Marlin tourney in full swing

first_imgThe 55th Montego Bay International Marlin Tournament, sponsored by Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum, is in full swing in St James.Six days of activities will conclude tomorrow with the Appleton Estate Raft Up and beach party, from 11 a.m. until dark, at the Doctor’s Cave Beach Hotel in Montego Bay.Yesterday, six Marlin were caught, tagged and released. Earlier in the week, a dolphin and a black fin tuna were among those caught.The final day of fishing is on today, with lines in the water at 7 a.m. and lines out of the water at 4 p.m. The day will end with the Digicel Awards presentation and performances by several stand-up comedians.last_img

Indigenous All Stars Claim Inaugural Match

first_imgThe Indigenous All Stars team created history on Friday, winning the inaugural All Stars Touch Football game by one touchdown, 5-4 at Cbus Stadium.The Indigenous All Stars took an early lead before the TFA All Stars hit back to level the game at 4-all with five minutes remaining. Lachlan Pierce gave his side a one touchdown lead with minutes remaining, before solid defence by the Indigenous All Stars stopped the TFA All Stars from forcing the game into a drop-off, with the Indigenous All Stars taking the match, 5-4. Pierce was recognised for his impressive performance, being awarded the Shane Frederiksen Medal, with Indigenous All Stars teammate, Carly Walsh receiving the Bo De La Cruz Medal. Stay tuned to the TFA social media channels for highlights and photos. To read the www.nrl.com match report, please click on the following link: http://www.nrl.com/indigenous-side-too-slick-for-tfa-all-stars/tabid/10874/newsid/83827/default.aspx To watch a replay of the game, please click on the link below:http://www.nrl.com/live-stream-womens-all-stars-and-more/tabid/10874/newsid/83807/default.aspx Related LinksAll Starslast_img read more

10 months agoWolves captain Coady: We must learn from Liverpool defeat

first_imgWolves captain Coady: We must learn from Liverpool defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves captain Conor Coady says they must learn from defeat to Liverpool.Coady, facing his former club, believes that the clinical manner of the two goals underlines the quality of the Premier League.He said, “They’re top drawer, with their movement and the way that they drag people out of position, so fair play to them, but from our point of view we have to look at the goals and improve, and make sure we’re focusing for the full game.”The first goal is a great finish but we could have stopped that happening by stopping the quick free-kick being taken. However, we’ve switched off there and we’ve switched off when the cross comes in for the second one.”You can’t afford to do that against any team in this league, but they’re at the top of the league and they’re really going to punish you.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Stars Support Montblancs Signature For Good

first_imgSaturday, February 23, 2013 marked the official launch of Montblanc’s Signature For Good Collection with UNICEF, whereby Montblanc hopes to provide children access to quality education.This collection reinforces Montblanc’s long-term commitment to children’s education and UNICEF.To celebrate the launch of the collection, Montblanc hosted a pre-Oscar charity brunch with UNICEF at the Hotel Bel-Air. Academy award winner Hilary Swank made a special appearance to speak about the importance of the initiative and shed light on her recent visit to Ethiopia with Montblanc and UNICEF.For every piece in the Signature For Good Collection sold between March 1, 2013 and March 1, 2014 Montblanc will donate part of its proceeds to raise at least $1.5 million to support the UNICEF education programs worldwide.Additional celebrities who lent their support to the cause and attended the brunch were Emmy Rossum, Rosario Dawson (actress), UNICEF Ambassador Alyssa Milano, Louise Roe, Alan Arkin, Billy Zane, Jesse Metcalfe, Peter Fonda, Jesse Williams, Jane Seymour, Clemens Schick, Rachel Griffiths and many more.Montblanc Signature For Good Collection includes a special edition of writing instruments, jewelry and leather accessories, all of which feature a unique brick design symbolizing the joint effort of building a better future for all children and their communities by improving access to quality education, including the construction of schools – brick by brick. For every piece in the “Signature for Good” Collection sold between 1 March 2013 and 31 March 2014, Montblanc will donate part of its proceeds to raise at least $1.5 million dollars to UNICEF’s education programmes, focusing on the most vulnerable children, through the Schools for Africa and Asia initiatives, and programmes in Latin America.With a heritage deeply rooted in the culture of writing, Montblanc has always been committed to the support of education and literacy. For nearly a decade, Montblanc has taken an active role in supporting UNICEF’s efforts to enable more children to learn how to read and write, with several global initiatives together raising over $5 million dollars to date. With the new “Signature For Good” Collection, Montblanc is building on the success of the first “Signature For Good” initiative launched in 2009 and pledging to raise in 2013 at least $1.5 million dollars.For this special Montblanc “Signature For Good” Collection, the design of the Meisterstuck has been revisited with unique detailing. Available as a Classique Fountain Pen, Rollerball, and Ballpoint Pen and in the bolder LeGrand size, the black precious resin writing instrument features a cap top ring designed with the symbolic rectangular brick pattern. The blue sapphire set in this ring is inspired by UNICEF’s blue colour and the work it accomplishes to improve children’s lives. Other pieces in the collection include handcrafted leather wallets, cardholders, a pen pouch and notebook with blue lining decorated with the symbolic brick design. The leather used by Montblanc for the Signature For Good Collection is Italian full-grain printed calfskin. The distinctive pattern on the leather is a series of diagonal lines. Cuff links with reversible surfaces of onyx and stainless steel, bracelets and key rings, all embellished with a sapphire, make up the jewellery selection.Each writing instrument, leather item and jewellery piece features an individual serial number associated with a “brick,” a reference to the building and running of schools: indicating that the owner of the product has a symbolic share in the programme and is contributing to building better and brighter futures one brick at a time. By registering the number on the product at www.montblanc.com/signatureforgood, the owner of the piece can monitor the progress of the initiative and find out the many ways in which UNICEF is improving educational opportunities for children. Not just by building schools but also by transforming them into a safe and protective place where children can learn and play.Lutz Bethge, CEO Montblanc International explains, “With 61 million children in the world not yet enrolled in school, it is our duty to take the necessary steps to empower these children with an education so they have the knowledge, skills and confidence to shape a better future for themselves and their communities. Our aim was to create a collection that not only appeals through its design, style and fine craftsmanship, but that has a greater purpose by enabling real change.”For UNICEF, the ongoing relationship with Montblanc is a meaningful and important one. As Caryl M. Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF says, “Thanks to our partnership with Montblanc and the vital contribution to UNICEF’s work, UNICEF has provided more children a quality education that will significantly better their chances in life. The impact of their investment is truly noticeable and we are grateful for the contribution they make in raising global awareness for UNICEF’s work with vulnerable children around the world.”last_img read more

John Isner Is All Alone at Wimbledon

At a major international tournament, American men had a very bad day.Yes, the U.S. men’s soccer team did just fine Thursday, losing 0-1 to Germany but advancing to the knockout stage of the World Cup. But at Wimbledon, all but one of the four remaining American men exited the singles draw without winning a set. That leaves just John Isner to play in the third round. Isner is by far the highest-ranked American, but he’s often vulnerable to upsets at events outside the U.S.“I guess it’s better than last year. We didn’t have anybody past the second round,” Isner said of the American men’s success at Wimbledon, at a press conference Thursday. “At least there’s one guy past the second round.”Here’s a sign of how bad things have gotten for American men’s singles tennis: Even with all the early exits, Isner has to win just one more match for this tournament to count as a good Grand Slam by recent low standards. He’d be the lone American man in the fourth round for a second consecutive major, after five consecutive Grand Slams without any American man to make it to the Round of 16. The U.S. hasn’t had a male quarterfinalist at a Grand Slam since Isner and Andy Roddick reached that stage at the 2011 U.S. Open, nor a semifinalist in the five years since Roddick lost in the final at Wimbledon. No American man has won a major since Roddick did at the U.S. Open in 2003, and after every disappointing Grand Slam, the prospect of an American major champ seems farther away than it did at the one before.The situation is very different for the American women. They’re led by world No. 1 and five-time Wimbledon champ Serena Williams, who will be joined in the third round this year by her sister, Venus Williams, who also has won Wimbledon five times. Even more American women are outperforming their male counterparts. Three others have made the third round at Wimbledon, with one more, Victoria Duval — the 18-year-old who got into the tournament the hard way, by qualifying — still to play her second-round match.Isner isn’t an ideal American No. 1. He has a booming serve and one of the worst return games in the top 50. But without him, things would be truly bleak. For the third consecutive major, Isner is the only American man ranked high enough to get one of the 32 seeds. No other American man even ranks in the top 50.Sixteen countries have a No. 2 player ranked higher than the second-best American, No. 67 Sam Querrey, one of the players who lost on Thursday. Among the countries with a higher-ranked No. 2 player are Switzerland, Croatia and Austria, which have a combined population under 21 million — roughly the population of Texas. Three other countries with a population under 20 million have a No. 2 player ranked higher than Querrey. (It’s worth noting that tennis has become more popular globally since the 1980s, hence more countries are competing and leaving fewer spots for the traditional powers.) The strength of the No. 2 player matters, as a proxy for depth of talent and for the Davis Cup, the international team competitions with two singles slots.To Denis Kudla, a 21-year-old American who lost his second-round match here Thursday, international comparisons aren’t fair because of tennis’s relatively slight stature among U.S. sports. “Tennis is our fifth or sixth sport,” he said in an interview last week. “People just have to be patient.”American women fare better in the equivalent international comparison, perhaps partly because female athletes have fewer professional options and tennis is one of the most lucrative. Just two countries have higher-ranked No. 2 players than Sloane Stephens of the U.S.: Serbia and Italy.Strong prior American male generations — John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors; Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras — cast a long shadow over Roddick and his peers, former top-10 members James Blake and Mardy Fish. But the Roddick generation was far stronger than the current one, as demonstrated by the decline in the number of American players in the majors’ draws, of seeded American players and of American players who reach the third round. “I think what happened is, maybe we missed a generation,” Kudla said. “The generation behind Roddick maybe didn’t pan out like it was supposed to.”“Every country goes through a slump,” Benjamin Becker, a German player who played for Baylor University, said in an interview this week. “It’s not easy to always have these prodigies like Agassi, Sampras, McEnroe, [Jim] Courier and Connors. A lot of times, countries take generations off.” He added, “I’m very confident that an American player will be soon at the top level.”Two young Americans who hope to fulfill Becker’s prediction had modest success last week, qualifying for Wimbledon by winning matches on adjacent courts at the Bank of England Sports Centre while monitoring each other’s progress. Ryan Harrison, who was watching Kudla’s match during changeovers of his own contest, said in an interview that in an individual sport, national rankings don’t matter much. “The U.S. is always concerned about how many top players they have,” Harrison said. “The only thing I’m concerned about is my own development, my own career.”He added: “The U.S. has to really understand that we’re working. We’re doing what we can here.” read more

Badgers backs run wild on OSU

The Wisconsin offensive line “did a great job protecting and showing, obviously, the run and then passing,” said defensive lineman Dexter Larimore. “But the bottom line is that our D-line didn’t give enough pressure and we, as a defense, didn’t collaborate on third down and get off the field.” Despite the defensive struggles, both Tressel and Heyward said that Wisconsin hadn’t done anything outside of the ordinary, nothing that they hadn’t prepared for. “If I had to bet (what they did on offense) wasn’t anything too earth-shattering, just excellent execution,” Tressel said. “This was probably a lot of their base package.” OSU special teams continued to give up valuable points when David Gilreath returned the opening kickoff 97 yards for a Badger touchdown. It sparked a horrendous first half for the Buckeyes. With 10 minutes left in the second quarter, OSU held the Badgers from within the 5-yard line for two downs before giving up a 1-yard touchdown to Clay, putting the Badgers up 21-0. After two field goal attempts, the Buckeyes headed to the locker room down 21-3. The defense improved in the second half as the Buckeyes outscored the Badgers by five points, but their efforts were in vain. “To Wisconsin’s credit, when it got to (21-18), they stepped up and kept that 10-point cushion on us the rest of the second half and they came up with the win,” Tressel said. The state of Wisconsin is known for its cheese, but it was Ohio State’s defense on Saturday that looked like a block of Swiss: full of holes for Badger running back John Clay. The senior racked up 104 yards in Saturday’s game, which Wisconsin won 31-18. In last year’s matchup at Ohio Stadium, Clay had 59 yards on 20 carries against the Buckeyes, but after just one quarter in Camp Randall, he had already racked up 71 yards, including a touchdown to put the Badgers up 14-0 early in the game. “Football is a game of execution,” OSU coach Jim Tressel said. “It’s one thing to talk about football, it’s another thing to draw it up on the board, and the big thing is to execute. They executed.” Senior captain and defensive lineman Cameron Heyward attributed Clay’s success in part to the line’s failure to execute defensively. “They did a pretty good job,” Heyward said. “But we didn’t do a good job of executing as well. But you’ve got to tip your hats off to them, they played their butts off.” After giving up 184 total yards on the ground to the Badgers, Heyward took much of the blame. “We have to learn from our mistakes.” Heyward said. “I didn’t perform as well as I wanted to, I take this loss very personally. If there is ever a finger to be pointed it’s at me. As a leader of this defense I think it starts up front and I don’t think we did a good job at all.” The final nail in the defense’s coffin came after quarterback Terrelle Pryor and the Buckeye offense had brought the team within three of the Badgers. Wisconsin had the ball on the OSU 12-yard line and Badgers’ running back James White scored to put Wisconsin up 28-18. read more

A type of semitransparent polymer that can be mended at room temperature

first_imgCredit: Yu Yanagisawa A small team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has created a polymer that can be repaired when broken into two parts by applying a small amount of pressure at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they came upon the polymer, how it was made, and how well it can be repaired. Materials may lead to self-healing smartphones This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Journal information: Science The researchers report that to test the material, they cut a small tile into to two pieces, then pressed the two pieces together into the original configuration using just a small force at room temperature. After 30 seconds, they further report, the healed tile could support a 300-gram weight. They note that pressing the material for longer amounts of times allows for even stronger bonds to form—eventually, after a couple of hours, the material reaches the same degree of bonding as it had prior to being cut or broken.More work will have to be done with the material before it can be used in a smartphone screen, however, such as making it more transparent. More information: Yu Yanagisawa et al. Mechanically robust, readily repairable polymers via tailored noncovalent cross-linking, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aam7588AbstractExpanding the range of healable materials is an important challenge for sustainable societies. Noncrystalline, high molecular weight polymers generally form mechanically robust materials, which, however, are difficult to repair once they are fractured. This is because their polymer chains are heavily entangled and diffuse too sluggishly to unite fractured surfaces within reasonable timescales. Here, we report that low molecular weight polymers, when cross-linked by dense hydrogen bonds, give mechanically robust yet readily repairable materials, despite their extremely slow diffusion dynamics. A key was to utilize thiourea, which anomalously forms a zigzag hydrogen-bonded array that does not induce unfavorable crystallization. Another key was to incorporate a structural element for activating the exchange of hydrogen-bonded pairs, which enables the fractured portions to rejoin readily upon compression. Engineers around the world have been working hard to find a type of glass or plastic that can be healed easily when broken to address the problem of broken screens on phones and other portable devices. While some progress has been made, there still exists a need for something better. In this new effort, the researchers report on a new type of plastic that can be healed by simply pressing the broken pieces back together.As the researchers describe it, a team member was investigating glue properties with polymers when they discovered that one of the polymers under study could mend itself just by pushing the pieces together. Intrigued, the group looked closer. They found that the hydrogen bonds in the polymer formed in a way that did not crystallize, allowing the molecular chains to move freely. This allowed the bonds to re-form easily under just a small amount of pressure. After working with several configurations, the team settled on a polymer called polyether-thioureas (TUEG3)—it offered the best healing properties of those tested. Citation: A type of semi-transparent polymer that can be mended at room temperature using small pressure (2017, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-12-semi-transparent-polymer-room-temperature-small.html © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more