Barrolle, T-Wolves in Double Wins

first_imgThe kanyan peppers boys of Mighty Barrolle have followed up their surprise win over LPRC-Oilers, beating the triple basketball champions, for the second time on Sunday 55-33 points.Barrolle extended their lead in a rather vibrating battle to defeat Oilers in the ongoing finals, of the ‘best-out-of-five’ games.The relatively convincing derby was described as “amazing” by scores of the Roller fans, including Oilers coach Paul Houlson.Sunday’s game was a rematch from Saturday owing to the rain, cutting off the match in the third quarter when Oilers were in a slight lead.On Friday, at the twitch of the finals, Mighty Barrolle initiated their captivating spree with a narrow win over Oilers, 69-68 points.Another supposedly underdog in the basketball finals Timber Wolves are ahead 2-1 series over triple female champions K-Delta.The female giants began the finals with 56-47 points win on Friday, but Timber Wolves turned the tables with two straight wins.On Saturday and Sunday, Timber Wolves surprisingly dumped K-Delta 51-50 and 60-52 points respectively.In the 2nd division, Georgia Blazers are leading Heats (2-1). Heats activated their win with 49-47 points on Friday, but Georgia Blazers overturned the tally with two wins; 51-50 and 49-47 points.Meanwhile, Wednesday’s win for Barrolle, Timber Wolves and Georgia Blazer would make them to grab their respective trophies, but a loss will cause the league to continue on Friday.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Para Badminton Worlds: Parul Parmar vs Manasi Joshi in Women’s Final, Double Joy for Tarun

first_img Manasi JoshiPara Badminton World ChampionshipsParul ParmarTarun First Published: August 24, 2019, 11:06 PM IST Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. Basel: Three-time World Champion Parul Parmar continued her dazzling form to storm into the women’s singles SL3 final of the BWF Para Badminton World Championships here Saturday.Top seed Parmar, who will be playing her seventh final this season, will face compatriot Manasi Joshi, 2017 Worlds bronze medallist, in the final. In the semi-finals, Parmar took just 20 minutes to defeat Turkish third seed Halime Yildiz 21-6, 21-16, while Joshi overcame Thailand’s Wandee Kamtam 21-13, 21-18 to make her first Worlds final.India coach Gaurav Khanna said: “It’s not one-time story that Parul will face Manasi. I wish both good lucks. Parul is quite experienced while Manasi is young and this will a great experience for her.” Khanna also praised Parmar’s “strong willpower and determination” and hoped that the “the undisputed journey of her will continue.” It was a double delight for two-time world champion Tarun, who entered the finals of men’s singles and doubles SL4 events, interestingly beating his Indonesian nemesis Fredy Setiawan in both the events.In the singles, he survived a scare against Setiawan before winning 21-14, 21-16 in 28 minutes.However, Sukant Kadam and Krishna Nagar had to settle for bronze after crashing out of the championships. Both faltered at the hands of top seeds.While Kadam fell against France’s top seed Lucas Mazur 11-21, 13-21 in men’s singles SL4, Nagar was ousted by his British nemesis Jack Shephard 13-21, 13-21 in SS6 competition in 29 minutes.Tarun will face his nemesis Mazur in the final.Much like the women’s final, the men’s doubles SL3-4 final will be an all-India affair as Tarun and Nitesh Kumar face Pramod Bhagat and Manoj Sarkar.Nitesh-Tarun came out with a brilliant show to shock the Indonesian experienced duo of Raekendi and Hary Susanto 23-21, 21-9 in the semi-finals, while Bhagat-Sarkar saw off the Indo-Thai pair of Umesh Vikram Kumar and Chawarat Kitichokwattana 21-15, 21-15.As many as 22 medal events are contested in this Championships, while the Tokyo 2020 will have 14 medal events in the sport that will make its Paralympic debut next September. last_img read more

Sir Alex Ferguson out of intensive care after surgery, say Manchester United

first_imgnews Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Manchester United have confirmed that Sir Alex Ferguson “no longer needs intensive care” after the brain haemorrhage he suffered on Saturday, with the 76-year-old now set to continue rehabilitation as an inpatient.Ferguson had been in Salford hospital since Saturday following an emergency operation but a statement from the club on Wednesday evening revealed that he is making progress in his recovery.“Sir Alex no longer needs intensive care and will continue rehabilitation as an inpatient,” it read. “His family have been overwhelmed by the level of support and good wishes but continue to request privacy as this will be vital during this next stage of recovery.” On hearing the positive update, the Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger sent his best wishes to his former rival. He said: “It is very fantastic news and I’m very happy for that. It was a concern because he has worked very hard and he deserves a long period of enjoying life, and hopefully he can do that in good shape.”Earlier, the United manager José Mourinho admitted that the club were “very, very positive” that Ferguson would recover. “We are confident,” he said. Alex Ferguson up close: sometimes difficult, always great Read more Manchester United José Mourinho Share on Pinterest Topics Alex Ferguson Share via Email Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook The manager does not believe there is a cloud over the club and described the spirits of players and staff as good. “We are very, very positive.”After Ferguson collapsed at the family home on Saturday, he was taken to Macclesfield district hospital at around 9am, before receiving a police escort to rush him to the Salford facility, where he was operated on.That day, the club issued the following statement: “Sir Alex Ferguson has undergone emergency surgery today for a brain haemorrhage. The procedure has gone very well but he needs a period of intensive care to optimise his recovery. His family request privacy in this matter.”United play at West Ham on Thursday evening and when asked how Ferguson’s condition might affect the display, Mourinho said: “I can only think that if there is any relation, it is a positive relation.”Romelu Lukaku will miss the game and is in a race to be fit for the FA Cup final against Chelsea on Saturday week. “That’s what we try,” said Mourinho, who added that Marouane Fellaini has a chance of playing in their final Premier League game, at home to Watford on Sunday.United need a point at West Ham to secure second place, their highest finish since winning the title five years ago. Yet the manager admits he has players who may never be mentally strong enough. “I trust some more than others that can bridge that gap,” said Mourinho. “That’s normal. I know the players. I worked with the players for a couple of years. And, of course, some of the players I am totally convinced are going to make it, some others I have good hopes that they are going to make it, and some others I don’t believe they are going to make it.“Of course we can keep [those not up to it]. Unless there is a perfect squad, where you buy one goalkeeper, you don’t like [him], you buy another one, or you buy a central defender, you don’t like, you buy another one, you have to keep players you don’t love – when I say love, I say it ‘footballistically’ – and players you don’t totally believe have the level of the squad.”United have beaten all the other top-six teams this season but managed to lose at Newcastle, Huddersfield and Brighton. “When you lose against all the teams that were promoted, that doesn’t smell right for me,” Mourinho said. Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Sevilla report Man United to UEFA

first_imgUEFA Champions League Sevilla to report Manchester United to UEFA over ticket price increase Ryan Benson 00:17 1/11/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) sevilla fans-cropped Getty Images UEFA Champions League Manchester United Sevilla v Manchester United Sevilla The ticketing row between the two clubs continued to escalate after the Spanish side said they will report their rivals to UEFA Sevilla have confirmed they will contact UEFA over Manchester United’s sudden ticket price increase and the English team’s failure to make five per cent of Old Trafford available to away fans.Tensions between the two clubs rose on Wednesday when United revealed in an email to supporters that they were to increase the price of tickets for Sevilla fans by £35 to £89 for their Champions League round-of-16 second leg at Old Trafford in March.That move came after United and Sevilla failed to reach a compromise regarding the Spanish club’s decision to charge away supporters £89 to attend the first leg at the Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan on February 21. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player United’s correspondence also revealed they plan to subsidise £35 towards their travelling fans’ tickets to bring the cost down to £54, the figure Liverpool supporters paid in the group stage.Sevilla responded in a similar fashion and will subsidise tickets of club members to bring costs back in line with United’s initial demands, though the Andalusians are angry they have only been given a 4.1 per cent allocation, rather than their entitled five per cent.CLUB STATEMENT | #SevillaFC allocated 2,995 tickets for Old Traffordhttps://t.co/Ceb8a0LIAo#vamosmisevilla pic.twitter.com/5Wjzg8dsfY— Sevilla FC (@SevillaFC_ENG) January 10, 2018A club statement read: “Last week Sevilla FC applied for the full allocation of tickets offered by Manchester United for the second leg of the round of 16 Champions League tie at Old Trafford.”This amounted to 2,995 tickets – 4.1% of the stadium’s capacity – which were initially priced at £50, £51 and £60.”Owing to questions of security, the Premier League club did not act in accordance with UEFA regulations – which dictate 5 per cent of the stadium’s capacity (3,800 seats in this case) should be made available to the visiting club – when ticket prices were announced midway through December.”Sevilla FC duly communicated the fixed prices and seat allocation for travelling fans to Manchester United. On the basis of this, Sevilla FC made the formal application for away tickets on the 2nd of January.”Though attempts have been made to reach an agreement on fixed prices for tickets, this was ultimately not possible. For that reason, Sevilla FC will maintain the duly communicated ticket prices.”Manchester United have announced a unilateral increase in ticket prices for our fans to ensure away tickets for the second leg cost the same as away tickets for the first.   “Sevilla FC will subsidise the price increase for club members travelling to Manchester for said fixture. With this subsidy, the club will guarantee that no club members pay more than the €60 initially specified.”Sevilla will be in contact with UEFA over both Manchester United’s failure to make 5 per cent of tickets available to away fans, as well as the club’s price increase after a formal application for an away allocation.”Sevilla will also look to guarantee that no Sevillista pays a penny more than any Manchester United fan for similar tickets – as competition regulations dictate.”last_img read more

PCI knocks SC door on issues relating to communication blockade in JK

first_imgNew Delhi: The Press Council of India (PCI) has moved the Supreme Court supporting the Centre and Jammu and Kashmir government’s decision to impose restrictions on communication in the state following the abrogation of Article 370.The application filed by the PCI seeks intervention in the petition filed by Anuradha Bhasin, Executive Editor of Kashmir Times, in which she had sought the removal of restrictions on communication which she said were coming in the way of journalists’ right to exercise their profession. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsThe application on behalf of the PCI was filed by advocate Anshuman Ashok on Friday. In the application, the PCI has justified the communication blockade saying that due to the security concerns there can be reasonable restrictions on the media. The PCI said since Bhasin’s petition concerns the right of the journalists/media for free and fair reporting on the one hand and national interest of integrity and sovereignty on the other, the council is of the opinion that it should present its view before the Apex Court and assist in deciding her petition justly in the interest of freedom of the press as well as in the national interest. The PCI further stated that in Bhasin’s petition, there is no mention about abrogation of the most contentious provision of the Constitution by Parliament which has caused the restrictions on communication facilities and other facilities in the interest of the integrity and sovereignty of the nation.last_img read more

NFL Teams Are Analyzing Everything From The Salary Cap To Fan Loyalty

Carl Bialik: Did you know the history of analytics in the NFL before you joined the league?Paraag Marathe: I definitely did. When I came into the league in 2001, analytics was certainly more prevalent in baseball. It was just starting to become prevalent in basketball. The NFL was sort of the latest adopter. You see it a lot more now. Unlike baseball, where it’s all around player evaluation, the NFL is more complicated. It’s much more of a team sport, with much more covariance between positions. Is a running back’s success due to his ability to break away, or his line’s ability to run-block, or his quarterback’s ability to pass, which makes the run easier?But the NFL also has two other areas where analytics plays a big role. The first is game management: How you manage the clock, when to go on fourth down, the run/pass play selection, those sorts of things. The second is the salary cap. With the advent of the salary cap in 1994, and where I made my mark with the 49ers and the NFL, is managing the salary cap much more analytically, similar to how a portfolio manager would manage a stock portfolio, managing risk.CB: I’ve read that you’ve applied analytics to fans. How does that work and what have you learned about what they want?PM: Oh yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it’s not just what they want, as in, what are their desires when they come to stadium, in terms of what they want to consume — content, beverages, coming closer to the game — but also the lifetime value of a fan. When you capture a fan’s loyalty, someone who becomes a fan at an early age, they will stay there. There’s a lot of loyalty. For professional teams 20 years ago, maybe as recently as 15 years ago, the vice president of marketing was all around what’s the cheerleader uniform and what’s the rallying cry for team. Now it’s all around what’s the content for the website, what’s the lifetime value of a fan, and so on. It’s much, much more analytical.CB: How did you first connect with Bill Walsh?PM: I was working at a consulting company, Bain and Co., on a bunch of sports-related projects. Bill Walsh and Terry Donahue were looking at drafts — not the players themselves, but draft slots. Is there a better algorithm, a better way to do the draft chart? It was a three-month project. I was the junior guy on the team. We sort of hit it off, and they asked me to come on board full-time.CB: How often, while you’ve been on the job, have people asked you if you’ve played football? How did you answer?PM: They either asked me, or they just assumed I didn’t. If they did ask me, I didn’t play college football, and I barely played high school football. I played baseball growing up, mostly. If you’re asking, did I feel like an outsider from the beginning when I started, I certainly did, but times have changed, and you earn respect with the work you do.CB: What was the status of analytics at the 49ers when you arrived?PM: It was a one-man show. To be fair, I never really did that much. It wasn’t so much on evaluating player talent on the field. It was a lot on the salary cap and how to be more efficient on managing the cap.CB: How about now?PM: We’ve got four or five folks, whether helping scouts better evaluate players, helping coaches, as well as the salary cap.CB: Has the whole organization bought into analytics?PM: Yeah, I’d like to think so. It’s definitely more accepted around the league. The Ravens just hired a head of their analytics department in 2012. You see it all across the board now. Clubs are trying to look for any competitive advantage they can. It’s not just, spend $1 more than the next team, it’s, what’s every competitive advantage you can squeeze out of this product?CB: Is it tough to find good people, with so many teams hiring?PM: No, I wouldn’t say that. There are so many good analysts across traditional industries, and sports is still such a sexy field, that there is no shortage of good talent. There are a lot of people who want to work in sports. Just go to the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference every year.CB: How important is it to be able to communicate the findings to people who aren’t technical?PM: At the end of the day, it boils down to this. The information is only as good as it is to the person receiving it. I’ll take a C+ piece of analysis communicated perfectly over an A+ piece of analysis that’s not communicated well. Only a small portion of the work is the analytics itself. The rest is putting it in a practical format so the salary-cap person and the coach can appreciate it and use it. Instead of trying to go overboard with analytics, focus on the practical: Focus on the things that have the highest impact on your organization.CB: Because of the importance of retaining a competitive advantage, do you generally not disclose specifically what you’re looking at, and what you’re finding?PM: Generally speaking, we don’t really talk about a lot of those things. But it’s not just analytics. In nutrition, sleep studies, and psychological aspects, people are looking for advantages every place they can.CB: Can you detect the spread of analytics in the league from how hard it is to get certain players in the draft, or from tactics of opponents?PM: It’s mostly through conversations. I’ve been in the league now 14 years, and just having conversations with people in every level, I’m starting to see changes. Not starting to see — there’s been a lot of changes.CB: Is analytics work being done within teams better than the work done outside it?PM: Yes and no. That’s a tough question to answer. There are only 32 teams and there are seven billion people. There’s a lot of stuff that’s not even published that’s probably really good. The difference between what’s happening with teams and what’s happening in the ether, is what’s out there is pretty theoretical, whereas what teams do has to be pretty actionable. The most actionable things are being done in clubs, but I’m sure there are some excellent things being done out there.CB: Which analytics publications do you read?PM: Football Outsiders, Pro Football Focus, different blogs, even you guys do some awesome stuff. All the stuff that’s done is really good.CB: You said in 2005 that even at 45 or 50, you’ll never be a football guy. Do you still feel that way?PM: That was almost 10 years ago. What I meant is, not having played or coached the game, it’s just different. I don’t understand the nuances of the Xs and Os, nor do I try to, in terms of schemes and things like that. There’s no point in me trying really hard to be average at something. It’s important to focus on the things I know I can do well, like manage the salary cap. I won’t be a coach or GM, nor do I aspire to be.CB: Does the NFL support analytics sufficiently? For instance, you’ve criticized the rule barring computers from the coaches’ booth.PM: They’re still getting better. There’s the rule against laptops, even calculators. It’s difficult for an offensive coordinator to even capture simple things like average yards per play on a drive, or how successful a certain play has been, in terms of even crunching it in Excel. They have to do it on a notepad. Things like that are frustrating. I wish they would react a little faster to technology changes. They’re getting there. Now they’re allowing tablets on the sidelines, so you don’t have to have the binder full of photos of plays. The FiveThirtyEight film “The Cowboys and the Indian,” which debuted last week, tells the story of A. Salam Qureishi, who brought computerized player analytics to the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960s. At the time, few other pro sports front offices used advanced statistics to make decisions about player acquisition and game management.By 2001, that wasn’t the case in baseball, but the NFL hadn’t progressed much since Qureishi’s days. That year, Paraag Marathe joined the San Francisco 49ers as a one-man team with goals similar to Qureishi’s: improve player acquisition.Marathe, like Qureishi, is of Indian descent. Unlike Qureishi, he knew a lot about football before working in the NFL. Marathe grew up in the Bay Area town of Saratoga, California, as a big fan of the 49ers and other Bay Area teams. He worked for the 49ers first as a consultant, on a three-month stint from the consulting firm Bain and Co. Then San Francisco executive Bill Walsh offered him a full-time job. “It was a no-brainer for me,” Marathe said in a telephone interview last week.Today, Marathe, 37, is one of the elder statesmen of NFL analytics. He oversees it for the 49ers as team president. He sees more of his competitors using similar tools, looking for every competitive advantage they can find. (We spoke last week amid a late-season slump that has eliminated the 49ers from the playoffs after three straight conference-championship-game appearances.) In the following transcript of our interview — lightly edited for brevity and clarity — Marathe explains why it remains easy to hire talented analysts, why communication is more important than statistical rigor and why plenty of good work is still being done outside the league. San Francisco 49ers President Paraag Marathe speaks at the annual Bay Area college football media day at Levi’s Stadium on July 30 in Santa Clara, Calif. Alex Washburn / AP read more