to conduct a realistic, professional assessment of whether a multifaceted cargo port and ferry terminal at Shoreham is feasible. All it would take is about $1 million dollars to fund a dedicated planning effort.The Shoreham Nuclear Plant currently represents Long Island’s broken past. Let’s make the site a showcase for our future.Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

5 tips to help millennials share your vision

first_img 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Eric Budzinski Eric Budzinski is the AVP of Marketing for GrooveCar, Inc. He joined the company in 2015 after building a successful foundation in small business sales and marketing.   Eric can be … Web: www.groovecarinc.com Details Is your credit union capitalizing on the car buying journey of the millennial? You may have wanted to sweep this cohort aside due to trends like ride-sharing and the popularity of environment-friendly bicycles being the ride du jour for these urbanites. However, this is changing as the millennial migrates to the suburbs and begins the process of acquiring all of life’s necessities, just like generations that came before. What do you need to know? This is the most studied generation in history and they want to be highly engaged with your brand. So, give them engagement, at all levels, especially in auto buying.How is your credit union enticing millennials to seek out autos and loans? Let’s remember, this generation will spend 17.6 hours researching their next car purchase before making a decision; which is 25% more time than the national average. Most of that time will be spent in front of a screen. What are your online offerings, aside from online banking? Credit unions can capitalize on millennial member engagement, but they need the right marketing tools and effective engagement campaigns.Here are some tips on how to reach this generation:Put the information in their hands, literally. According to recent data, 80% of millennials shop directly from their mobile devices. Therefore, credit unions need to provide mobile friendly sites, or partner with third parties who can deliver a site easily accessed on any device. Since millennials grew up during the Internet age, they expect their research to be immediate and constant. Gone are the days when car buyers headed to dealerships looking to learn about “the process.” Research and shopping is completely done on the phone or in the home. Over 72% of auto consumers prefer to complete credit and financial paperwork online to save time. Credit unions now have an opportunity to provide this information. Go beyond traditional advertising. Research shows that 82% of millennials do their research through third-party sites. This means that traditional advertising, like newspaper ads and TV commercials, are out, and clickable content is in. Put your ads where millennials will see them to drive traffic back to your site. Include lots of social media and clickable banners to get them where they need to be. Caring is built on sharing. When millennials relate to, and learn from a post on Facebook, they share it. Create a catchy hashtag and watch it go viral as young auto buyers show off their new cars. They are eager to show gratitude to the credit union that help them afford this sweet new ride. There’s real power in social media and this generation relies on it for information. Offer authentic content. Millennials appreciate information that is communicated on their level, and they are likely to follow trends set by their peers. But unlike their parents, they often feel disconnected from financial institutions and lack expertise in their vocabulary. Bridge this divide with educational, value-driven content on platforms they enjoy using. For example, don’t just assume this generation knows what credit unions are, or what they offer. Create a video featuring young people enjoying the services you offer. Check with your partners, as many of these videos and collateral marketing materials already exist and are yours to promote. Write blog posts in casual language, make them funny and engaging. Apply this to your auto growth strategy and watch your portfolio grow. For millennials, trust is built on transparency. Speak their language and you will build brand loyalty.last_img read more

Turkey unveils new tourism strategy for 2023. Promotion budget increased to $ 220 million

first_imgSide dish: Tourism Strategy Turkey 2023 See the new tourism development strategy of Turkey in the attachment. Turkish Minister of Culture and Tourism Mehmet Nuri Ersoy unveiled Turkey’s new tourism strategy for 2023 at a press conference held at Istanbul’s Dolmabahçe Palace on the occasion of World Tourism Day. Promotion budget increased to $ 220 million Also, the minister said he expects an increase in the number of visitors with greater spending potential. In this aspect, they plan to develop new products. So they plan to improve the gastronomic offer with the project “Map with tastes of Turkey” which will create new gastronomic routes, health tourism, educational tourism, sports tourism, religious tourism, congress tourism, retirement tourism and music festivals and events. The minister noted that the plan is to increase the budget earmarked for promotional activities from this year’s $ 72 million to $ 220 million by 2023. The Minister also presented new promotional films that will be used next year to promote Turkey abroad, and which have been developed in accordance with the strategy, reports FTN. But in addition to targeting foreign tourists, the Turkish tourism ministry will also conduct promotional studies for domestic visitors to improve domestic tourism. It will focus on new products and destination studies, especially in developing tourist regions. The “Tourism Strategy for 2023” seeks to transform Turkish tourism into a sustainable income-based growth model and plans to receive over 75 million tourists and reach revenues of $ 65 billion in 2023. Turkish Minister of Culture and Tourism Mehmet Nuri Ersoy They also plan to open new museums throughout Turkey and increase the number of UNESCO protected sites. It will also develop new cycling routes and increase the number of hotels suitable for cyclists. “By keeping digitization at the heart of all our research, we will provide the experience that newer generation tourists are looking for when traveling”, Concluded Minister Mehmet Nuri Ersoy. It will seek to diversify promotional activities on television, in the open, in the print media, in digital media and on social media, in a focused and intensive manner. Target market research is also conducted to meet visitor expectations. Source / photo: Focus on Travel News; Pixabay The strategy, within the goals set out in the development plan, summarizes a plan that expects major changes and improvements in the Turkish tourism sector. “Turkey is a world leader that offers a wide range of travel opportunities and is able to meet all the expectations of today’s tourists. Applying the new strategies in practice, which are part of the ‘Tourism Strategy for 2023’, Turkey will secure the very top of the global tourism market in terms of tourism indicators and revenues. Our goal is to surpass the figure of 75 million arrival in 2023. By increasing the average consumption of tourists and increasing the number of average overnight stays from 9,9 to 10, we will reach an average level of spending of $ 86 per night”, Said Minister Mehmet Nuri Ersoy at a press conference.last_img read more

It’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggests

first_imgThe Washington Post 26 May 2017Family First Comment: Interesting findings – and debunks claims that euthanasia is required because of physical pain..“Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”And“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying… Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”But a study released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests the answers may be surprising: The reasons patients gave for wanting to end their lives had more to do with psychological suffering than physical suffering.The study, based on information from Canada’s University Health Network in Toronto, represents all 74 people who inquired about assistance in dying from March 2016 to March 2017. Most were white and were diagnosed with cancer or a neurological disorder like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying law, or MAiD, allows for adults with serious and incurable diseases in an advanced state to seek help. At the University Health Network, which operates four large hospitals, patients must go through several levels of evaluations, and if they meet the criteria, they can come to the hospital to receive a lethal medication intravenously.For many people, death from a terminal illness may be synonymous with pain. Much of the discussion about assisted suicide focuses on compassionate palliative care for cancer patients and about suffering that can’t be controlled by even the strongest opioids. But that’s not what the people in the new study report.“It’s what I call existential distress,” explained researcher Madeline Li, an associate professor at University of Toronto. “Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”“It has been very surprising to me,” Li said in an interview.One of the main things these patients bring up has to do with “autonomy.” It’s a broad philosophical concept that has to do with being able to make your own decisions, not being dependent on others, wanting to be able to enjoy the things you enjoy and wanting dignity.One patient was a marathon runner before her cancer left her confined to bed. “That was not how she saw her identity,” Li said. Another patient, a university professor, identified his intellect as the most important quality that he values in himself: “He had a brain tumor, and he didn’t want to get to the point of losing control of his own mind, couldn’t think clearly and couldn’t be present.”The study also provides information regarding one of the most controversial aspects of physician-assisted suicide: That it could be forced on the poor, uninsured or those worried about being a burden to their loved ones. In Canada, a requirement for being considered for MAiD is being under the national health insurance program, and most of the patients were financially well-off.A study published in 2015 based on interviews with 159 patients or family members of deceased patients in Oregon — which allowed physicians to give prescriptions for self-administered lethal medications in 1997 — found similarly complex psychological motivations for decisions.“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying,” researchers wrote in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “None of the participants cited responding to bad news, such as the diagnosis of cancer, or a depressed mood as motivations for interest in hastened death. Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”Likewise a study in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999 about the first year of the Oregon law noted: “Many physicians reported that their patients had been decisive and independent throughout their lives or that the decision to request a lethal prescription was consistent with a long-standing belief about the importance of controlling the manner in which they died.”READ MORE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/05/24/its-not-pain-but-existential-distress-that-leads-people-to-assisted-suicide-study-suggests/?utm_term=.7d43595fbbb3Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more