The Apopka news year in review: Richard Anderson enters into plea…

first_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Editor’s Note: This is the fifth in a series of 24 articles published by The Apopka Voice in 2017 that were among the most noteworthy. We will post all of them from December 26th and December 31st. Then on Monday, January 1st we will poll our readers and let them decide which is Apopka’s biggest story of 2017.Story #5: Richard Anderson vs. the State of Florida and the City of ApopkaFirst published on April 11th, 2017State Attorney drops two felony counts, Anderson sentenced to probationRichard Anderson stood quietly by his attorney Warren Lindsey in a Lake County courtroom Tuesday morning and listened as Circuit Court Judge Lawrence Semento read his plea agreement into the record. It was a sentence that did not please Micheal Falcon or his family.Richard AndersonThe Lake County Attorney’s Office charged Anderson with leaving the scene of a crash with serious bodily injury, leaving the scene of a crash with property damage, reckless driving with serious bodily injury, and reckless driving with property damage. All of the charges are third-degree felonies, which in Florida has a maximum punishment of five years in prison, five years probation, and a $5,000 fine per count. However, the State dropped two of those charges – reckless driving with serious bodily injury and reckless driving with property damage because they could not prove Anderson was driving his vehicle at the time of the crash.According to the agreement, Anderson pled no contest (nolo contendre) to leaving the scene of a crash with serious bodily injury and leaving the scene of a crash with property damage. Semento sentenced him to three years probation for the first charge and six months probation on the second. Both sentences will run concurrently, and adjudication of guilt was withheld in both charges, which means Anderson will not have a felony record from these charges if he completes his probation successfully. Anderson’s driver’s license was also suspended for three years, but he can apply for reinstatement upon completion of an impact panel or completion of a department-approved driver improvement program. He may also apply for early termination of probation after successful completion of half the period of probation.“It doesn’t seem there was any justice at all,” said Renee Falcon, Falcon’s former wife. “It’s nothing. Probation is nothing. What message does it send to the community?”Despite the inability to prove Anderson was sitting in the driver’s seat at the time of the crash, the State Attorney was able to present a strong case against him leaving the scene of a catastrophic head-on collision.At approximately 1:20 am on April 5th of 2016, Falcon responded to an alarm at his workplace. He got into his 2007 Toyota Corolla and headed towards the Seminole County wastewater treatment facility where he is a supervisor. He turned onto SR46 in Lake County from 46A and shortly after was struck head-on by a 2014 Dodge Ram going 45 miles-per-hour, according to a memo written by Assistant State Attorney Emily Currington.The 2014 Dodge Ram was owned by Richard Anderson, the former City Administrator of Apopka.Anderson’s 2014 Dodge Ram slammed head-on into Falcon’s 2007 Toyota Corolla (pictured in the feature photo). UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The memo also stated that “no one witnessed the accident occur but several passing motorists saw the aftermath of the crash and stopped to render assistance. These witnesses did not see either driver exit their respective vehicle. Falcon was located on the side of the road near the entrance to Rock Springs Run State Reserve. A white male was reported to have been walking around the scene and near the Dodge Ram truck. The white male later left the scene without speaking to law enforcement.”Also from Curington’s memo were FHP’s interviews with witnesses at the scene of the crash.FHP Trooper Gregory Reed of the Florida Highway Patrol responded to the crash scene and conducted the initial investigation. Reed found the driver’s door of the Dodge Ram to be open when he arrived. A firearm was in the driver’s door pocket in plain view. Reed seized the firearm and placed it into evidence. He then arranged for the vehicles to be towed from the scene.FHP Trooper Joshua Evans conducted the investigation into the hit and run portion of the crash. Evans met with the three witnesses who stopped to render aid after the crash. Janae Okonewski was on her way home from work as a server at Gator’s Dockside in Lake Mary. She had a first aid kit in her vehicle and stopped to help Falcon. Okonewski said she saw a white male standing near the Dodge Ram. She described him as being between the door and the interior of the truck on the driver’s side, reaching into the vehicle. Okonewski positively identified Richard Anderson in a photo lineup as the person she saw outside the Dodge Ram.Evans interviewed Edwin Vasquez. Vasquez said he called 911 to report the crash. He said while he was on the phone with them, an older white male approached him. He described the male as “an older white male with white hair and a facial scrub who resembled Colonel Sanders”. Evans interviewed Matthew Moore, who arrived at the crash scene shortly after the crash occurred. Moore said he saw a man standing by the open driver’s door of the Dodge Ram. Moore said while he was on the phone with 911 the male approached him and asked, “What road is this?” Moore identified Richard Anderson in a photo lineup as the person he saw standing between the open driver’s door and the body of the Dodge Ram.Evans interviewed Matthew Moore, who arrived at the crash scene shortly after the crash occurred. Moore said he saw a man standing by the open driver’s door of the Dodge Ram. Moore said while he was on the phone with 911 the male approached him and asked, “What road is this?” Moore identified Richard Anderson in a photo lineup as the person he saw standing between the open driver’s door and the body of the Dodge Ram.Phone records also indicated that Anderson placed 10 calls shortly after the crash (between 1:25 am and 1:57 am on April 5, 2016). The majority of the calls were placed to attorneys Nicole Guillet and Frank Kruppenbacher. Both have claimed attorney-client privilege as it pertains to the content of any conversation with Anderson. Anderson did not make a 911 call after the crash, according to phone records.Guillet worked with Anderson in Apopka as deputy chief administrative officer and community development director for the city of Apopka while Anderson was City Administrator. She is currently the County Manager of Seminole County.Kruppenbacher is a lawyer with Morgan and Morgan, who was the Apopka City Attorney while Anderson was City Administrator.According to Currington’s memo, the State’s reason for accepting the plea was that accident reconstruction expert Christopher Stewart concluded there were two people in Anderson’s truck at the time of the crash. Currington writes:“On March 17, 2017, the deposition of Christopher Stewart, listed by the defense as an expert witness, was conducted. Stewart is an engineer with extensive training in accident reconstruction. Stewart testified that in October 2016 he examined the Dodge Ram truck at a salvage yard in Sanford. He conducted a visual inspection of the vehicle and downloaded the data contained on the event data recorder in the vehicle. Stewart concluded that both front seats of the Ram were occupied at the time of the crash. Airbags and knee bolsters on both the driver and passenger sides of the vehicles deployed. The seat belts pretensions on both sides of the vehicle were engaged, which is indicative that both seats were occupied at the time of the crash. The glove compartment was broken apart and separated from the dashboard, which is indicative of an impact. The windshield on the passenger side of the vehicle is broken. Stewart also concluded the Ram was traveling westbound in the eastbound lane of travel. He testified the point of impact was completely across the center line when it struck the Corolla at approximately 45 miles per hour.”Because of Stewart’s testimony, Currington says the State could not prove Anderson was behind the wheel.“The State is unable to rebut the testimony of Christopher Stewart that there was a passenger in the vehicle at the time of the crash,” she writes. “There were no witnesses to the crash, and none of the motorists who stopped shortly after the crash saw Anderson behind the wheel of the Dodge Ram. Accordingly, the State is unable to prove beyond and to the exclusion of every reasonable doubt Anderson was driving the Dodge Ram at the time of the crash. The State is unable to rebut a reasonable hypothesis of innocence that Anderson was not the driver but rather the passenger in his truck at the time of the crash. Thus there is no factual basis for the crimes of Reckless Driving Causing Serious Bodily Injury and Reckless Driving Causing Property Damage. Accordingly, a nolle prosequi will be filed as to Counts II and IV of the Information.”Currington also stated that investigators from the Florida Highway Patrol took no photos of the vehicles at any point after the crash, did not examine the event data recorder, and did not collect or submit DNA analysis from the airbags.Before the verdict was read, two of Falcon’s six children asked the court to give Anderson a harsh sentence.Falcon’s daughter, Heather, 24, read a statement on behalf of the family that described the injuries her father suffered, which included a concussion, a punctured lung, a fractured sternum, three herniated discs, a broken hand and two broken wrists.“He (Falcon) pried himself from his car in pain,” she said. “In fear, he would die on the highway… while Anderson paced on the phone near his truck. It was cruel and the fact that Anderson was a licensed paramedic was an extra slap in the face. Mr. Anderson’s actions should not be taken lightly. It’s should not be okay to leave the scene of an accident.”Amber Falcon, 17, echoed her sister’s thoughts.“As my father lay bleeding on the ground he (Anderson) walked away – a trained paramedic. The anniversary of this tragic event has passed, but not the memories. I pray Anderson has reflected on his actions. People are watching. I ask today that Anderson be punished.”An open letter to Richard Anderson: For the sake of Apopka, put this case behind youOpinionBy Reggie Connell/ Managing Editor of The Apopka VoiceFirst published July 22nd, 2017In the early morning hours of April 5th, Richard Anderson changed a lot of lives. When his Dodge Ram crossed the center line on SR46 and crashed into Michael Falcon’s Toyota, the former City Administrator took the Apopka community on one of the darkest journeys in its history.This story has been a chronic malignancy in the Apopka news cycle for over 15 months now. It’s a story writers don’t like writing. It’s an issue the City Council doesn’t want to deliberate. It’s a case the Lake County State Attorney, and the Florida Highway Patrol would like to put behind them. It’s a subject the residents of Apopka don’t want to talk about.And now it’s time for it to end. It’s  time for this tragic, unthinkable, unending saga to conclude, and I’m calling on you, Mr. Anderson, to drop this lawsuit.I don’t know how much money you have made in Apopka, but I suspect you are approaching seven figures after a long career as a paramedic, fire chief, city administrator, consultant, and lobbyist. I was not the Managing Editor of The Apopka Voice when you were city administrator, but I am told by people who knew you that you did a good job. I take them at their word and have no reason to believe you didn’t love Apopka with the passion I am told you did.If that is the case, if you truly love Apopka, then I urge you to end this polarizing issue and let Apopka heal. Forego the trial. Nothing good can come from it.Count your blessings, sir. You were involved in a head-on collision.  The person your pickup crashed into was seriously injured and airlifted to ORMC.  Three 911 calls were made on his behalf.  None were from you Mr. Anderson, despite making several calls shortly after the collision, but at least you were able to walk away relatively uninjured.Some might classify that as a miracle.A year later the Lake County State Attorney agreed to a shocking plea agreement that sentenced you to three years probation on the charge of leaving the scene of a crash involving injury, and six months probation on the charge of leaving the scene of an accident. Two other charges – reckless driving causing serious bodily injury, and reckless driving with bodily damage were dropped because the prosecutors claimed the Florida Highway Patrol was unable to prove you drove the vehicle. Considering the maximum penalty for those charges was five years in prison, five years probation, and a $5,000 fine per count, everyone can agree it was an extremely lenient sentence.The Apopka City Commission voted 3-2 Wednesday to reject your $60,000 settlement agreement. And with that split decision comes a polarized Apopka.Mayor Joe Kilsheimer gave no opinion in the discussion except to read from a prepared statement that shows his hope for a fast conclusion to this matter.“Earlier in the case, we proposed that both sides walk away from the litigation with no money changing hands. At mediation, the choice became this… decide on my own to take the case to trial or bring a settlement agreement back to this council. After some interaction, it became clear that I could not substitute my judgment for the Council’s judgment. With regards to whether the city should continue this litigation is, in my opinion, better to express the will of the community through this City Council rather than my judgment alone. With regards to this amount, this is the lowest amount to which the other side would agree.”Commissioner Doug Bankson took a pragmatic approach that few could disagree with.“Haven’t we already suffered and are we just extending something that only further hurts our city for personal vindictiveness? We’ve all sat through all these budget hearings. Looking at the financial side, it does have ramifications as well because it affects what we can do for our city and citizens.”Commissioner Kyle Becker also took an approach few could disagree with.“My litmus test, the first thing I’m asking myself is right versus wrong. For that reason, I’m willing to risk dollars if it means we’re doing the right thing to protect the integrity of the people of this town who entrust people like Mr. Anderson. That’s where my stance is and I really don’t think I’m budging on this one.”It’s simply wrong to pay you a settlement when the fault lies with you, Mr. Anderson. With all due respect, you were convicted of two felonies, nearly killed a person, watched as less qualified passers-by came to his aid while you made 10-plus phone calls, and walked away. If the mayor, any member of the City Council, or any department head of the City of Apopka had committed those acts, they would have resigned or been fired. They would not have counter-sued the city, and most of them make a lot less money than you did.I would also draw from the wisdom of Commissioner Bankson…“Haven’t we already suffered and are we just extending something that only further hurts our city for personal vindictiveness?”I would ask Bankson’s question of you, sir. What is the motivation for extending this case? If vindictiveness plays a part in this case, please rise above it, Mr. Anderson.For the sake of Apopka forego this lawsuit. Do not put this city through another trauma. Allow your final action in this matter to be a selfless act. TAGSRichard Anderson Previous articleThe Apopka news year in review: Apopka Hop Pale Ale makes its debutNext articleThe Apopka news year in review: UCF Business Incubator Apopka turns 5 Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Anderson’s 2014 Dodge Ram slammed head-on into Falcon’s 2007 Toyota Corolla (pictured in the feature photo). Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! 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Faster sales loom as Land Registry green lights electronic signatures

first_imgThe Land Registry has given the green light to faster property sales after making the historic announcement that it is to accept electronic signatures across a wide range of property transactions.This includes for property sales, leases, mortgages and other property dealings.Talked about for years, the tech has been brought forward by the needs of Covid and social distancing, the organisation says.Electronic signatures will have to be ‘witnessed’ by someone present at the time it takes place, and the process requires a conveyancer to upload the deed or lease to an online platform which sends a link to the signatories.Once they have completed the necessary authentication checks, they then ‘sign’ the document electronically in the physical presence of the witness who then also signs.The conveyancer is then notified that the signing process has been concluded and, once they have completed on the deed, submits the completed document to HM Land Registry with their application for registration.Strict requirement“What we have done today is remove the last strict requirement to print and sign a paper document in a home buying or other property transaction,” says Simon Hayes, Chief Land Registrar.“This should help right now while lots of us are working at home, but it is also a keystone of a truly digital, secure and more efficient conveyancing process that we believe is well within reach.”Adam Forshaw (left), MD at leading tech-driven conveyancers, O’Neill Patient, says: “his is a significant step forward for homebuyers, as it means that in principle the entire homebuying journey can now be conducted electronically.“Even before the advent of Covid-19 and social distancing, there was significant demand for a more tech-driven process.  But one of the biggest problems facing the property sector in lockdown was the ongoing requirement for ‘wet-ink’ signatures.”Read more about electronic signatures.adam forshaw O’Neill Patient Simon Hayes covid Land Registry July 28, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 29th July 2020 at 7:57 amSlowly, slowly the wheel of change moves, Covid-19 has awoken all to the fact that digital is all, and the efficiency it brings is second to none. Yesterday co-incidentally, I was going online and reading through legal publications / digital blogs, Todays Conveyancer, Inside Conveyancing, Legal Futures, Law Gazette etc, all had articles on the end of ‘wet ink’ signatures, but I was struck by how antiquated and closed up the legal industry still is.There were debates about how safe it was to move away from pen and paper, the dangers of identity theft caused by digital, it was for me very disappointing, and I think this sector is about to be hit by a tidal wave of problems as it is so entrenched on ‘doing things’ slowly.Luckily, the click click, I want it now movement the maturing 26 year old plus Gen-Z will just push this old school mentality aside, hunting out digitally good legal practices who have invested and modernised.After all a digital signature at land registry at the end of a conveyancing matter is all well and good, but if the sale took three months to go through as the solicitor or conveyancer works in an office reminiscent of days gone by, then progress will remain slow. Time for some joined up thinking and action.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Faster sales loom as Land Registry green lights electronic signatures previous nextProptechFaster sales loom as Land Registry green lights electronic signaturesLand Registry says needs of Covid led it to take historic decision to bring forward electronic signatures for a wide range of different property transactions.Nigel Lewis28th July 20201 Comment1,364 Viewslast_img read more

U.S. Assists Peruvian Military in Its Counter-Narcotics Fight

first_img“With the combat experience we’ve been through, we taught them how to control a hemorrhage – things that are going to save lives,” Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Clarence Perry told the Marine Corps Times. “They deal with infection because of the jungle environment, so they wanted to know how they can use plants from the grounds around them.” “They don’t always have litters to carry their patients so they taught us some carries and how to use uniforms to improvise and get your partners back to the safe zone,” Perry said. The drills focused on the best ways to combat narco-traffickers and organized crime groups – for example, on how to detect and dismantle improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which drug traffickers often use to target security forces. They trained in the mountainous region of Oxapampa, home to jungles that are similar to the landscape of the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM). There, farmers who work for drug trafficking organization manufacture about 200 tons of cocaine annually, making it the largest cocaine-producing region in the world. That’s where Peruvian Marines and Commandos who engaged in the training will be deployed. “With the combat experience we’ve been through, we taught them how to control a hemorrhage – things that are going to save lives,” Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Clarence Perry told the Marine Corps Times. “They deal with infection because of the jungle environment, so they wanted to know how they can use plants from the grounds around them.” Peru recently announced that, as of the end of November, it has destroyed a national-record 30,349 hectares of coca crops – the main ingredient used to make cocaine. Peru has already exceeded the federal government’s goal of eradicating 30,000 hectares in 2014, Interior Minister Daniel Urresti told the Peruvian daily La República. That achievement prevented 233,000 kilograms of cocaine from reaching the streets. “I encourage Peru to sustain this effort to reduce coca and maintain social assistance in the areas where it is grown,” the UN leader said following a meeting with Peruvian officials at the government palace in Lima. U.S. Staff Sgt. Edgar Alvarado, one of the training instructors who just returned from Villa Rica, praised the Peruvian Marines for their innovation. By Dialogo December 15, 2014 In 2013, Peruvian law enforcement and security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012. The drills focused on the best ways to combat narco-traffickers and organized crime groups – for example, on how to detect and dismantle improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which drug traffickers often use to target security forces. They trained in the mountainous region of Oxapampa, home to jungles that are similar to the landscape of the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM). There, farmers who work for drug trafficking organization manufacture about 200 tons of cocaine annually, making it the largest cocaine-producing region in the world. That’s where Peruvian Marines and Commandos who engaged in the training will be deployed. “They don’t always have litters to carry their patients so they taught us some carries and how to use uniforms to improvise and get your partners back to the safe zone,” Perry said. In September, U.S. Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly, commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), visited the VRAEM to discuss cooperative efforts with Peruvian military leaders. That same month, U.S. Marines with the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-South trained Peruvian Marines on how to administer life-saving techniques to help those injured by IEDs. United Nations praises Peru for its progress fighting narco-trafficking United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki- moon recently praised Peruvian President Ollanta Humala for the progress his administration has made in the fight against narco-trafficking. In September, U.S. Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly, commander of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), visited the VRAEM to discuss cooperative efforts with Peruvian military leaders. That same month, U.S. Marines with the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-South trained Peruvian Marines on how to administer life-saving techniques to help those injured by IEDs. Peru recently hosted a small U.S. Marines Corps security cooperation team, who engaged in joint training exercises with 150 Peruvian Marines and 50 Peruvian Commandos. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki- moon recently praised Peruvian President Ollanta Humala for the progress his administration has made in the fight against narco-trafficking. U.S. Marines trained their Peruvian counterparts on how to identify and destroy the IEDs and booby traps they’re likely to find during deployments. Drug traffickers often place IEDs on established routes used by Peruvian Marines to reach the VRAEM, forcing them to create new routes by using machetes to hack through dense jungle terrain. Shining Path terrorists also operate in the VRAEM, paying and forcing farmers to grow illegal coca crops. It uses money from cocaine trafficking to fund its illegal activities, sometimes in alliances with organized crime groups. About 600 Peruvian Marines are deployed in the VRAEM. Admiral Luis De La Flor Rivero, the commandant of the Peruvian Marine Corps, said he wants to increase the number of Peruvian Marines from 3,500 to 6,000. U.S. Staff Sgt. Edgar Alvarado, one of the training instructors who just returned from Villa Rica, praised the Peruvian Marines for their innovation. Shining Path terrorists also operate in the VRAEM, paying and forcing farmers to grow illegal coca crops. It uses money from cocaine trafficking to fund its illegal activities, sometimes in alliances with organized crime groups. Peru recently announced that, as of the end of November, it has destroyed a national-record 30,349 hectares of coca crops – the main ingredient used to make cocaine. Peru has already exceeded the federal government’s goal of eradicating 30,000 hectares in 2014, Interior Minister Daniel Urresti told the Peruvian daily La República. That achievement prevented 233,000 kilograms of cocaine from reaching the streets. Peru recently hosted a small U.S. Marines Corps security cooperation team, who engaged in joint training exercises with 150 Peruvian Marines and 50 Peruvian Commandos. U.S. Marines trained their Peruvian counterparts on how to identify and destroy the IEDs and booby traps they’re likely to find during deployments. Drug traffickers often place IEDs on established routes used by Peruvian Marines to reach the VRAEM, forcing them to create new routes by using machetes to hack through dense jungle terrain. About 600 Peruvian Marines are deployed in the VRAEM. Admiral Luis De La Flor Rivero, the commandant of the Peruvian Marine Corps, said he wants to increase the number of Peruvian Marines from 3,500 to 6,000. “What better way to do it than by joining the experiences our Marines face in the VRAEM with what [U.S.] Marines experienced in their conflicts,” he told the Marine Corps Times. “What better way to do it than by joining the experiences our Marines face in the VRAEM with what [U.S.] Marines experienced in their conflicts,” he told the Marine Corps Times. The Peruvians wanted to learn how they could use their standard equipment to save the wounded. United Nations praises Peru for its progress fighting narco-trafficking The Peruvians wanted to learn how they could use their standard equipment to save the wounded. “I encourage Peru to sustain this effort to reduce coca and maintain social assistance in the areas where it is grown,” the UN leader said following a meeting with Peruvian officials at the government palace in Lima. In 2013, Peruvian law enforcement and security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012.last_img read more

Will credit union auto lending shift gears in 2018?

first_imgCredit unions continue to see strong gains in auto lending, but tried-and-true tactics may need a tune-up in the year ahead.According to Bob Child, chief operating officer at CU Direct, a “softening” of used car market values – along with increased usage of ride-hailing services and the continuing need for CUs to accelerate decisioning in the auto lending space – may pose a challenge for credit union auto lenders in 2018.Similarly, Karen DeSalvo, chief marketing officer at Truliant Federal Credit Union, a $2.2 billion institution based in Winston-Salem, N.C., said while she expects CUs to continue to increase market share in the year ahead, it may be at a slower rate than seen during the past two years. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

With H1N1 resistance, CDC changes advice on flu drugs

first_imgDec 19, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Increased resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the leading influenza drug, has prompted federal health officials to change their advice about flu treatment, saying clinicians for now should consider using zanamivir (Relenza) or a combination of two drugs for patients suspected of having influenza A.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today said 49 of 50 influenza A/H1N1 viruses tested so far this season have shown resistance to oseltamivir. But all the isolates remained sensitive to zanamivir and to the two older flu drugs, amantadine and rimantadine.H1N1 is one of the three viral types and subtypes included in season flu vaccine; the others are A/H3N2 and B.”When influenza A (H1N1) virus infection or exposure is suspected, zanamivir or a combination of oseltamivir and rimantadine are more appropriate options than oseltamivir,” the CDC said in today’s advisory. “Local influenza surveillance data and laboratory testing can help with physician decision-making regarding the choice of antiviral agents for their patients.”But Dr. Anthony Fiore, a medical epidemiologist in the CDC’s Influenza Division, said rapid flu tests don’t identify the viral subtype, and many areas don’t have good flu surveillance data. “This problem really does complicate deciding what kind of antiviral to use,” he told CIDRAP News.At the same time, he said US flu activity remains low so far this season, and the resistant H1N1 viruses seem no more virulent than susceptible ones. In its weekly surveillance update today, the CDC said 3 states have reported local flu activity, while 36 states have reported only sporadic cases. Another 11 states have reported no flu cases yet.The CDC said vaccination should continue as the primary method for preventing the flu, as the oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses are antigenically similar to the H1N1 strain in this year’s vaccine.Resistance emerged last seasonSince January 2006, oseltamivir and zanamivir have been the only antivirals recommended for flu in the United States. At that point the CDC advised clinicians to stop using amantadine and rimantadine, known as the adamantanes, because H3N2 viruses had become highly resistant to them. Today’s interim guidance puts the adamantanes back in the recommendations.Significant H1N1 resistance to oseltamivir emerged in the United States and a number of other northern hemisphere countries during the 2007-08 flu season. Overall, 10.9% of tested H1N1 viruses in this country showed resistance, according to the CDC.But resistance rose to nearly 100% in some southern hemisphere countries, particularly Australia and South Africa, in their 2008 season, said Fiore.The CDC’s new interim recommendations for healthcare providers include the following:Review local or state flu virus surveillance data weekly to determine which types and subtypes are circulating.Consider using rapid tests that can distinguish types A and B. Fiore said some rapid tests can do this, but others can’t.Patients who test positive for type B can be given either oseltamivir or zanamivir if treatment is indicated.If a patient tests positive for type A, zanamivir should be considered if treatment is indicated. Oseltamivir should be used alone only if local surveillance data suggest that circulating viruses are likely to be A/H3N2 or B. A combination of oseltamivir and rimantadine is an acceptable alternative, and may be necessary for patients who can’t take zanamivir, which is taken by inhalation and is not licensed for children younger than 7 years. Amantadine can replace rimantadine if the latter is not available.If a patient tests negative on a rapid flu test, clinicians should still consider treatment, depending on local flu activity and clinical signs and symptoms. (Fiore said rapid tests are not very sensitive and work better in children than adults.) If treatment is indicated, zanamivir or a combination of oseltamivir and rimantadine should be considered.Where available, testing for viral subtypes can guide treatment. For patients with an H3N2 or B virus, either oseltamivir or zanamivir can be used; for an H1N1 infection, zanamivir or the combination of oseltamivir and rimantadine can be used.What pushed the CDC to make the new recommendations, said Fiore, was the high level of resistance in the H1N1 viruses tested, plus the fact that most of the viruses tested so far this season have been H1N1.The latter factor could easily change, he said. “Last season at this time, H1N1 was the most common [subtype], but a month later they were a distant third place. That could happen again. So these are interim guidelines, and one hope we have is that clinicians will recognize that things are a little complicated this year and keep track of the recommendations that come out.”Fiore said polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests that can identify flu subtypes are now available, but their use is mostly limited to specialty labs, such as state health departments. Once samples arrive at the lab, the tests take a couple of hours. “So if you were going to wait to decide therapy, you’re going to end up with a pretty substantial delay,” he said.Also, he said many areas don’t have good local flu surveillance data. “That advice to look at local data is probably not going to be useful in a lot of areas,” he commented.On the other hand, he noted, “We don’t have much flu activity of any kind right now. . . . And things could continue to evolve and change.”He added, “The fact is that most people don’t get antiviral treatment in the first place. And the resistant viruses are not any more dangerous or virulent, so the person is not going to know if they have resistant flu.”Experts air practical concernsKristine Moore, MD, MPH, medical director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, which publishes CIDRAP News, said she’s not surprised by the sudden spike in antiviral resistance in this year’s circulating H1N1 strain. She said influenza A viruses have a strong tendency to mutate rapidly, and that increasing use of oseltamivir has placed more selective pressure on the virus.The quick emergence of antiviral resistance and the CDC’s revised treatment recommendation have important implications for pandemic flu planning, Moore said. A rapid change affecting treatment could happen in a pandemic influenza strain. “This teaches us not to rely on any one strategy,” she said.William Schaffner, MD, chairman the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, told CIDRAP News that healthcare providers expect a little disconcerting news each flu season. “But we got the prize in the Cracker Jack box early this year,” he said.If physicians need to prescribe treatment for some of their patients who have influenza, they’re going to have to get a sense of what strains are circulating in their area, which will be a change for many practitioners.Schaffner advises physicians to use the rapid test to guide treatment. Patients who have the B strain will still benefit from oseltamivir treatment.Though the CDC recommends zanamivir as an option for treating patients who have A strains, Schaffner said many physicians aren’t as familiar with teaching patients how to use the inhaler. “Pharmacists are going to be very helpful,” he said.Some experts questioned if physicians will have enough information about what influenza subtypes are circulating in their area. Kristen Ehresmann, RN, MPH, manager of immunization, tuberculosis, and international health at the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) in St. Paul, told CIDRAP News that many state public health laboratories have the reagents used to distinguish influenza subtypes.However, she said getting a timely picture of the circulating strains will be a challenge. Though most public health labs easily handle sentinel surveillance samples, they have a more limited ability to process randomly submitted samples.”Every state’s resources are different,” Ehresmann said, adding that the MDH uses a weekly e-mail listserv to update clinicians on the status of circulating influenza strains.Schaffner said he contacted Vanderbilt’s virus lab today and asked if they could start subtyping the influenza A strains and communicating the results to Tennessee’s health department and the general medical community.”This is new for the labs, but there is an urgency for this information,” he said. “Doctors will have to learn how to keep up with information about the circulating strains.”The experts who spoke with CIDRAP News said they were concerned about the nation’s supply of zanamivir, given the CDC’s revised antiviral recommendations. Moore said even if the supply seems adequate, some regions of the country may still experience shortages.However, GlaxoSmithKline, the maker of zanamivir, said today in a press release that it has sufficient supplies to meet the needs of the 2008-09 influenza season and that pharmacies can get the medicine from their wholesalers.Moore and Schaffner both expressed concerns about the combination (oseltamivir and rimantadine) therapy alternative recommended for patients who can’t take zanamivir. “It’s a reasonable recommendation, but its efficacy and safety have never been demonstrated in humans,” Moore said.Added impetus to vaccinateA silver lining in the CDC’s antiviral resistance warnings and treatment recommendations is that they strengthen the rationale for seasonal flu vaccination, the experts said. “These events speak to the value of vaccination and not counting on being able to treat influenza after the fact,” Ehresmann said.Schaffner, who is also president-elect of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, said vaccine supplies are abundant this year, and an examination of early viral isolates suggests that the vaccine is a good match with the circulating strains.This year so far looks like a typical flu season, and activity usually peaks in February, he said, “so there’s still time to be protected by getting the vaccine through December and into January.”See also:CDC interim antiviral guidance for 2008-2009CDC weekly flu surveillance updatelast_img read more

Girls soccer Warriors, Northstars continue struggles

first_imgC-NS would get its own match against F-M 24 hours later, and it would prove even more lopsided as the Hornets had four goals by halftime and kept on going until it had beat the Northstars 7-0.The tough part for C-NS was figuring out which Hornets forward to contain. It couldn’t focus on Knych, who still had one goal and one assist, since Hodge and Lauren Clark both had two goals. TenEyck and Lindsay Coleman also found the net.Now Liverpool had to turn around and face Baldwinsville on Thursday night. When they first met, Hannah Mimas scored four straight goals in the second half to break up a scoreless duel as B’ville eventually prevailed 5-1. Overall, the Warriors did a better job on the defensive side in the rematch at Pelcher-Arcaro Stadium, but still lost, 2-0, twice victimized by Mimas, who converted off a feed from Simone Neivel late in the first half and then did so again midway through the second half, redirecting Neivel’s free kick.Then, in Saturday’s game against Christian Brothers Academy at Alibrandi Stadium, Liverpool played a scoreless first half and then converted in the second half thanks to Abby Brancato’s goal.Yet it still wasn’t enough as the Brothers prevailed 2-1, overcoming Burns’ four saves thanks to a pair of goals by Kennedy Paciaga as CBA netminder Emily Jones recorded seven saves.Meanwhile, C-NS was at Chittenango, who had started 7-0 before taking defeats to Westhill and Marcellus earlier in the week. And the Northstars would continue the Bears’ slide, prevailing by a 3-2 margin.Constant pressure forced Chittenango goalie Cassidy Kelly to make 20 saves. But C-NS saw Madelyn Jackson put in a pair of goals, with Juliana Marullo also finding the net, to offset goals by the Bears’ Madison Wagner and Sarah Martin.After a game Sunday against Athens (Pennsylvania), C-NS would have tests at Baldwinsville and Marcellus this week as Liverpool goes to West Genesee Saturday and hosts Rome Free Academy on Saturday. After a crowded week of girls soccer that included Cicero-North Syracuse defeating Liverpool head-to-head Sept. 19 at Archie Hall Stadium, things got a bit less crowded.The Warriors were back in action last Tuesday night, hosting defending sectional Class AA champion Fayetteville-Manlius, and could not contain the Hornets’ Hannah Knych in a 4-0 defeat.Three times, Knych found the net to earn a hat trick. Morgan Goodman had the other goal, with assists credited to Anna Hartzheim, Chloe Hodge, Sophia TenEyck and Lauren Farrella. Liverpool goalie Mikayla Perry finished with 10 saves. Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Tags: C-NSgirls soccerliverpoollast_img read more

Lakers’ Brandon Ingram credits improved shooting to consistent work habits

first_imgEL SEGUNDO >> The reason seems as simple as Brandon Ingram’s mannerisms. As he experienced shooting slumps, the Lakers rookie forward worked in extra shooting sessions before practice and before games with assistant coach Brian Keefe. Ingram has also visited the Lakers practice facility late at night. During that time, the Lakers offered a similar message.“You’re not working for right now; you’re working for the future,” Ingram said of that message. “‘Everything we’re doing now will help in the long run.” Ingram still has shown some passiveness. After shooting an air ball in Tuesday’s loss to Denver, Ingram passed up a few open looks shortly afterward. “I did mess up on not taking those open shots. But shooters keep shooting,” Ingram said. “I definitely need to keep shooting and trusting myself. My teammates and coaches are definitely telling me to stay with it.” Injury updateAny movement forward Larry Nance Jr. made on the practice floor represented improvement after missing the past 16 games nursing a bone bruise in his left knee.Despite completing practices on Wednesday and Thursday without any reported setbacks, Nance will not play on Friday against Indiana. The Lakers plan to reevaluate Nance’s knee on Friday evening and provide an update on Saturday for his availability for Sunday’s game in Dallas.“If it was up to me, I wouldn’t have missed any time,” Nance said. “But I’m just happy to be nearing getting back out on the court.”What’s in a name?Whenever the two teammates banter with each other, Nance has often addressed rookie center Ivica Zubac without saying his actual name. That’s because Nance has formulated plenty of nicknames that are deemed too many to count. Nance shared a new one on Twitter by calling Zubac “Zu Alcindor” a play off of the former Lew Alcindor turned Kareem Abdul-Jabbar amid Zubac’s efforts to imitate his sky hook. Nance shared his other favorite nicknames for Zubac, named after Lakers teammates and other NBA players. They include: Kareem Abdul-Zabbar, Zuol Deng, Zulius Randle, Zwight Howard, Zu Williams and Zupac, in reference to late rapper, Tupac. Nance also teased Zubac for contending he did not play one-on-one this week because he was scared. “Isn’t it always a child’s job to talk trash to their dad?” Nance said. “I talk trash to my dad. He hasn’t beaten me. I haven’t beaten my dad. That’s how it goes.” Some of that work has already paid off. The Lakers (15-31) enter Friday’s game against the Indiana Pacers (22-19) at Staples Center with Ingram averaging 11.1 points on 46.8 percent shooting through 10 games this month, a sharp increase from his season average of 8.2 points on a 37.3 percent clip. “If you put in the work, your numbers will get better,” Lakers coach Luke Walton said. “It’s that simple. He continues to put in the work.”Walton has no plans to start Ingram other than for injury and rest purposes. Ingram might start for the second consecutive game since the Lakers listed Luol Deng as questionable with a sprained right wrist. Yet, Ingram has led the Lakers in minutes this season (1,285) and averages a league-leading 27.9 minutes per game among rookies (27.9). While that increased playing time has allowed Ingram to become more comfortable with his shot, it has also correlated with increased efficiency. “It’s been an adjustment with just floating around a little bit and being more aggressive,” Ingram said. “Coach has put me in the right position and I’m trying to thrive through it.” center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Will James Wiseman play for Memphis again? Explaining next steps in NCAA eligibility process

first_imgThe most important element of the action that developed was not that Wiseman was declared ineligible, but that the University of Memphis had begun the process of having him reinstated for competition. That’s how the NCAA eligibility process typically works, but not the course that Memphis followed after receiving a rules interpretation last week that Wiseman was “likely ineligible” because his mother accepted $11,500 in moving expenses from Tigers legend Penny Hardaway.Now the Memphis head men’s basketball coach, Hardaway then was sponsoring the summer basketball club Team Penny and coaching the varsity team at East High. But the NCAA regards Hardaway as a booster of Tigers athletics because he donated $1 million to establish an athletic hall of fame at the school.MORE: Explaining the details of James Wiseman’s eligibility caseBecause of that, the NCAA informed Memphis late last week that Wiseman was “likely ineligible” to compete. Wiseman then filed a suit against the NCAA and requested an injunction that would allow him to continue playing. He got it, then played two games for the Tigers. That case was dropped Thursday as Memphis began the process of seeking reinstatement.So here is what that most likely means for Wiseman’s season:Will James Wiseman play for Memphis again in 2019-20?This is a 99.99 percent certainty. Wiseman did not drop his legal case, and the university its defiance of common NCAA procedure, in order for him to draw a full-year suspension from intercollegiate competition.Wiseman had a fantastic legal team advising him, and if they went along with dropping the case they had to know he would be treated kindly — not just fairly, but kindly — by the NCAA reinstatement process.  How long will NCAA’s process take before he is cleared?We can reasonably assume he’ll miss Friday’s game against Alcorn State, but it’s difficult to say how much time the NCAA reinstatement staff would need to make a ruling. Most of the pertinent facts would seem to be in their hands at this point.James Wiseman will be suspended, right?There isn’t any question about that. The only question is how long it will last. Sometimes, the process drags on and the suspension turns out to be a matter of “time served.” That seems less likely here. The NCAA student-athlete reinstatement committee likely will finish its work after Wiseman has missed a game, maybe two, and it seems certain his suspension will not be for substantially longer than that.Is the NCAA going easy on James Wiseman?The NCAA has a formula most often applied to cases such as these in which an amount like $11,500 would equate to a suspension of 30 percent of the team’s season (plus a reimbursement of the full amount). That would mean Wiseman missing nine games, including crucial contests against Ole Miss, N.C. State and Tennessee.In the announcement that Wiseman had been declared ineligible and immediate reinstatement sought, Memphis said something one does not ordinarily hear in these cases: “The NCAA is fully aware of the unique nature and challenges in this particular case, and the University is confident that the NCAA will render a fair and equitable decision consistent with its mission.”The only “unique” challenge relative to this case that has been made public was the original contention by Wiseman’s legal team that the NCAA was fully aware last spring of the payment from Hardaway to Wiseman’s mother and declared him eligible despite that knowledge. If the headline you read declared something like “James Wiseman declared ineligible,” the media outlet you were following failed you.That is not an accurate reflection of the news coming Thursday from Memphis. That declaration led Wiseman to remain with his first choice, playing at Memphis, as opposed to seeing one of a number of remedies: Requesting eligibility at another Division I program, playing a season in the G League, joining the growing number of young prospects signing in Australia’s NBL or simply arranging a deal like the one that carried Darius Bazley through the winter of 2018-19 on the way to becoming the 23rd overall pick in the NBA Draft.How much will Memphis miss James Wiseman while he sits?That depends largely on how long that continues. The game Friday against Alcorn should not be an issue. Little Rock would be more challenging Tuesday. It’s unlikely Wiseman will play Nov. 23 against Ole Miss. That’s a rivalry game and the Rebels feature All-America candidate Breein Tyree.After that is a visit to Brooklyn to play N.C. State, and the Tigers might really begin to sweat his absence then. They have five high-major games on their schedule before opening competition in the American Conference. They already lost one, Tuesday to Oregon, and if the suspension is even five games, Memphis would be try to pass two more of their biggest tests without their best player.last_img read more

Get Your Short Poem Displayed on Sidewalks for Spring Arts Walk

first_imgFacebook79Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of OlympiaPoet Laureate Amy Solomon-Minarchi and the City of Olympia are seeking submissions of short poems (3-6 lines) to be displayed on city sidewalks during Spring Arts Walk 2017.The featured poems will be “painted” using a water resistant coating so that the poems will become visible when it rains. The poems selected will portray positive messages of art, life and nature.Please submit poems via email to [email protected] with “Writing in the Rain Submission-(your name)” in the title of the e-mail. Deadline for receipt of submissions is Monday, April 10, 2017.For more information about the City of Olympia Poet Laureate Program, please visit olympiawa.gov/poetlaureate.last_img

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Mt. Sentinel Volleyball Campers

first_imgMallard’s Source for sports would like to showcase the contingent in the latest edition of Team of the Week.The squad attending the week long Grade 6-10 camp, coached by veteran Mount Sentinel Volleyball coach Joe Moreira and assistant Maya Mierau, include Jerika Perepolkin, Katie Lisk, Emerson Schmidt, Chloe Zdebiak, Bryce Winters, Maddy Bayoff, Roanne Smith, Leanne, Zarikoff,Kira Stoochnoff, Mary Rose Goodwin, Asia Makortoff, Brynn Belland, Jaylen Rushton, Haley Soukeroff and Katie Berlinger. The athletic season is in high gear as the fall sports capture center stage on the BC High School Sports scene.A few volleyball players got a head start to the season by attending the Mount Sentinel Camp prior to the start of the school season.last_img