Womens volleyball Buckeyes Sweet Sixteen bound

Members of the Ohio State women’s volleyball team celebrate after scoring against LIU Brooklyn on Sept. 2, 2016. OSU won, 3-0. Credit: Jenna Leinasars | Multimedia EditorThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team upset arguably their most important opponent this season, No. 14 Kansas State on Saturday for a trip to the Sweet Sixteen round of the NCAA tournament. The Buckeyes eliminated the Wildcats in five-sets, 25-20, 25-22, 22-25, 23-25 and 17-15. OSU secured their spot to play in Saturday’s second round by knocking off Missouri State in three sets on Friday, while the Wildcats swept Lipscomb, also on Friday. A pinch of sibling rivalry added to the competitiveness of the evening. OSU senior middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe looked through the net at her younger sister, freshman middle blocker Elle Sandbothe. Before the match, Taylor took to Twitter and expressed her excitement at the opportunity to play “her best friend.” The front row match-up would prove to be a factor during the entire match.The Buckeyes made their presence known from the beginning of the first set. A variety of hitters went to work, which resulted in an early 9-1 run for OSU. As Kansas State closed in on the OSU lead, the arena erupted, showing the home team support for the Wildcats. Sophomore setter Taylor Hughes wrangled in the final two kills of the set to give the Buckeyes the 1-0 advantage. OSU jumped out to an early lead again to start the second set, but the Wildcats weren’t letting the Buckeyes escape without putting up a fight. Kansas State battled to put the score within two points at 14-12, but OSU’s consistency and patience shone through to maintain control of the lead. Elle Sandbothe assisted on a major block for Kansas State, but it was immediately followed by a kill from her sister, Taylor. OSU held a narrow lead at 24-22, but sealed another set victory with a kill by sophomore outside hitter Audra Appold. After the second set, OSU was hitting .225 collectively, compared to Kansas State’s .056. However, it was the Wildcats who came out of the intermission with the momentum on their side. They held onto the lead for the first time in the match to begin the third set as the Buckeyes’ defense and serve reception began to unravel. OSU came back with aggressive swings and gained the lead for the first time in the third set at 15-14 before a back-and-forth battle ensued between the teams. The Wildcats focused on Taylor Sandbothe’s path and another block by her younger sister shifted the energy back to Kansas State. The Wildcats saw their first set point of the match, and the Buckeyes couldn’t counter back. Despite the Wildcat win, OSU still held the advantage 2-1 going into the fourth set. The Kansas State crowd made their voices heard to start the fourth set, cheering after every point that dropped on OSU’s side. The noise was egged on by the point-for-point play that characterized the entire set. When the dust cleared, it was again Kansas State who stole the set victory and forced a sudden-death final set. Errors are critical any five-set contest, and unforced errors by OSU allowed the Wildcats to take the two-point advantage 8-6 before switching sides of the court. The Buckeyes quickly changed their tone and after a handful of nail-biting final points, OSU claimed the crucial win to stay alive in the NCAA tournament. Junior outside hitter Luisa Schirmer combined with Taylor Sandbothe for 36 kills. Sophomore setter Taylor Hughes finished with another triple-double to her name with 14 kills, 41 assists and 15 digs. The Buckeyes are off to the Sweet Sixteen to face Big Ten rival, the Wisconsin Badgers. read more

Get some France in your system Delhi

first_imgAfter a successful stint in 2009, Bonjour India is back with its second edition in India.This three-month event from January to April will take place across the country over 16 cities. Organised by the Embassy of France in India and the Institut Français en Inde, in association with the Alliance Française India and the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), this event is something they have been planning for two years. Speaking at the unveiling of the Bonjour India website, H.E. François Richier, Ambassador of France said: ‘Bonjour India is an invitation to discover and re-discover France through its whole artistic dimension. As a real cultural dialogue between French and Indian artists, Bonjour India shows the friendship that links France and India.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Max Claudet, director, Institut Français en Inde, cultural counsellor French Embassy in India  highlighted the programmes scheduled and also gave an insight into the main purpose behind  the festival.He said: ‘The event will be inaugurated by Luminocity, by light sculptor Patrick Rimoux and Nandita Palchoudhuri in Delhi and Mumbai, also Ballet Preljocaj on the stage designed by Subodh Gupta as part of an exchange between India and France in the field of art, literature, cinema, education, sports, architecture, fashion, photography and performing arts.’ Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe programme will kickoff with contemporary ballet, and then, One thousand years of peace by Bolshoi Theatre, and a grand show by Subodh Gupta, an aerial acrobatic show, Flying Angels, and a multidisciplinary show, Luminocity. In the dance section, there will be urban ballet Ganga, a choreographic piece uniting poetry, music and dance. In the music section, there will be a concert of sarod and symphony orchestra with electronic music. Composer Pierre Thilloy and Avignon Symphony Orchestra will  be in  performance with sarod maestro Ustad Amjad Ali Khan. Pain and Pleasure at the Court of Versailles is a Baroque music presentation by Amarillis ensemble. Christohe Chassol Indiamore and Scratch Bandits crew will also be performing.Gates to India Song will be a love story performed by Marguerite Duras with Indian artist Nandita Das. For visual arts, there are installations and interactive choreographic navigations called Bangalore Fictions, France Heritage bringing in the historical landmarks of France, Quintessence will showcase paintings by  Dominique Paulin and  photographs by Michel Kirch. There will also be exhibitions on urban development and sustainable architecture, photography and painting exhibitions by Anay Mann and Gigi Scaria, respectively revisiting French heritage in India,.Another aspect of this event will be the strong presence of French literary circle at the Jaipur Literature Festival. The celebrated Albert Camus’ birth centenary will also be celebrated across India through the event. Gear up Delhi.DETAILAt: 16 cities across IndiaWhen: January to April 2013last_img read more

Sri Lanka navy arrests 24 TN fishermen

first_imgThe Sri Lankan navy on Tuesday arrested 24 fishermen from here and also chased away at gun point several others for allegedly fishing in Lankan waters near Katchatheevu in the Palk Straits.More then 3,000 fishermen in 600 boats had put out to sea from here last night. The Lankan navy personnel came in 10 patrol boats and sea bikes, threatened the fishermen and arrested 24 of them besides chasing away others at gun point, fishermen organisation leaders S Emerite and Sagayaraj said. The fishermen were fishing near Katchatheevu in Palk Straits, they said claiming the fishermen were fishing in traditional waters. On October 10, the navy personnel had arrested 19 fishermen from Nagapattinam district on charges of violating the International Maritime Boundary Line prompting Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Jayalalithaa to write to Prime Minister Narendra Modi urging him to take up the continued arrests of state’s fishermen at a high political level with Sri Lanka.  In another instance on October 2, seven fishermen from Rameswaram had been arrested by Lankan naval personnel off Katchatheevu islet for allegedly crossing the IMBL and fishing in their waters.last_img read more

We are living through a moment of madness that fut

first_imgWe are living through a moment of madness that future historians will write about: Black is white, down is up, rehypothecation is prudence, naked shorting is benevolent, abuse is love, theft is mercy. And all the while, humanity just sits and accepts their abuse. Following is courage, thinking is threat, and no one dares a sideways glance at the insanity, for fear that it will break. It’s sick; it’s evil; it’s disgusting; but for now it is also true. To quote a scientist from the early 1980s, upon seeing a photo of braided rings around Saturn: “It’s stark, raving mad, but it’s there.” This is the ultimate, screaming triumph of the political and banking elite – their highest high in the history of civilization. And yet, no matter how badly they abuse the world, they enjoy complete obedience. All cling to a system that grinds them up and all walk together into the sea as they are told, singing hymns to governments and central banks as they go. Either something breaks, or humanity tires of this insanity, or it continues until all the world is North Korea, worshiping photos of a vile little man, never lifting their eyes and thanking the vile little man for the deaths of themselves and their children. And the rest of the world is allowing it. You’d think that the Russians or the Chinese, at least, would make some self-interested moves, but they don’t. The entire “first world” financial system is manipulated. This is no secret – the manipulators not only admit it, but are proud of it. And yes, I am referring to central banks: manipulation is what they do. I really don’t have any inside information on this, except that I’ve heard a lot of confidential stories from Comex traders. (Don’t trust Comex for a second.) So, manipulation is a given. What I’m referring to is the fact that the manipulators are succeeding beyond anyone’s wildest dreams. Joe Average knows in his gut that everything is smoke and mirrors, but he is unwilling to look. He prays that the manipulators can keep the game going until he is dead, when he can no longer be held accountable. The success of the manipulators has reached such levels that their victims are unwilling to complain. In fact, their victims defend them! It’s a type of Stockholm Syndrome, spread over continents. I got an email two days ago, from a friend who happens to be one of the world’s great investment analysts. He was at wit’s end over the markets. Not because of price moves – his charts predicted those – but because people no longer cared about reality. Here’s what I wrote back to my friend: They are winning. There is no question about it. They are printing like mad with minimal inflation, stealing from millions at once with no riots, stoking raging bull markets based on no reason whatsoever, creating paper silver and gold without limit and without consequences, while keeping all the foreigners in line and obedient. And if something does ever break, they’ll need a war – a big, nasty war – the kind that really scares people – not tanks rolling through a desert. That’s the world as it stands today. Perhaps everything will change tomorrow, but for now, the manipulators are at peak success. “The madness of crowds” is here. If, somewhere, there is a successor to Charles Mackay (who wrote the classic book of that title), he must be a very busy boy. Paul Rosenberg FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more

Todays article comes to us from Dr Joel Wade a

first_img[Today’s article comes to us from Dr. Joel Wade, a world traveler, former NCAA champion and highly regarded specialist in the study of true happiness (rather than the superficial nonsense touted by today’s pop psychologists).] It’s good to have a back-up plan, or a plan B, especially in uncertain times; but it’s also important to remember that this is only for when your plan A is threatened. Often, the best thing you can do is to fully commit to your primary vision; sometimes the best defense is a good offense. It’s excellent to have a plan that you can fall back on if things don’t work out, but today, I want to talk about some elements of committing to your plan A (i.e. staying put) that can be easily neglected… because we take them for granted. If you’re thinking of moving away from your home, be it out of state or out of the country, before you do so, consider what you will be leaving behind. If you have family and friends where you live, if you have neighbors whom you know and who know you, those relationships can be a tremendous source of security and support. If you’ve always had these people in your life, you may not even think how much you depend on your connection with them. I don’t just mean that you know you could ask them for help if you need it; there is something extremely valuable, for your health and happiness and overall wellbeing, to having regular human contact with people whom you know and trust. Relationships are built on trust. You can enjoy any positive interaction with a fellow human being, even if it’s a friendly hello at the grocery store or a smile as you walk by on the street. But when you know and trust people and see them in person, make eye contact, shake hands or hug, and can settle into a comfortable conversation, the positive benefits are huge. If you intend to move away from these relationships, it’s important to acknowledge and accept that you will be losing something valuable. Our relationships can be the most fundamental source of joy and satisfaction in life. The positive contact we have with people improves our heart rate variability and our immune system and reduces inflammation. It also just plain feels good. Also, your long term, trust-based relationships are people who are more likely to be there for you – and you for them – if trouble strikes. When our kids were little, we talked about whom they know in the neighborhood. If there was ever any trouble, which houses could they run to? Which neighbors do we know well enough to trust? There were (and are) many to choose from, but a few top the list. That’s a great thing to have when there are kids involved, but it’s still important if there’s just one or two of you. We have neighbors across the street who are well into their 80s. They are two of the people whom our kids knew they could trust and go to if there was ever trouble. They’re our friends. We take time with them, and keep an eye on them, and if they need anything, they know they can ask us. That’s good for them, but it’s also good for us. It’s great to have people you trust, but it’s also deeply satisfying to be somebody who is trustworthy. That’s what true friendship is built on. It’s that mutual sense of trust that takes time and experience to build. If you’re thinking of moving, and doing so includes leaving town, be sure to factor in the loss of contact and support, and the loss of years and possibly decades of earned and established trust with people whose relationships you may have, to some degree, taken for granted. Another element of your plan A that can be overlooked is familiarity. If you’ve lived somewhere for a long time, you know things about the area that you didn’t when you first moved there. You know the roads, the stores, the restaurants. You know the terrain, the weather; you know the nearby towns. You probably know some “secret” driving routes to avoid traffic. You also probably know who puts on a good roof, or can take care of a plumbing or electrical problem dependably. Of course you can learn all of this over time in a new location. But you know them now right where you are. Then there’s the political aspect. If we are to have a country that values individual liberty and self-responsibility – and true win/win capitalism, as opposed to win/lose crony capitalism – it is people who need to advocate, argue, and fight for this, right here at home. What the Tea Partiers have been focused on during the past couple of years is mostly at the local, grassroots level. If you happen to be a high profile, politically active, charismatic person with high name recognition nationally or throughout your state, you may be able to have a big impact – as people like Senators Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and others are having now. But most of us do not have that big of a national presence. Where we can have a big impact, though, is locally, among the people and the community who knows us and trusts us. Effective persuasion does not come through bullying, nagging, or threatening. Effective persuasion comes through building relationships of trust and respect. When people know you, trust you, and respect you, they are more likely to listen to what you have to say. You may have a greater sphere of influence within your own community than you realize, because you may not think much about all of the daily contact you have with different folks. A friend of mine once said, “If you want to have a successful business, don’t move.” By living your life with benevolence and integrity, by settling into a place and treating people well over time, you build for yourself a community of people with whom you share trust, respect, joy, and history. You build for yourself a home. That is a successful plan A. And it’s a much more valuable resource than you might think. You can move somewhere else, and build it there, too, but it takes time, effort, and patience. If that’s necessary, or if you weigh all the options and moving away is the best one, that’s fine; just make sure that in pursuing your plan B, you’re not casting aside a perfectly good plan A. [Joel F. Wade, Ph.D. is the author of Mastering Happiness. He is a marriage and family therapist and life coach who works with people around the world via phone and Skype. You can get a FREE Learning Optimism E-Course if you sign up at his website, www.drjoelwade.com.] FreemansPerspective.comlast_img read more