BRIEFS

first_imgNY Waterway and Mack Cali invite kids under 12 to the first free Harborside Kids Fest at the air-conditioned Atrium in Harborside, 210 Hudson St., Jersey City, on Saturday Aug. 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This family-friendly event offers sweet treats, contests and demos from a dozen local vendors. Kids under the age of 12 ride free on all NY Waterway ferries through Labor Day, Sept. 3. Kids and parents can enjoy contests from Hudson Play and Capitol Wrestling, a bouncy house from J TaeKwondo and Kickboxing Academy, and dancing demos by the Surati School of Performing Arts. Special $5 per day weekend parking will be available at the staffed parking lot at 195 Hudson St., just steps away from the entrance to the Harborside Atrium. Harborside also is served by the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and NJ TRANSIT buses. For more information, call 1-800-53-FERRY, or visit www.nywaterway.com or www.facebook.com/nywaterway or www.twitter.com/ridetheferry. ×NY Waterway and Mack Cali invite kids under 12 to the first free Harborside Kids Fest at the air-conditioned Atrium in Harborside, 210 Hudson St., Jersey City, on Saturday Aug. 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This family-friendly event offers sweet treats, contests and demos from a dozen local vendors. Kids under the age of 12 ride free on all NY Waterway ferries through Labor Day, Sept. 3. Kids and parents can enjoy contests from Hudson Play and Capitol Wrestling, a bouncy house from J TaeKwondo and Kickboxing Academy, and dancing demos by the Surati School of Performing Arts. Special $5 per day weekend parking will be available at the staffed parking lot at 195 Hudson St., just steps away from the entrance to the Harborside Atrium. Harborside also is served by the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and NJ TRANSIT buses. For more information, call 1-800-53-FERRY, or visit www.nywaterway.com or www.facebook.com/nywaterway or www.twitter.com/ridetheferry. ACLU-NJ includes West New York in lawsuit accusing 12 school districts of anti-immigrant discriminationThe ACLU-NJ has targeted West New York as one 12 school districts statewide, in a lawsuit accusing them of discriminating against immigrants and children of immigrants.In a press release issued Thursday, July 26, the ACLU says the districts require forms of state-issued identification requiring Social Security numbers or valid immigration status as a condition for student enrollment.The suit against West New York uses its online student registration page to back its claims.On the page, the district requests that parents bring either a valid driver’s license, passport, or state ID to their registration appointments.“By requiring a form of identification that is only available to residents who have Social Security numbers or a valid immigration status in order to register a child for a school, the [West New York] school district denies an education to students with parents who are undocumented immigrants,” the lawsuit says. “It also discourages immigrants from attempting to enroll their children in the school district.”Federal law prohibits school districts from requiring students to disclose or document their immigration status. They are also forbidden from making any inquiries of students or parents that could expose undocumented status.center_img Additionally, N.J.A.C. 6A:22-3.3 prohibits barring any students from public elementary and secondary schools on the basis of immigration or visa status.West New York has a large Latin immigrant population. Last year, the West New York Board of education even declared the district a “safe zone” for all school age children, regardless of immigration status.When reached by phone, Superintendent of Schools Clara Brito Herrera said she had forwarded the lawsuit to the school board attorney for review. “We always respect our students and our parents, regardless of their immigration status,” Herrera commented. “We are a high densely populated district with a high number of immigrant students in West New York, including myself. We have never turned away any student for lack of documentation.” 79-year-old man arrested for alleged stabbing near homeless encampmentVerdejo Cruz, 79, of Union City, has been arrested in connection with the alleged stabbing death of an apparently homeless man on July 13 in the area of Third Street and Manhattan Avenue in Union City.Hudson County Prosecutor Esther Suarez said on July 13 at around 7:40 p.m., Union City Police, responding to a report, found a male victim by the makeshift homes near Third Street and Manhattan Avenue. The man, who has not been positively identified, was unresponsive with multiple wounds to his upper torso. He was pronounced dead at Jersey City Medical Center at approximately 8:55 p.m.Cruz, who was located at the scene, has been charged with aggravated manslaughter and weapons charges. Suarez credited the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office Homicide Unit and the Union City Police Department for the arrest.Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office at (201) 915-1345 or leave an anonymous tip on the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office website at http://www.hudsoncountyprosecutorsofficenj.org/homicide-tip/. Union City commissioners backtrack on resolution opposing North Bergen power plantThe Union City Board of Commissioners has rescinded a resolution opposing the proposed $1.8 billion North Bergen natural gas plant, according to city spokeswoman Erin Knoedler. The commissioners originally passed the resolution on July 10, arguing the plant would produce mass greenhouse gas emissions and further complicate north Jersey’s power infrastructure.“We just wanted to give North Bergen the opportunity to properly vet the project fully, before other localities weigh in,” Knoedler said, regarding the turnabout, on Tuesday, July 24. “Also we don’t know what Gov. Phil Murphy will do.”Knoedler was likely referencing Murphy’s uncertainty surrounding the controversial proposal. In May, the governor didn’t take a strong stance when a local reporter asked for his take on the plant. He was confused as to how Jersey would benefit, because all the energy produced by the plant would go to New York City. “I have to admit I always scratch my head when something is being done here that another state will benefit from,” he said. “Beyond that I don’t have an opinion.”North Bergen Liberty Generating, the company behind the proposal, argues that natural gas gives off fewer emissions than coal or oil. They also say that natural gas can create more electricity with smaller land use than renewable options, such as wind or solar power. North Bergen officials are in support, saying the plant would generate hundreds of union jobs and millions in tax revenue for the township.Local environmentalists, however, counter that the plant is a biohazard waiting to happen.“These [officials] will tell you that this is the best deal that we can get, and it’s not,” said Hackensack Riverkeeper Bill Sheehan at a press conference denouncing the plant in May. He was joined by other advocacy groups.But regardless of the opposition, the plan proposal continues to move forward. On June 26, the state DEP issued permits authorizing a gas turbine, two storm water outfall structures, and the installation of the cables under the Hudson River.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers still needs to approve the plan.Surface parking lot improvement program announcedThe West New York Parking Authority (WNYPA) has announced that it will begin a series of construction projects as part of its Surface Parking Lot Improvement Program. The initiative’s goal is to improve the surface conditions of municipal lots throughout the city, including work onpavement reconstruction, improving drainage, replacing damaged guardrails, repairing catch basins, improving lot signals, and restriping lots to accommodate more parking spaces where permitted. During this time, residents, visitors, and business owners of West New York may notice lot closures and changes in traffic patterns during construction periods.WNYPA has selected the following lots to receive upgrades as part of the program: 67th Street parking lot, 66th Street parking lot, 62nd Street parking lot, 59th Street parking lot, 58th Street parking lot, 54th Street parking lot, and 55th Street parking lot. Each lot will be closed for 4-5 days for construction work. Lots closest to public schools will be first to receive this treatment.For more information on the Surface Parking Lot Improvement Program, contact the WNYPA directly by calling (201) 295-1575. Additional resources and information are available at www.wnyparkingauthority.org. Route 495 lane closures start August 10The state DOT is set to close traffic lanes on Route 495, starting Aug. 10, according to a press release. The shutdowns are part of a massive $90.3 million, state-funded rehabilitation project on the Route 495 Bridge.The headaches commence with the closure of the 31st Street ramp from JFK Boulevard to 495 westbound in North Bergen on the 10th. Traffic will be detoured onto Paterson Plank Road. On the 17th, one lane on 495 will be closed 24/7 in both directions. This will severely limit roadway capacity.Work on the span includes repairing and reconstructing the bridge deck, replacing and strengthening its deteriorated structural steel, and repairing and painting the substructure. The project’s first phase began in September of 2017 with local street improvements.The entire project is projected to finish around summer 2021. Motorists are advised to consider alternative routes during that time, such as the George Washington Bridge, Holland Tunnel, public transportation, or carpooling. For more information, email the DOT at [email protected], or call 201-408-8495.HRPAC announces August concertsThe next Wednesday night concerts set for Summer Concerts on the Hudson at Lincoln Harbor Park in Weehawken will be Ranky Tanky, on Aug. 8, and Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, on Aug. 15. Both shows start at 7 p.m.From Charleston, S.C., Ranky Tanky released its first CD in October 2017 and by December, Ranky Tanky had been profiled on NPR’s nationally syndicated radio show, “Fresh Air,” with Terry Gross. The album then soared to the No. 1 position on the Billboard, iTunes, and Amazon Jazz Charts. This group performs Gullah music from the Georgia and Carolina Sea Islands with jazz inspiration and a New Orleans twist.For nearly two decades, the Catskill Mountains hid singer and songwriter Arleigh Kincheloe, until one day she said goodbye to her hometown and moved to New York City to start the hard soul collective, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds. The group has performed more than 700 shows and made their national TV debut on NBC’s “Today Show.” They’ve released three full-length studio albums, including their most recent, the acclaimed “The Weather Below.”These free concerts will take place at Lincoln Harbor Park, located just north of the Chart House restaurant directly on the west bank of the Hudson River in Weehawken, New Jersey. Free parking is available and public transportation, including NJ Transit bus 158 from the Port Authority and Light Rail, will bring concertgoers to Lincoln Harbor. Please use 1700 Harbor Boulevard for GPS directions.For more information including the full summer concert schedule, directions, updates, and rain date info, please check the HRPAC website, www.hrpac.org, or call the concert info line at (201) 716-4540.Union City commissioners backtrack on resolution opposing North Bergen power plantThe Union City Board of Commissioners have rescinded a resolution opposing the proposed $1.8 billion North Bergen natural gas plant, according to city spokeswoman Erin Knoedler. The commissioners originally passed the resolution on July 10, arguing the plant would produce mass greenhouse gas emissions and further complicate north Jersey’s power infrastructure.“We just wanted to give North Bergen the opportunity to properly vet the project fully, before other localities weigh in,” Knoedler said, regarding the turnabout, on Tuesday. “Also we don’t know what Gov. Phil Murphy will do.”Knoedler was likely referencing Murphy’s uncertainty surrounding the controversial proposal. In May, the governor didn’t take a strong stance when a local reporter asked for his take on the plant.He was also confused as to how Jersey would benefit, because all the energy produced by the plant would go to New York City. “I have to admit I always scratch my head when something is being done here that another state will benefit from,” he said. “Beyond that I don’t have an opinion.”North Bergen Liberty Generating, the company behind the proposal, argues that natural gas gives off fewer emissions than coal or oil. They also say that natural gas can create more electricity with smaller land use than renewable options, such as wind or solar power. North Bergen officials are in support, saying the plant would generate hundreds of union jobs and millions in tax revenue for the township.Local environmentalists, however, counter that the plant is a biohazard waiting to happen.“These [officials] will tell you that this is the best deal that we can get, and it’s not,” said Hackensack Riverkeeper Bill Sheehan at a press conference denouncing the plant in May. He was joined by other advocacy groups.But regardless of the opposition, the plan proposal continues to move forward. On June 26, the state DEP issued permits authorizing a gas turbine, two storm water outfall structures, and the installation of the cables under the Hudson River.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers still needs to approve the plan.Roseland launches leasing for RiverHouse 11 at Port ImperialDeveloper Roseland Residential Trust said last week they have started leasing RiverHouse 11 at Port Imperial, the 10-story addition to the ongoing $2-billion, 200-acre Port Imperial waterfront development that runs from Weehawken to Guttenberg.Utlimately it will include 20 upscale residential, retail, and hotel properties.Located at the edge of the Hudson River at 1100 Avenue at Port Imperial in Weehawken, RiverHouse 11 features 295 apartments ranging from studio to three-bedroom residences. Apartment finishes include luxury wood-style plank floors, Moen, Kohler, and Sterling fixtures in kitchens and bathrooms, full-height backsplashes, and private terraces and balconies in select homes.Amenities include a sky terrace with stadium seating, outdoor lounges with fire pit and fireplaces, barbeque grilling stations and a bocce court, a resort-style pool and sundeck, a fitness center with a yoga and spin studio as well as a rock-climbing wall, a business center, conference rooms, and a Wi-Fi café with computer stations in social rooms, a theater room, game room, music room, and golf simulator lounge, crayon corner, a community garden, and 24-hour concierge, emergency maintenance, and package lockers.RiverHouse 11 is convenient to public transportation options including direct ferry service to Manhattan and Light Rail service along the river.Deadline is Sept. 7 for Kennedy Dancers Inner City Youth ScholarshipSept. 7 is the deadline for Kennedy Dancers afterschool scholarships for students ages 13-18 years old. This scholarship provides unlimited dance classes at no cost for up to two years.All applicants must provide proof of residency in the following places: Jersey City, East Newark, Guttenberg, Harrison, Kearny, Weehawken, West New York, and Secaucus. Applicants must also provide a complete ICY intake form, proof of identification (parent and student) and proof of income.Those accepted must purchase a “Dance Essentials” package ($100): Kennedy Dancers shorts, one pair of tan tights, one pair of pink tights, one dance skirt, and one pair of tan jazz shoes. They must also go through a scheduled dance evaluation appointment to determine their skill level.For more information go to http://www.kennedydancers.org/.last_img read more

Ocean City Tabernacle Closes Moorlyn Theatre, Lists it for Sale

first_imgBy Tim KellyOcean City’s historic Moorlyn Theatre, the first and now last movie house on the island, has closed its doors and is listed for sale, its owner confirmed this week.The Moorlyn is one of the oldest businesses in Ocean City and one of the first attractions on the Boardwalk. It began operations in 1901 as Moore’s Bowling Casino, housing a bowling alley and later a roller skating rink, according to the Ocean City Historical Society.The Moorlyn achieved its niche in town history in 1921 when a 200-seat theatre replaced the roller rink. The following year the property was renamed the Moorlyn Theatre, and save several interruptions in between previous ownership changes, it has been showing films ever since.Today however, the iconic property’s future is uncertain. The Ocean City Tabernacle, owner of the property since 2012, has listed it for sale with an asking price of $1.1 million, according to a Tabernacle official.“It wasn’t working out for us,” said Virginia A. Weber, Chair of the Board of Trustees. “We closed it permanently and we’re looking for a buyer.”The Tabernacle had renamed the property the Moorlyn Family Theatre and developed a programming mix of live stage performances, first-run films and classic movies from the theatre’s glory days. Concerts, stage plays, magic and comedy shows were among the live entertainment offerings. In this incarnation, the Moorlyn Family Theatre more closely resembled its original mixed use, which included Vaudeville and concerts.According to Weber, a lack of patronage was not behind the theatre’s closing but rather a full plate of building operations.“We had too many buildings to manage,” she said.Nevertheless, the Moorlyn was not immune to the trend of films being delivered digitally on smart television and handheld devices, which has eroded the number of people willing to go to theatres nationwide.In recent decades three other boardwalk theatres ceased operations showing movies. The Strand, which is now the home of Manco & Manco pizza; the Surf, since reborn as the Surf Mall; and the Village (demolished) left the Moorlyn as the lone remaining place to catch a flick on the boardwalk.Weber said the sale was being handled by the Linwood-based firm, Foresite Commercial Realty and the agent, Samantha Roessler. Efforts to reach Roessler were unsuccessful on Thursday.Earlier in the week prior to confirmation of the closing and pending sale, several people walking the boards waxed nostalgic about the movie palace.“I used to love coming here as a kid,” said “Boone” McCamey, a lifelong Ocean City resident. “I would ride my bike to the movie theatre.  How many kids have that opportunity?  Especially today, it just doesn’t happen.  But I would jump on my bike, grab a slice of pizza and go watch a movie.  It was great.”The Moorlyn marquee as it appears today (photo credit Ocean City Events and Activites on Pinterest)“It’s a shame (so many boardwalk theatres have closed),” said Marilyn Lippincott of Cinnaminson, Burlington County, who was strolling the boards Tuesday in front of the Moorlyn.  “There were (many more theatres) here at one time and you could choose from a wide variety of films. It was especially good on a rainy day when you couldn’t go to the beach.”The first films shown at the Moorlyn were silent movies. An organist provided musical accompaniment.  According to Wikipedia, Hollywood was producing sheet music for use with films and some big city theatres employed entire orchestras for this purpose.By the 1930s, the technology to make movies with sound became widely used and the so-called “talkies” made silent films nearly extinct. The Moorlyn kept pace with the changes and packed in large crowds.A few years earlier, a major fire ripped through the boardwalk, destroying much of it as well as many of the businesses. Somehow the Moorlyn escaped damage.  The boardwalk was then rebuilt atop concrete pilings and relocated a few dozen yards closer to the ocean.  The Moorlyn itself was physically moved.  It was placed on rails and dragged to its present location by horse-drawn teams.Over the next three decades the theatre thrived, bringing great films from Hollywood’s golden age to large audiences of vacationers and residents.However, the 1970s rise of TV made the first big dent in movie audiences. The Moorlyn’s auditorium was made into two theatres and in the 80s into four, according to the website cinematreasurers.org.  Thus, the historic theatre kept pace with an industry-wide trend of multi-screen theatres, also known as multiplexes.  The Moorlyn survived this way for a time, although it closed for several periods in between changes in ownership.Approximately 10 years ago the theatre took on its final structural reconfiguration as storefronts, which now include Kohr Bros., Starbucks and Verizon Wireless were built on the boardwalk side of the building.  The iconic Moorlyn marquee and ticket box office were removed.  A new art deco style marquee inspired by the one it replaced, was installed on the Moorlyn Terrace side.  A residence was added on a second story level above the storefronts.During this period, the facility was owned and operated by the Frank’s Theatres chain, which eventually sold it to the Tabernacle. The Moorlyn Theatre marquee overlooks the Boardwalk in a vintage postcard. last_img read more

Elkhart police searching for suspects in check deception case

first_img Google+ Elkhart police searching for suspects in check deception case By Brooklyne Beatty – September 29, 2020 0 464 TAGScasecheckdeceptionElkhartIndianasuspectsvehicle Facebook Facebook IndianaLocalNews Twitter Pinterestcenter_img WhatsApp Pinterest WhatsApp Google+ Previous articlePolice searching for suspicious vehicle spotted in Three Rivers MondayNext articleWhat you can expect to see and hear during the Presidential debate Brooklyne Beatty (Photo Supplied/Elkhart Police) (Photo Supplied/Elkhart Police)Elkhart police are asking for the public’s help in identifying suspects involved in a recent check deception case.Officers were able to obtain surveillance photos of both the suspects and the vehicle they arrived in.Anyone who recognizes them, or has any information on the incident, is asked to contact Detective Susan Lambright at (574) 389-4736 or email the tip line at [email protected] Twitterlast_img read more