Maintenance Technician III, HVAC

first_imgClose visual acuity to perform an activity such as: preparingand analyzing data and figures, viewing a computer terminal, and/orextensive reading PURPOSE AND SCOPE:The Maintenance Technician III, HVAC maint ains and service srepairs on campus-wide heating, ventilating, and air-conditioningsystems. Installs and replaces parts for existing units accordingto specifications and established safety guidelines. Performs avariety of complicated tasks relying on experience and independentjudgmen t to plan and carry out goals. May lead and coordinate thework of other HVA C employees. Assists Senior Maintenance Techs andFacilities management as needed.ESSENTIAL JOB FUNCTIONS : Ability to receive detailed information through oralcommunication, and to m ake the discrimination in soundExtending hand(s) and arm(s) in any directionExpressing or exchanging ideas by means of the spoken wordincluding those activities in which they must convey detailed orimportant spoken instructions to other workers accurately, loudly,or quickly WORKING SCHEDULE AND CONDITIONS: Equipment used includes, PC workstation running on a LAN in aMicrosoft Windows environment, calculator, phone and other generaloffice equipment ; g as and electric powered tools and equipmenttypical in the HVAC industry, including but not limited to airconditioning and heating systems, vacuum devices, saws, drills, andvehiclesInterface with internal and external contacts as needed tocarry out the functions of the positionWork is performed both indoors in a climate-controlled officeenvironment and outdoors with exposure to normal atmosphericconditions, dirt, dust, weather variables, etc.Potential risks exist due to handling power tools, equipment,and chemicalsPosition involves intensive physical labor associated withmaintenance work and requires safety precautions at all times Capable of safely operating powered equipment, such as: saws,drills, and sanders, brush hog, tractor and be able to determinewhich equipment to use for a particular purposePicking, pinching, typing, or otherwise working, primarily withfingers rather than with the whole hand as in handlingPicking, holding, or otherwise working, primarily with thewhole handExerting up to 50 pounds of force occasionally and/ornegligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry,push, pull or otherwise move obj ects, including the humanbody PHYSICAL ABILITIES: Commitment to MissionThis job carries with it the obligation to uphold the Mission ofLone Star College (LSC) in carrying out the duties of the position.A commitment to positive interpersonal behaviors, professionalcommunication, diversity, integrity, leadership, stewardship,respect and accountability to LSC students and employees isessential.Cultural Beliefs Ability to perform labor intensive work associa ted withfacilities maintenance The Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Great Colleges to Work For” isdesigned to recognize colleges that have been successful increating great workplaces and to further research and understandingof the factors, dynamics and influences that have the most impacton organizational culture at higher education institutions.Lone Star College was recognized in five areas: Confidencein Senior Leadership; Diversity; Facilities, Workspace &Security; Job Satisfaction; and Work/Life Balance .Campus Marketing StatementLone Star College-KingwoodLone Star College offers high-quality, affordable academic transferand career training education to 99,000 students each semester. LSCis training tomorrow’s workforce today and redefining the communitycollege experience to support student success. Stephen C. Head,Ph.D., serves as chancellor of LSC, the largest institution ofhigher education in the Houston area with an annual economic impactof nearly $3 billion.LSC, which consists of seven colleges, ten centers, two universitycenters, Lone Star Corporate College and LSC-Online, iscontinuously named Great Colleges to Work For by the Chronicle ofHigher Education. To learn more, visit LoneStar.edu.Lone Star College-Kingwood, an innovative and dynamic communitycollege located in the pine-forested suburbs of northeast Houston,has an opening for someone interested in working with a diversegroup of colleagues who want to make a difference in the lives ofstudents and grow professionally. Kingwood focuses on fulfillingindividual dreams and enhancing community life and offers uniqueprograms in respiratory care, computer gaming and dentalhygiene.Campus address is 20000 Kingwood Drive, Kingwood, TX 77339.Job Description Directs and participates in preventive, corrective, and generalmaintenance a nd installation of HVAC systemsRecords daily maintenance activities lo g and produces periodicreportsProvides advice and council to HVAC maintenan ce crew relativeto daily tasksAssist other HVAC staff with the performance of their duties asneededAssists in annual inve ntory of maintenance departmentAssists with preparation of Requests for Bids for facilitiesenhancements and equipment/tool purchases. Compiles informationfrom responses to bids and makes recommendations for selection ofvendors and pur chase of equipment and servicesActively follows college, state, and federal guidelinesregarding safety and helps ensure that others in the department doas wellAssists with input of the annual department budgetResponsible for other reason able related duties asassigned Must be well organized and possess int erpersonal communicationskillsAbility to understand and follow and issue directions givenorally and in writing, and must be able to read and understand blueprints One LSCStudent FocusedOwn ItAdvance EquityCultivate CommunityChoose Learning KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES: REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS: Length of time (specific months and years) of employmentIf the position was full time or part timeIf the position was paid or unpaidUnofficial transcript for highest earned degree SalaryHiring salary range is $46,300 – $53,245Lone Star College provides a hiring salary range for all postedfull-time non-faculty positions. Where your salary offer would fallin that range is determined by your related experience andeducation. Should you receive an offer of employment from Lone StarCollege, the resume submitted in the application process will beutilized to calculate your salary offer. The information outlinedbelow will provide the Office of Human Resources everything neededto determine an accurate starting salary.Your resume should provide a complete picture of your workexperience. The resume should include the following information foreach position listed: High school diploma and at least 3 years of related workexperience, or an equivalent combinat ion of education andexperienceHVAC or Type II EPA CertificationMust have valid Texas driver’s license and be eligible forinsurance coverage Additionally, any certifications listed as required or preferred inthe Lone Star College job description should be included in theresume submitted.Benefits Marketing StatementBy joining our top-notch institution, you will enjoy being a partof an organization that offers a supportive, collegial workenvironment and excellent work/life balance. This includes a fullcomprehensive and competitive benefits package, a generous numberof paid holidays and vacation days, wellness programs, tuitionwaiver, professional development opportunities and more.Special InstructionsGo to the Job Search page, click on ‘My Activities’ at the top ofthe page. Under My Cover Letters and Attachments you will click on‘Add Attachment.’ Please be sure to put the Job ID# in the titleonce you name your file for cover letters only, unless you attachedyour cover letter with your resume.If you are applying for an Instructional position (i.e. Faculty,Adjunct Faculty, Instructor), please ensure you include thefollowing to be considered: Resume/CV, Cover Letter, TeachingPhilosophy, and unofficial transcripts.You must limit your file name for any attachment to 40 charactersor less.How to ApplyALL APPLICANTS MUST APPLY ONLINE ONLYWe will not accept application material received via fax, email,mail, or hand delivered.Postings for part-time and adjunct positions are active for theacademic year. By selecting the option to receive notifications onyour profile, you will begin receiving electronic communicationregarding new opportunities with Lone Star College (LSC).If selected for an interview, a recruiter will contact you byphone, or email to schedule an interview.Lone Star College participates in the E-Verify program, under whichLone Star College provides the federal government with informationfrom each new employee’s Form I-9 to confirm that the employee isauthorized to work in the United States.More information on the E-Verify program is available at www.dhs.gov/E-Verify .Lone Star College is an EEO Employer. All positions aresubject to a criminal background check.last_img read more

Bob Weir And John Mayer Discuss Dead & Company’s Purpose On CBS

first_imgThis morning, the Dead & Company band were profiled on an exciting CBS Sunday Morning segment. Airing on the morning before the band’s Bonnaroo appearance, a web exclusive video from an interview with Bob Weir and John Mayer goes in-depth about the group’s overall purpose.Weir goes into how the band is finding their own voice and message, when interviewer Anthony Mason asks him how long that typically takes. Weir cheekily responds, “Time,” before Mayer chimes in about his nervousness to do the Grateful Dead’s catalog justice. Of course Weir assuages his fears with his own confidence, showing a playful exchange between the two Grateful guitarists.Mayer then talks about how he prepared for the role of lead guitarist, with nothing but praise for the technique and talents of Jerry Garcia. You can watch the full video here.last_img read more

It’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggests

first_imgThe Washington Post 26 May 2017Family First Comment: Interesting findings – and debunks claims that euthanasia is required because of physical pain..“Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”And“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying… Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”But a study released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests the answers may be surprising: The reasons patients gave for wanting to end their lives had more to do with psychological suffering than physical suffering.The study, based on information from Canada’s University Health Network in Toronto, represents all 74 people who inquired about assistance in dying from March 2016 to March 2017. Most were white and were diagnosed with cancer or a neurological disorder like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying law, or MAiD, allows for adults with serious and incurable diseases in an advanced state to seek help. At the University Health Network, which operates four large hospitals, patients must go through several levels of evaluations, and if they meet the criteria, they can come to the hospital to receive a lethal medication intravenously.For many people, death from a terminal illness may be synonymous with pain. Much of the discussion about assisted suicide focuses on compassionate palliative care for cancer patients and about suffering that can’t be controlled by even the strongest opioids. But that’s not what the people in the new study report.“It’s what I call existential distress,” explained researcher Madeline Li, an associate professor at University of Toronto. “Their quality of life is not what they want. They are mostly educated and affluent — people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be.”“It has been very surprising to me,” Li said in an interview.One of the main things these patients bring up has to do with “autonomy.” It’s a broad philosophical concept that has to do with being able to make your own decisions, not being dependent on others, wanting to be able to enjoy the things you enjoy and wanting dignity.One patient was a marathon runner before her cancer left her confined to bed. “That was not how she saw her identity,” Li said. Another patient, a university professor, identified his intellect as the most important quality that he values in himself: “He had a brain tumor, and he didn’t want to get to the point of losing control of his own mind, couldn’t think clearly and couldn’t be present.”The study also provides information regarding one of the most controversial aspects of physician-assisted suicide: That it could be forced on the poor, uninsured or those worried about being a burden to their loved ones. In Canada, a requirement for being considered for MAiD is being under the national health insurance program, and most of the patients were financially well-off.A study published in 2015 based on interviews with 159 patients or family members of deceased patients in Oregon — which allowed physicians to give prescriptions for self-administered lethal medications in 1997 — found similarly complex psychological motivations for decisions.“These patients considered a hastened death over prolonged periods of time and repeatedly assessed the benefits and burdens of living versus dying,” researchers wrote in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “None of the participants cited responding to bad news, such as the diagnosis of cancer, or a depressed mood as motivations for interest in hastened death. Lack of access to health care and lack of palliative care also were not mentioned as issues of concern.”Likewise a study in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1999 about the first year of the Oregon law noted: “Many physicians reported that their patients had been decisive and independent throughout their lives or that the decision to request a lethal prescription was consistent with a long-standing belief about the importance of controlling the manner in which they died.”READ MORE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/05/24/its-not-pain-but-existential-distress-that-leads-people-to-assisted-suicide-study-suggests/?utm_term=.7d43595fbbb3Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Berg is the Word: USC’s biggest flaw is the same as it was in 2018

first_imgThere was cornerback Iman Marshall’s unsportsmanlike conduct penalty that sealed a loss to Cal.  USC also missed out on a scoring opportunity after freshman cornerback Chris Steele recovered a fumble in Washington territory early in the fourth quarter. USC had needed a spark, something to break the cycle of incompetence its offense had displayed for most of the game, and this appeared to be it … until St. Brown picked up an offensive pass interference penalty for blocking downfield, setting the Trojans up for a glum three-and-out. There was quarterback JT Daniels’ horrible decision to throw deep on a fourth-quarter interception against UCLA, a game in which Bruin running back Joshua Kelley ran practically unabated for 289 yards and two touchdowns as defenders missed tackle after tackle and assignment after assignment.  It’s time to find someone who can restore a culture of accountability at USC. That is, until USC went to Seattle to face No. 17 Washington Saturday. The Trojans lost 28-14 as third-string redshirt junior quarterback Matt Fink threw three interceptions in his first collegiate start, but the game was closer than the final score indicated. USC had a lot of chances in the second half to pull even with the Huskies but fell into the same bad habits that afflicted it in 2018. On that topic, offensive coordinator Graham Harrell faces some questions for his play-calling on USC’s last truly threatening drive of the game. With 6:29 remaining, USC had first-and-goal inside the Washington 10 and had a chance to make things interesting with a score and a stop. USC ran three straight times before Harrell called for a corner route to freshman wide receiver Drake London at the back corner of the end zone, hardly the ideal route or target against such a deep secondary and with a bevy of proven pass-catchers.  What plagued USC football throughout a dismal 5-7 campaign a year ago was discipline. No team in the country saw more talented players miss so many assignments, pick up so many penalties and set their team back with so many boneheaded mistakes. The biggest swing in momentum came in the third quarter after a long run from junior tailback Stephen Carr helped move the Trojans inside the Washington 11-yard line. Fink dropped back and targeted senior wide receiver Michael Pittman Jr. on a slant, never seeing junior defensive back Elijah Molden dropping into coverage. Two plays later, multiple Trojan defenders over-pursued on a run play, allowing junior tailback Salvon Ahmed to sprint 89 yards untouched for a score that put Washington up 28-7. There is no possible excuse for USC overcommitting on a back as explosive as Ahmed. Some might say Fink’s interception can be chalked up to the inexperience and inability of a third-stringer, which would make sense if Daniels and freshman quarterback Kedon Slovis hadn’t made almost identical bad decisions against Fresno State and BYU, respectively. Missing underneath defenders has been a trend in the Trojans’ otherwise successful passing game this season, and with three different quarterbacks displaying issues with it, it can only be attributed to poor coaching.center_img It has been clear for a while now that the team needs a culture change, and it appears a pivot to Harrell’s Air Raid offense is not enough. Head coach Clay Helton has had well over a year to fix the discipline issues that have cost the program not only wins, but its reputation.  There was wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown’s fumble at the opposing 15-yard line against Notre Dame just before the half, giving the Irish all the momentum in a tightly-contested game.  Aidan Berg is a junior writing about sports. He is also an associate managing editor for Daily Trojan. His column, “Berg is the Word,” runs every Monday. Richmond’s outburst reflected the feelings of many USC fans during the last year and a half. Despite some of its issues in recruiting, the program still has too much talent to lose the games it does. The most frustrating part of Saturday’s loss was that it was a winnable game, and yet anyone familiar with this team could feel pretty much from kickoff that the Trojans would do everything they could to shoot themselves in the foot. Every time, you could either feel the mistake coming or knew that it spelled doom for the Trojans’ chances in that game. Often, it was both. The Trojans’ effort was littered with these ill-timed mistakes. The team had eight penalties for 80 yards, many of which came in the form of false starts on the offensive line, which had been surprisingly solid to open the season. The crowd noise at a rollicking Husky Stadium gave the unit fits; at one point, redshirt senior offensive tackle Drew Richmond, a repeat offender Saturday, got so frustrated after one of his false starts that he yelled at Fink even though the quarterback was using claps rather than his voice to start the play. It was a problem I thought had been addressed at least a little this season. Through four games, the defensive line’s stinginess was one of the Trojans’ highlights, and the offensive line was doing a much better job. Sure, there were some conduct penalties, but one of them (redshirt freshman tailback Markese Stepp dapping up Reggie Bush after a game-sealing touchdown run against then-No. 10 Utah) was pretty great, and the team seemed to feed off the emotion that drew those flags rather than letting them derail its progress. As the defense flew around and the offense decimated defenders through the air in victories over Stanford and Utah, I kept waiting for the telltale flags and miscues that always seemed destined to sink this team. They never came. Even the BYU game was more about the Cougars’ game plan than USC’s errors. last_img read more